Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11593

STATE OF MINNESOTA

 

Journal of the House

 

NINETY-THIRD SESSION - 2024

 

_____________________

 

EIGHTY-NINTH DAY

 

Saint Paul, Minnesota, Thursday, March 7, 2024

 

 

      The House of Representatives convened at 3:30 p.m. and was called to order by Melissa Hortman, Speaker of the House.

 

      Prayer was offered by Archbishop Bernard Hebda, Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis, St. Paul, Minnesota.

 

      The members of the House gave the pledge of allegiance to the flag of the United States of America.

 

      The roll was called and the following members were present:

 


Acomb

Agbaje

Anderson, P. E.

Anderson, P. H.

Backer

Bahner

Bakeberg

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Berg

Bierman

Bliss

Brand

Burkel

Carroll

Cha

Clardy

Coulter

Curran

Daniels

Davids

Davis

Demuth

Dotseth

Edelson

Elkins

Engen

Feist

Finke

Fischer

Fogelman

Franson

Frederick

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gillman

Gomez

Greenman

Hansen, R.

Hanson, J.

Harder

Hassan

Hemmingsen-Jaeger

Her

Hicks

Hill

Hollins

Hornstein

Howard

Hudella

Hudson

Huot

Hussein

Igo

Jacob

Johnson

Jordan

Joy

Keeler

Kiel

Klevorn

Knudsen

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Kozlowski

Koznick

Kraft

Kresha

Lee, F.

Lee, K.

Liebling

Lillie

Lislegard

Long

McDonald

Mekeland

Moller

Mueller

Murphy

Myers

Nadeau

Nash

Nelson, M.

Nelson, N.

Neu Brindley

Newton

Niska

Noor

Norris

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson, B.

Olson, L.

Pelowski

Pérez-Vega

Perryman

Petersburg

Pfarr

Pinto

Pryor

Pursell

Quam

Rarick

Rehm

Reyer

Robbins

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Sencer-Mura

Skraba

Smith

Stephenson

Swedzinski

Tabke

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

Virnig

West

Wiener

Wiens

Witte

Wolgamott

Xiong

Youakim

Zeleznikar

Spk. Hortman


 

      A quorum was present.

 

      Altendorf, Frazier, Grossell and Heintzeman were excused.

 

      The Chief Clerk proceeded to read the Journal of the preceding day.  There being no objection, further reading of the Journal was dispensed with and the Journal was approved as corrected by the Chief Clerk.


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REPORTS OF STANDING COMMITTEES AND DIVISIONS

 

 

Liebling from the Committee on Health Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 2177, A bill for an act relating to health; prohibiting the sale or offer for sale of flavored products; authorizing penalties; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 461.12, subdivision 2; 461.19; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 461.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 3, line 27, delete "2023" and insert "2024"

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Becker-Finn from the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 2309, A bill for an act relating to consumer data privacy; giving various rights to consumers regarding personal data; placing obligations on certain businesses regarding consumer data; providing for enforcement by the attorney general; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 13; proposing coding for new law as Minnesota Statutes, chapter 325O.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 4, line 31, delete "specific location" and insert "geographic coordinates"

 

Page 4, line 32, delete "sufficient accuracy to determine the consumer's street address" and insert "an accuracy of more than three decimal degrees of latitude and longitude or the equivalent in an alternative geographic coordinate system, or a street address derived from these coordinates"

 

Page 7, after line 3, insert:

 

"(6) information that is:

 

(i) maintained by an entity that meets the definition of health care provider at Code of Federal Regulations, title 45, section 160.103, to the extent that the entity maintains the information in the manner required of covered entities with respect to protected health information for purposes of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, Public Law 104-191, and related regulations; or

 

(ii) included in a limited data set as described at Code of Federal Regulations, title 45, section 164.514, paragraph (e), to the extent that the information is used, disclosed, and maintained in the manner specified by that paragraph;"

 

Renumber the items in sequence

 

Page 8, line 15, delete "only and directly" and insert "principally"

 

Page 8, line 23, delete "only and directly" and insert "principally"


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Page 18, line 25, after "data" insert a comma

 

Page 18, line 26, after "where the" insert "controller knows that the"

 

Page 20, delete lines 8 to 10 and insert:

 

"(iii) establish, implement, and maintain reasonable administrative, technical, and physical data security practices to protect the confidentiality, integrity, and accessibility of personal data;

 

(iv) limit the collection of personal data to what is adequate, relevant, and reasonably necessary in relation to the purposes for which such data are processed;"

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on State and Local Government Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Becker-Finn from the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 3456, A bill for an act relating to labor; prohibiting restrictive employment covenants in certain service contracts; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 181.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 1, line 19, delete everything after the period

 

Page 1, delete line 20 and insert:

 

"(c) When a provision in an existing contract violates this section, the service provider must provide notice to their employees of this section and the restrictive covenant in the existing contract that violates this section."

 

Page 2, delete subdivision 3

 

Page 2, line 10, after "2024" insert ", and applies to contracts and agreements entered into on or after that date"

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Becker-Finn from the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 3470, A bill for an act relating to the military; modifying the definition of criminal justice agencies; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 13.02, subdivision 3a.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

      The report was adopted.


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Becker-Finn from the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 3473, A bill for an act relating to the military; amending provisions related to the National Guard; modifying the types of data regarding service members that the adjutant general may request from other agencies; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 192.25; 192.67.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Delete everything after the enacting clause and insert:

 

"Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 13.785, is amended to read:

 

13.785 VETERANS OR MILITARY AFFAIRS DATA CODED ELSEWHERE.

 

Subdivision 1.  Scope.  The sections referred to in this section are codified outside this chapter.  Those sections classify veterans or military affairs data as other than public, place restrictions on access to government data, or involve data sharing.

 

Subd. 2.  Department of Veterans Affairs.  (a) Certain veterans benefits and military certificates of discharge.  Access to military certificates of discharge and to files pertaining to claims for certain veterans benefits is governed by section 196.08.

 

(b) Environmental Hazards Information and Assistance Act.  Disclosure of summary data and of the identity of a veteran about whom information is received under sections 196.19 to 196.26, is governed by section 196.25.

 

Subd. 3.  Veterans rewards and privileges; service officers.  Data maintained by county veterans service officers are classified under section 197.603.

 

Subd. 4.  Deceased veterans data.  Data relating to veterans deceased as a result of service-connected causes are classified under section 197.225.

 

Subd. 5.  Veterans stable housing.  Data maintained for purposes of the veterans stable housing initiative is classified under section 196.081.

 

Subd. 6.  Service member data; disclosure to adjutant general.  Access to data on a service member of the military forces by the adjutant general of the Minnesota National Guard is governed by section 192.67, subdivision 2.

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 192.25, is amended to read:

 

192.25 EXEMPTION FROM PROCESS; TRANSFER TO CIVIL AUTHORITIES.

 

Subdivision 1.  Exemption from process.  No member of the guard shall be arrested, or served with any summons, order, warrant or other civil process after having been ordered to any duty or while going to, attending or returning from any place to which the member is required to go for military duty; but nothing herein shall prevent an arrest by order of a military officer or for a felony or breach of the peace committed while not in the actual performance of assigned duties.  The articles of equipment personally owned by such members shall be exempt from seizure or sale for debt.

 

Subd. 2.  Transfer to civil authorities.  When probable cause exists that a criminal offense, other than a crime designated as a purely military offense in section 192A.021, has been committed by any officer or enlisted member of the military forces while on duty status other than federal duty, the officer or enlisted member may be turned over


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by superior officers to the proper civil authorities of the county or municipality in which the offense occurred for adjudication of such crime, to include imposition of pretrial restraint, but trial and punishment by the civil authorities shall not preclude trial and additional punishment or dismissal from the service by court-martial for any military offense resulting from the commission of said crime.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 192.67, is amended to read:

 

192.67 OFFENDERS; TRANSFER TO CIVIL AUTHORITIES; SERVICE MEMBER DATA.

 

Subdivision 1.  Transfer to civil authorities.  When any criminal offense is committed by any officer or enlisted member of the military forces while on duty status other than federal duty, the officer or enlisted member shall be turned over by superior officers to the proper civil authorities of the county or municipality in which the offense occurred for punishment for such crime, but such trial and punishment by the civil authorities shall not preclude trial and additional punishment or dismissal from the service by court-martial for any military offense resulting from the commission of said crime.

 

Subd. 2.  Service member data.  Notwithstanding any provision of chapter 13 or other state law, all confidential data on individuals and private data on individuals, as defined by section 13.02, subdivisions 3 and 12, pertaining to any service member of the military forces and maintained by any government entity, including but not limited to investigative reports and law enforcement data, including but not limited to all data collected and defined under section 13.82 pertaining to any service member of the military forces, must be made accessible to the adjutant general of the Minnesota National Guard upon request of the Office of the State Judge Advocate.  All information, data, and records obtained under this subdivision may be accessed, copied, transmitted, or provided to the adjutant general without a court order or request from the subject of the data when the matter involves any officer or enlisted member of the military forces.  The adjutant general may only use data made accessible under this subdivision in support of military justice and Minnesota National Guard administrative and disciplinary actions."

 

Correct the title numbers accordingly

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Moller from the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 3490, A bill for an act relating to public safety; prohibiting the sale of human remains for commercial purposes; establishing a felony offense; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 609.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 1, line 6, after "OF" insert "CALCIFIED" and delete "FOR COMMERCIAL PURPOSES"

 

Page 2, line 1, after "of" insert "calcified" and delete "for commercial purposes" and delete "exceptions" and insert "donation and reimbursement"

 

Page 2, line 2, after "selling" insert "calcified"

 

Page 2, line 3, after "offering" insert "calcified" and delete "for commercial purposes"


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Page 2, line 4, delete everything after "(a)" and insert "shall not be construed to limit the donation of human remains:"

 

Page 2, line 9, after the semicolon, insert "or"

 

Page 2, line 12, delete "; or" and insert a period

 

Page 2, delete lines 13 and 14 and insert:

 

"(c) Paragraph (a) does not apply to the sale or offer for sale of human remains that is incidental to the sale of real property, including undisturbed burial plots, cemeteries, crypts, or other burial features.

 

(d) Nothing in this section shall be construed to prohibit a person from recovering reasonable expenses for the processing, preservation, quality control, storage, and transportation, or final disposition of human remains for the legitimate purposes as described in this section."

 

Amend the title accordingly

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Moller from the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 3539, A bill for an act relating to commerce; establishing sales restrictions of aerosol dusters containing 1,1-difluoroethane; providing criminal penalties; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 325F.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 2, lines 3, 6, and 8, after "duster" insert "containing DFE"

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Howard from the Committee on Housing Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 3591, A bill for an act relating to housing; amending provisions relating to residential housing leases; amending landlord and tenant rights and obligations; amending residential tenant screening agency obligations; amending provisions relating to residential housing evictions; amending provisions relating to actions commenced by tenants; creating new rights and obligations for landlords and tenants; making clarifying, technical, and conforming changes to landlord and tenant provisions; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 504B.001, subdivisions 4, 5, 11, 14, by adding subdivisions; 504B.101; 504B.111; 504B.115, subdivision 1; 504B.116; 504B.118; 504B.131; 504B.141; 504B.145; 504B.151, subdivision 1; 504B.155; 504B.161, subdivisions 2, 4, 5, by adding subdivisions; 504B.173, subdivision 1; 504B.175, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 504B.177; 504B.178, subdivisions 1, 3, 7, 9, 10, by adding a subdivision; 504B.181, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision;


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504B.185, subdivision 2, by adding a subdivision; 504B.195, subdivisions 1, 5, by adding a subdivision; 504B.204; 504B.205, subdivision 5; 504B.231; 504B.241, subdivisions 1, 4, 5, by adding a subdivision; 504B.245; 504B.261; 504B.265, subdivisions 1, 2, by adding a subdivision; 504B.271; 504B.275; 504B.285, subdivisions 1, 2; 504B.315; 504B.345, by adding a subdivision; 504B.365, subdivisions 1, 3, 5, by adding a subdivision; 504B.371, subdivision 2; 504B.385, subdivisions 1, 4, 5, 6, 9, 11; 504B.391; 504B.395, subdivisions 1, 4, 6; 504B.415; 504B.421; 504B.425; 504B.431; 504B.441; 504B.451; 504B.471; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 504B.135; 504B.161, subdivision 1; 504B.171, subdivision 1; 504B.291, subdivision 1; 504B.321, subdivision 5, by adding a subdivision; 504B.331; 504B.335; 504B.345, subdivision 1; 504B.371, subdivision 3; 504B.375, subdivision 1; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 504B; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 504B.121; 504B.161, subdivision 6; 504B.173, subdivisions 2, 3, 4; 504B.175, subdivisions 2, 3, 4; 504B.178, subdivisions 8, 11; 504B.181, subdivision 5; 504B.195, subdivisions 2, 3, 4; 504B.265, subdivision 4; 504B.285, subdivisions 3, 4; 504B.355; 504B.385, subdivisions 2, 7, 10; 504B.445, subdivision 8; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 504B.178, subdivision 4.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Delete everything after the enacting clause and insert:

 

"Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.001, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Housing-related neighborhood organization.  "Housing-related neighborhood organization" means a nonprofit corporation incorporated under chapter 317A that:

 

(1) designates in its articles of incorporation or bylaws a specific geographic community to which its activities are limited; and

 

(2) is formed in part for the purposes of promoting community safety, crime prevention, and housing quality in a nondiscriminatory manner.

 

For purposes of this chapter, an action taken by a neighborhood organization with the written permission of a residential tenant means, with respect to a building with multiple dwelling units, an action taken by the neighborhood organization with the written permission of one of the residential tenants of a majority of the occupied units.

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.001, subdivision 14, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 14.  Violation.  "Violation" means:

 

(1) a violation of any state, county or city health, safety, housing, building, fire prevention, or housing maintenance code applicable to the building;

 

(2) a violation of any of the covenants set forth in section 504B.161, subdivision 1, clause (1) or (2), or in section 504B.171, subdivision 1 this chapter; or

 

(3) a violation of any federal, state, county, or city laws protecting tenants from discrimination;

 

(4) a violation of any applicable tenant rights and landlord obligations for public and subsidized tenancies under local, state, or federal law; or

 

(3) (5) a violation of an oral or written agreement, lease, or contract for the rental of a dwelling in a building.


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Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.001, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 16.  Abandonment.  (a) "Abandonment of tenancy" means the intentional and voluntary absolute relinquishment of premises by the residential tenant.

 

(b) "Abandonment of personal property" means a residential tenant leaving some of the tenant's personal property on the premises after permanently vacating the property.

 

Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.101, is amended to read:

 

504B.101 DISTRESS FOR RENT.

 

The remedy of distress for rent is abolished.  The requirements of this section may not be waived or modified by the parties to a residential lease.  Any provision, whether oral or written, of a lease or other agreement by which any provision of this section is waived by a tenant is contrary to public policy and void.  The tenant shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $1,000, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of this section.

 

Sec. 5.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.111, is amended to read:

 

504B.111 WRITTEN LEASE REQUIRED; PENALTY.

 

(a) A landlord of a residential building with 12 or more residential units must have a written lease for each unit rented to a residential tenant.  The written lease must identify the specific unit the residential tenant will occupy before the residential tenant signs the lease.  Notwithstanding any other state law or city ordinance to the contrary, a landlord may ask for the tenant's full name and date of birth on the lease and application.  A landlord who fails to provide a lease, as required under this section, is guilty of a petty misdemeanor.

 

(b) The tenant shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $500, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of this section.

 

Sec. 6.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.115, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Copy of written lease to tenant.  Where there is a written lease, a landlord must give a copy to a tenant occupying a dwelling unit whose signature appears on the lease agreement.  The landlord may obtain a signed and dated receipt, either as a separate document or an acknowledgment included in the lease agreement itself, from the tenant acknowledging that the tenant has received a copy of the lease.  This signed receipt or acknowledgment is prima facie evidence that the tenant has received a copy of the lease.  The landlord must provide the copy of the lease agreement with 14 days of the tenant's written request.  The tenant shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $250, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of this section.

 

Sec. 7.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.116, is amended to read:

 

504B.116 PRORATED RENT REQUIRED.

 

(a) When a lease term for a residential unit ends on a date before the last day of the final month, the amount of rent to be paid for the final month owed for the final month of rent must be prorated at the average daily rate for that month so that the tenant only pays for the actual number of days that occupancy is allowed.  This provision applies to all leases, including leases requiring the last month of rent to be paid in advance.  Any attempted waiver of this


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section by a landlord and tenant, by contract or otherwise, shall be void and unenforceable.  The tenant shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $500, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of this section.

 

(b) For purposes of this section, prorated rent must be calculated using the actual number of calendar days for the calendar month in which the lease expires.

 

Sec. 8.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.118, is amended to read:

 

504B.118 RECEIPT FOR RENT PAID IN CASH.

 

A landlord receiving rent or other payments from a tenant in cash must provide a written receipt for payment immediately upon receipt if the payment is made in person, or within three business days if payment in cash is not made in person.  Any attempted waiver of this section by a landlord and tenant, by contract or otherwise, shall be void and unenforceable.  The tenant shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $250, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of this section.

 

Sec. 9.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.131, is amended to read:

 

504B.131 RENT LIABILITY; UNINHABITABLE BUILDINGS.

 

A tenant or occupant of a building that is destroyed or becomes uninhabitable or unfit for occupancy through no fault or neglect of the tenant or occupant may vacate and surrender such a building.  A tenant or occupant may expressly agree otherwise except as prohibited by section 504B.161.  Any attempted waiver of this section by a landlord and tenant, by contract or otherwise, shall be void and unenforceable.  The tenant shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $1,000, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of this section.  This section shall be liberally construed for the protection of tenants.

 

Sec. 10.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.141, is amended to read:

 

504B.141 URBAN REAL ESTATE; HOLDING OVER.

 

When a tenant of urban real estate, or any interest therein, holds over and retains possession after expiration of the lease without the landlord's express agreement, no tenancy for any period other than the shortest interval between the times of payment of rent under the terms of the expired lease shall be implied.  Any attempted waiver of this section by a landlord and tenant, by contract or otherwise, shall be void and unenforceable.  The tenant shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $250, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of this section.

 

Sec. 11.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.145, is amended to read:

 

504B.145 RESTRICTION ON AUTOMATIC RENEWALS OF LEASES.

 

Subdivision 1.  Automatic renewal.  Notwithstanding the provisions of any residential lease, in order to enforce any automatic renewal clause of a lease of an original term of two months or more which states, in effect, that the term shall be deemed renewed for a specified additional period of time of two months or more unless the tenant gives notice to the landlord of an intention to quit the premises at the expiration of the term due to expire, the landlord must give notice to the tenant as provided in this section.  The notice must be in writing and direct the tenant's attention to the automatic renewal provision of the lease.  the notice must be served personally or mailed by certified mail at least 15 days, but not more than 30 days prior to the time that the tenant is required to furnish notice of an intention to quit.


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Subd. 2.  Penalty.  If the landlord does not comply with the notice requirements of this statute, the tenant may choose to terminate the lease on the last day of the lease without further notice unless a new agreement is reached by the parties.

 

Subd. 3.  Waiver prohibited.  Any attempted waiver of this section by a landlord and tenant, by contract or otherwise, shall be void and unenforceable.  The tenant shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $500, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of this section.  This section shall be liberally construed for the protection of tenants.

 

Sec. 12.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.151, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Limitation on lease and notice to tenant.  (a) Once a landlord has received notice of a contract for deed cancellation under section 559.21 or notice of a mortgage foreclosure sale under chapter 580 or 582, or summons and complaint under chapter 581, the landlord may only enter into (i) a periodic residential lease agreement with a term of not more than two months or the time remaining in the contract cancellation period or the mortgagor's redemption period, whichever is less or (ii) a fixed term residential tenancy not extending beyond the cancellation period or the landlord's period of redemption until:

 

(1) the contract for deed has been reinstated or paid in full;

 

(2) the mortgage default has been cured and the mortgage reinstated;

 

(3) the mortgage has been satisfied;

 

(4) the property has been redeemed from a foreclosure sale; or

 

(5) a receiver has been appointed.

 

(b) Before entering into a lease under this section and accepting any rent or security deposit from a tenant, the landlord must notify the prospective tenant in writing that the landlord has received notice of a contract for deed cancellation or notice of a mortgage foreclosure sale as appropriate, and the date on which the contract cancellation period or the mortgagor's redemption period ends.

 

(c) This section does not apply to a manufactured home park as defined in section 327C.015, subdivision 8.

 

(d) A landlord who violates the requirements in this subdivision is liable to the lessee for a civil penalty of $500 Any attempted waiver of this section by a landlord and tenant, by contract or otherwise, shall be void and unenforceable.  The tenant shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $1,000, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of this section, unless the landlord falls under the exception in subdivision 2.  The remedy provided under this paragraph is in addition to and shall not limit other rights or remedies available to landlords and tenants.

 

Sec. 13.  [504B.153] TENANT ABANDONMENT OF DWELLING.

 

Subdivision 1.  Abandonment.  (a) If a residential tenant abandons a dwelling unit during the lease term, the landlord shall make reasonable efforts to rent it at a fair rental value.  If the landlord rents the dwelling unit for a term beginning before the expiration of the rental agreement, the agreement is terminated on the date the new tenancy begins.  The rental agreement is terminated by the landlord on the date the landlord has notice of the abandonment if the landlord fails to use reasonable efforts to rent the dwelling unit at a fair rental value or if the landlord accepts the abandonment as a surrender.  The tenant shall not be liable for rent after the termination of the tenancy.

 

(b) If the rental agreement was for a periodic tenancy or tenancy at will, the maximum rent liability for the tenant is the notice period required to end the lease from the date the landlord has notice of the abandonment.


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Subd. 2.  Waiver prohibited.  Any waiver of the rights provided by this section shall be void and unenforceable.

 

Sec. 14.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 504B.161, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Requirements.  (a) In every lease or license of residential premises, the landlord or licensor covenants:

 

(1) that the premises and all common areas are fit for the use as advertised or promised by the landlord or licensor, or otherwise intended by the parties;

 

(2) to keep the premises and all common areas in reasonable repair during the term of the lease or license, including services and conditions listed in section 504B.381, subdivision 1, and extermination of insects, rodents, vermin, or other pests on the premises, except when the disrepair has been caused by the willful, malicious, or irresponsible conduct of the tenant or licensee or a person under the direction or control of the tenant or licensee;

 

(3) to make the premises and all common areas reasonably energy efficient by installing weatherstripping, caulking, storm windows, and storm doors when any such measure will result in energy procurement cost savings, based on current and projected average residential energy costs in Minnesota, that will exceed the cost of implementing that measure, including interest, amortized over the ten-year period following the incurring of the cost;

 

(4) to maintain the premises and all common areas in compliance with the applicable health and safety laws of the United States, of the state, and of the local units of government, including ordinances regulating rental licensing, where the premises are located during the term of the lease or license, except when violation of the health and safety laws has been caused by the willful, malicious, or irresponsible conduct of the tenant or licensee or a person under the direction or control of the tenant or licensee; and

 

(5) to supply or furnish heat at a minimum temperature of 68 degrees Fahrenheit from October 1 through April 30, unless a utility company requires and instructs the heat to be reduced.

 

(b) The parties to a lease or license of residential premises may not waive or modify the covenants imposed by this section.

 

Sec. 15.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.161, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Tenant maintenance.  The landlord or licensor may agree with the tenant or licensee that the tenant or licensee is to perform specified repairs or maintenance, including snow removal and maintenance of the lawn and premises, but only if the agreement is supported by adequate consideration and the consideration is specifically set forth in a conspicuous writing.  No such agreement, however, may waive the provisions of subdivision 1 or relieve the landlord or licensor of the duty to maintain common areas of the premises.

 

Sec. 16.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.161, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Covenants are in addition.  The covenants contained in this section are in addition to any covenants or conditions imposed by law or ordinance or by the terms of the lease or license and do not limit other rights or remedies which may be available to the residential tenant and landlord.


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Sec. 17.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.161, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 7.  Remedies.  If a landlord is in violation of this section, the tenant shall be entitled to:

 

(1) treble, actual, and consequential damages, based on rent abatement for impairment of use and enjoyment of the property for the period of the violation under section 541.05, subdivision 1, and consequential damages, or $500, whichever is greater;

 

(2) in the case of a residential building or residential unit that has been condemned for city or county housing code or rental licensing violations, treble, actual, and consequential damages, based on the total rent for the period of the violation under section 541.05, subdivision 1, and consequential damages, or $500, whichever is greater;

 

(3) in the case of violation of subdivision 2, treble, actual, and consequential damages, based on adequate consideration for services performed by the tenant for the period of the violation under section 541.05, subdivision 1, and consequential damages, or $500, whichever is greater;

 

(4) treble, actual, and consequential damages or $500, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of this section;

 

(5) correction of violations by the landlord;

 

(6) at the tenant's option, full rescission of the lease and recovery of any damage deposit, less any amount retained under section 504B.178;

 

(7) costs, disbursements, and reasonable attorney fees related to enforcement of this section; and

 

(8) at the tenant's option, collection of awards under this subdivision as a credit against current and future rents from the landlord.

 

Sec. 18.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.161, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 8.  Enforcement.  A residential tenant may enforce the provisions of this section in actions under sections 504B.281 to 504B.371, 504B.381, 504B.385, and 504B.395 to 504B.471, and other civil actions.

 

Sec. 19.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.161, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 9.  Waiver prohibited.  Any attempted waiver of this section by a landlord and tenant, by contract or otherwise, shall be void and unenforceable.

 

Sec. 20.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.173, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Remedies.  (a) In addition to any other remedies, a landlord who violates this section is liable to the applicant for the applicant screening fee plus a civil penalty of up to $100, civil court filing costs, and reasonable attorney fees incurred to enforce this remedy. Any attempted waiver of this section by a landlord and tenant, by contract or otherwise, shall be void and unenforceable.  The tenant shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $1,000, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of this section.

 

(b) A prospective tenant who provides materially false information on the application or omits material information requested is liable to the landlord for damages, plus a civil penalty of up to $500, civil court filing costs, and reasonable attorney fees.


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Sec. 21.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.175, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Remedies.  In addition to any other remedies, a landlord who violates this section is liable to the payor of the prelease deposit for the amount of the deposit paid, plus one-half of that amount as a penalty.  A landlord who enters into a rental agreement with a tenant is not liable under this section unless the landlord failed to comply with subdivision 3. Any attempted waiver of this section by a landlord and tenant, by contract or otherwise, shall be void and unenforceable.  The tenant shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $1,000, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of this section, and at the tenant's option, full rescission of the lease and recovery of any damage deposit less any amount retained under section 504B.178.

 

Sec. 22.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.177, is amended to read:

 

504B.177 LATE FEES.

 

(a) A landlord of a residential building may not charge a late fee if the rent is paid after the due date, unless the tenant and landlord have agreed in writing that a late fee may be imposed.  The agreement must specify when the late fee will be imposed.  In no case may the late fee exceed eight percent of the overdue rent payment.  Any late fee charged or collected is not considered to be either interest or liquidated damages.  For purposes of this paragraph, the "due date" does not include a date, earlier than the date contained in the written or oral lease by which, if the rent is paid, the tenant earns a discount.

 

(b) Notwithstanding paragraph (a), if a federal statute, regulation, or handbook permitting late fees for a tenancy subsidized under a federal program conflicts with paragraph (a), then the landlord may publish and implement a late payment fee schedule that complies with the federal statute, regulation, or handbook.

 

(c) Any attempted waiver of this section by a landlord and tenant, by contract or otherwise, shall be void and unenforceable.  The tenant shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $1,000, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of this section.  This section shall be liberally construed for the protection of tenants.

 

Sec. 23.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.178, subdivision 7, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 7.  Bad faith retention.  The bad faith retention by a landlord of a deposit, the interest thereon, or any portion thereof, in violation of this section shall subject the landlord to punitive damages not to exceed $500 $750 for each deposit in addition to the damages provided in subdivision 4 and reasonable attorney fees.  If the landlord has failed to comply with the provisions of subdivision 3 or 5, retention of a deposit shall be presumed to be in bad faith unless the landlord returns the deposit within two weeks after the commencement of any action for the recovery of the deposit.

 

Sec. 24.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.178, subdivision 10, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 10.  Waiver.  Any attempted waiver of this section by a landlord and tenant, by contract or otherwise, shall be void and unenforceable.  This section shall be liberally construed for the protection of tenants.

 

Sec. 25.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.181, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 7.  Waiver prohibited.  Any attempted waiver of this section by a landlord and tenant, by contract or otherwise, shall be void and unenforceable.  The tenant shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $500, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of this section.  This section shall be liberally construed for the protection of tenants.


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Sec. 26.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.185, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Notice.  (a) After the local authority has inspected the residential building under subdivision 1, the inspector shall inform the landlord or the landlord's agent and the residential tenant or housing-related neighborhood organization in writing of any code violations discovered and a reasonable deadline for correcting violations.

 

(b) A reasonable period of time must be allowed in which to The landlord shall correct the violations by the deadline given by the local authority.

 

Sec. 27.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.185, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Remedies.  Any attempted waiver of this section by a landlord and tenant, by contract or otherwise, shall be void and unenforceable.  The tenant shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $1,000, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of this section.  This section shall be liberally construed for the protection of tenants.

 

Sec. 28.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.195, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Disclosure to tenant.  (a) Except as provided in subdivision 3, A landlord, agent, or person acting under the landlord's direction or control shall provide a copy of all outstanding inspection orders for which a citation has been issued, issued in the previous 12 months pertaining to a rental unit or common area, specifying code violations issued under section 504B.185, that the housing inspector identifies as requiring notice because the violations threaten the health or safety of the tenant, all notices of rental license denials, violations, suspensions, and terminations, and all outstanding condemnation orders and declarations that the premises are unfit for human habitation to:

 

(1) a tenant, either by delivery or by United States mail, postage prepaid, within 72 hours after issuance of the citation;

 

(2) a person before signing a lease or paying rent or a security deposit to begin a new tenancy; and

 

(3) a person prior to obtaining new ownership of the property subject to the order or declaration.  The housing inspector shall indicate on the inspection order whether the violation threatens the health or safety of a tenant or prospective tenant.

 

(b) If an inspection order, for which a citation has been issued, does not involve code violations that threaten the health or safety of the tenants, the landlord, agent, or person acting under the landlord's control shall post a summary of the inspection order in a conspicuous place in each building affected by the inspection order, along with a notice that the inspection order will be made available by the landlord for review, upon a request of a tenant or prospective tenant.  The landlord shall provide a copy of the inspection order for review by a tenant or a prospective tenant as required under this subdivision.

 

Sec. 29.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.195, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 2a.  Damages.  The tenant shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $1,000, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of this section.

 

Sec. 30.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.195, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Remedies additional.  The remedies provided in this section are in addition to and shall not limit other rights or remedies available to landlords and tenants.  Any provision, whether oral or written, of any lease or other agreement, whereby any provision of this section is waived by a tenant, is contrary to public policy and void.  A violation of this section violates section 504B.161.  This section shall be liberally construed for the protection of tenants.


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Sec. 31.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.204, is amended to read:

 

504B.204 ACTION FOR RENTAL OF CONDEMNED RESIDENTIAL PREMISES.

 

(a) A landlord, agent, or person acting under the landlord's direction or control may not accept rent or a security deposit for residential rental property from a tenant after the leased premises have been (1) condemned or declared unfit for human habitation, (2) ordered to be vacated due to violations of a housing, health, or fire code or rental licensing ordinance by the applicable federal, state, or local authority, if the tenancy commenced after the premises were condemned or declared unfit for human habitation, or (3) ordered to be vacated pursuant to a government taking.  If a landlord, agent, or a person acting under the landlord's direction or control violates this section, the landlord is liable to the tenant for actual damages and an amount equal to three times the amount of all money collected from the tenant after date of condemnation or declaration, plus costs and attorney fees.  A violation of this section violates section 504B.161.  This section shall be liberally construed for the protection of tenants.

 

(b) The remedies provided in this section are in addition to and shall not limit other rights or remedies available to landlords and tenants.  Any provision, whether oral or written, of any lease or other agreement, whereby any provision of this section is waived by a tenant, is contrary to public policy and void.

 

Sec. 32.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.205, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Residential tenant remedies.  A residential tenant may bring a civil action for a violation of this section and recover from the landlord $250 or actual damages, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney's fees. The tenant shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $1,000, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of this section.  A violation of this section violates section 504B.161.  This section shall be liberally construed for the protection of tenants.

 

Sec. 33.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.231, is amended to read:

 

504B.231 DAMAGES FOR OUSTER.

 

(a) If a landlord, an agent, or other person acting under the landlord's direction or control unlawfully and in bad faith removes, excludes, or forcibly keeps out a tenant from residential premises, the tenant may shall recover from the landlord actual and consequential damages, the greater of treble, actual, and consequential damages or $500, whichever is greater, $1,000, and reasonable attorney's attorney fees, and at the tenant's option, full rescission of the lease and recovery of any damage deposit less any amount retained under section 504B.178.  A landlord may not charge or collect rent for a month where the landlord has violated this section.  A violation of this section by the landlord is a violation of section 504B.161.

 

(b) The remedies provided in this section are in addition to and shall not limit other rights or remedies available to landlords and tenants.  Any provision, whether oral or written, of any lease or other agreement, whereby any provision of this section is waived by a tenant, is contrary to public policy and void.  The provisions of this section also apply to occupants and owners of residential real property which is the subject of a mortgage foreclosure or contract for deed cancellation and as to which the period for redemption or reinstatement of the contract has expired.  This section shall be liberally construed for the protection of tenants.

 

Sec. 34.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.261, is amended to read:

 

504B.261 PETS IN SUBSIDIZED DISABILITY ACCESSIBLE RENTAL HOUSING UNITS.

 

In a multiunit residential building, a tenant of a disability accessible unit, in which the tenant or the unit receives a subsidy that directly reduces or eliminates the tenant's rent responsibility, must be allowed to have two birds or one spayed or neutered dog or one spayed or neutered cat.  A renter under this section may not keep or have visits from


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an animal that constitutes a threat to the health or safety of other individuals, or causes a noise nuisance or noise disturbance to other renters.  The landlord may require the renter to pay an additional damage deposit in an amount reasonable to cover damage likely to be caused by the animal.  The deposit is refundable at any time the renter leaves the unit of housing to the extent it exceeds the amount of damage actually caused by the animal.  The tenant shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $1,000, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, and at the tenant's option, full rescission of the lease and recovery of any damage deposit less any amount retained under section 504B.178, for a violation of this section.  Any attempted waiver of this section by a landlord and tenant, by contract or otherwise, shall be void and unenforceable.  This section shall be liberally construed for the protection of tenants.

 

Sec. 35.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.265, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Remedies.  The personal representative of the tenant's estate shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $500, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of this section.  This section shall be liberally construed for the protection of tenants.

 

Sec. 36.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.271, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Landlord's punitive Damages.  If a landlord, an agent, or other person acting under the landlord's direction or control, in possession of a tenant's personal property, fails to allow the tenant to retake possession of the property within 24 hours after written demand by the tenant or the tenant's duly authorized representative or within 48 hours, exclusive of weekends and holidays, after written demand by the tenant or a duly authorized representative when the landlord, the landlord's agent or person acting under the landlord's direction or control has removed and stored the personal property in accordance with subdivision 1 in a location other than the premises, the tenant shall recover from the landlord punitive damages in an amount not to exceed twice the actual damages or $1,000, whichever is greater, in addition to actual damages, treble, actual, and consequential damages or $1,000, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney's attorney fees.

 

In determining the amount of punitive damages the court shall consider (1) the nature and value of the property; (2) the effect the deprivation of the property has had on the tenant; (3) if the landlord, an agent, or other person acting under the landlord's direction or control unlawfully took possession of the tenant's property; and (4) if the landlord, an agent, or other person under the landlord's direction or control acted in bad faith in failing to allow the tenant to retake possession of the property.

 

The provisions of this subdivision do not apply to personal property which has been sold or otherwise disposed of by the landlord in accordance with subdivision 1, or to landlords who are housing authorities, created, or authorized to be created by sections 469.001 to 469.047, and their agents and employees, in possession of a tenant's personal property, except that housing authorities must allow the tenant to retake possession of the property in accordance with this subdivision.

 

Sec. 37.  [504B.276] LIMITATION ON CLAIM PRECLUSION.

 

A failure by a tenant to litigate an available claim or defense in any proceeding under sections 504B.281 to 504B.471 does not preclude the tenant from raising or litigating that claim or a claim arising out of the same transaction or occurrence in a separate proceeding.

 

Sec. 38.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.285, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 3a.  Damages.  The tenant shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $1,000, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of subdivisions 2 and 3.


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Sec. 39.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.315, is amended to read:

 

504B.315 RESTRICTIONS ON EVICTION DUE TO FAMILIAL STATUS.

 

(a) As used in this section, "familial status" has the meaning given it in section 363A.03, subdivision 18.

 

(b) No residential tenant of residential premises may be evicted, denied a continuing tenancy, or denied a renewal of a lease on the basis of familial status commenced during the tenancy unless one year has elapsed from the commencement of the familial status and the landlord has given the tenant six months prior notice in writing, except in case of nonpayment of rent, damage to the premises, disturbance of other tenants, or other material breach of the lease.

 

(c) The tenant shall recover from the landlord treble, actual, and consequential damages or $1,000, whichever is greater, and reasonable attorney fees, for a violation of this section.  The remedy provided under this section is in addition to and shall not limit other rights or remedies available to tenants.  Any provision, whether oral or written, of any lease or other agreement, whereby any provision of this section is waived by a tenant, is contrary to public policy and void.  This section shall be liberally construed for the protection of tenants.

 

Sec. 40.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 504B.375, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Unlawful exclusion or removal.  (a) This section applies to actual or constructive removal or exclusion of a residential tenant which may include the termination of utilities or the removal of doors, windows, or locks.  A residential tenant to whom this section applies may recover possession of the premises as described in paragraphs (b) to (e).

 

(b) The residential tenant shall present a verified petition to the district court of the judicial district of the county in which the premises are located that:

 

(1) describes the premises and the landlord;

 

(2) specifically states the facts and grounds that demonstrate that the exclusion or removal was unlawful, including a statement that no writ of recovery of the premises and order to vacate has been issued under section 504B.345 in favor of the landlord and against the residential tenant and executed in accordance with section 504B.365; and

 

(3) asks for possession.

 

(c) If it clearly appears from the specific grounds and facts stated in the verified petition or by separate affidavit of the residential tenant or the residential tenant's attorney or agent that the exclusion or removal was unlawful, the court shall immediately order that the residential tenant have possession of the premises.

 

(d) The residential tenant shall furnish security, if any, that the court finds is appropriate under the circumstances for payment of all costs and damages the landlord may sustain if the order is subsequently found to have been obtained wrongfully.  In determining the appropriateness of security, the court shall consider the residential tenant's ability to afford monetary security.

 

(e) The court shall direct the order to the sheriff of the county in which the premises are located and the sheriff shall execute the order immediately by making a demand for possession on the landlord, if found, or the landlord's agent or other person in charge of the premises.  If the landlord fails to comply with the demand, the officer shall take whatever assistance may be necessary and immediately place the residential tenant in possession of the premises.  If the landlord, the landlord's agent, or other person in control of the premises cannot be found and if


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there is no person in charge, the officer shall immediately enter into and place the residential tenant in possession of the premises.  The officer shall also serve the order and verified petition or affidavit immediately upon the landlord or agent, in the same manner as a summons is required to be served in a civil action in district court.

 

(f) The court administrator may charge a filing fee in the amount set for complaints and counterclaims in conciliation court, subject to the filing of an inability to pay affidavit.

 

(g) Any attempted waiver of this section by a landlord and tenant, by contract or otherwise, shall be void and unenforceable.  This section shall be liberally construed for the protection of tenants.

 

Sec. 41.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.391, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Noncompliance; fines and damages.  If the court finds that a landlord has willfully failed to comply with a court order to remedy a violation, the court shall fine the landlord and award damages to the tenant according to the following schedule:

 

(1) $250 fine and $250 in damages for the first failure to comply;

 

(2) $500 fine and $500 in damages for the second failure to comply with an order regarding the same violation; and

 

(3) $750 $1,000 fine and $1,000 in damages for the third and each subsequent failure to comply with an order regarding the same violation.

 

Sec. 42.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.395, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Who may bring action.  An action may be brought in district court by:

 

(1) a residential tenant of a residential building in which a violation, as defined in section 504B.001, subdivision 14, is alleged to exist;

 

(2) any housing-related neighborhood organization with the written permission of a residential tenant of a residential building in which a violation, as defined in section 504B.001, subdivision 14, clause (1) or (2), is alleged to exist;

 

(3) a housing-related neighborhood organization that has within its geographical area an unoccupied residential building in which a violation, as defined in section 504B.001, subdivision 14, clause (1) or (2), is alleged to exist; or

 

(4) a state, county, or local department or authority, charged with the enforcement of codes relating to health, housing, or building maintenance.

 

Sec. 43.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.395, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Landlord must be informed.  A landlord must be informed in writing of an alleged violation at least 14 days before an action is brought by:

 

(1) a residential tenant of a residential building in which a violation as defined in section 504B.001, subdivision 14, clause (2) or (3) clauses (2) to (5), is alleged to exist; or

 

(2) a housing-related neighborhood organization, with the written permission of a residential tenant of a residential building in which a violation, as defined in section 504B.001, subdivision 14, clause (2) clauses (2) to (5), is alleged to exist.  The notice requirement may be waived if the court finds that the landlord cannot be located despite diligent efforts."


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Delete the title and insert:

 

"A bill for an act relating to housing; amending provisions relating to residential housing leases; providing for landlord and tenant rights and obligations; making clarifying, technical, and conforming changes to landlord and tenant provisions; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 504B.001, subdivisions 5, 14, by adding a subdivision; 504B.101; 504B.111; 504B.115, subdivision 1; 504B.116; 504B.118; 504B.131; 504B.141; 504B.145; 504B.151, subdivision 1; 504B.161, subdivisions 2, 4, by adding subdivisions; 504B.173, subdivision 4; 504B.175, subdivision 4; 504B.177; 504B.178, subdivisions 7, 10; 504B.181, by adding a subdivision; 504B.185, subdivision 2, by adding a subdivision; 504B.195, subdivisions 1, 5, by adding a subdivision; 504B.204; 504B.205, subdivision 5; 504B.231; 504B.261; 504B.265, by adding a subdivision; 504B.271, subdivision 2; 504B.285, by adding a subdivision; 504B.315; 504B.391, subdivision 1; 504B.395, subdivisions 1, 4; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 504B.161, subdivision 1; 504B.375, subdivision 1; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 504B."

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Moller from the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 3599, A bill for an act relating to corrections; providing victim notice and input in end-of-confinement review process; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 244.052, subdivision 3; 611A.06, by adding a subdivision.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be placed on the General Register with the further recommendation that the bill be placed on the Consent Calendar.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Hansen, R., from the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 3617, A bill for an act relating to natural resources; modifying use of critical habitat private sector matching account; requiring reports; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84.943, subdivision 5, by adding subdivisions.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Ways and Means.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Klevorn from the Committee on State and Local Government Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 3677, A bill for an act relating to local government; authorizing counties to appropriate money to certain organizations to defray expenses of Veterans Day exercises; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 375.35.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Veterans and Military Affairs Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.


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Pryor from the Committee on Education Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 3744, A bill for an act relating to education; modifying the Read Act; establishing a working group; providing for supplemental funding; requiring reports; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 120B.1117; 120B.1118, subdivisions 4, 7, by adding subdivisions; 120B.12, subdivisions 1, 2a, 4, 4a; 120B.123, subdivisions 1, 5, by adding a subdivision; 120B.124, subdivision 1; 124D.42, subdivision 8; 124D.98, subdivision 5; Laws 2023, chapter 55, article 3, section 11, subdivisions 2, 4.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Delete everything after the enacting clause and insert:

 

"Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 120B.1117, is amended to read:

 

120B.1117 TITLE; THE READ ACT.

 

Sections 120B.1117 120B.118 to 120B.124 may be cited as the "Reading to Ensure Academic Development Act" or the "Read Act."

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 120B.1118, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Evidence-based.  "Evidence-based" means the instruction or item described is based on reliable, trustworthy, and valid evidence and has demonstrated a record of success in increasing students' reading competency in the areas of phonological and phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary development, reading fluency, and reading comprehension.  Evidence-based literacy instruction is explicit, systematic, and includes phonological and phonemic awareness, phonics and decoding, word study, spelling, fluency, vocabulary, oral language, and comprehension that can be differentiated to meet the needs of individual students.  Evidence-based instruction does not include the three-cueing system, as defined in subdivision 16.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 120B.1118, subdivision 7, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 7.  Literacy specialist.  "Literacy specialist" means a person licensed by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board as a teacher of reading, a special education teacher, or a kindergarten through grade 6 teacher, who has completed professional development approved by the Department of Education in structured literacy.  A literacy specialist employed by the department under section 120B.123, subdivision 7, or by a district as a literacy lead, is not required to complete the approved training before August 30, 2025.

 

Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 120B.1118, subdivision 10, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 10.  Oral language.  "Oral language," also called "spoken language," includes speaking and listening, and consists of five components:  phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics.  Oral language includes expressive sign language.

 

Sec. 5.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 120B.1118, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 18.  Word study.  "Word study" includes instruction in word analysis or syllables, structural analysis or morphemes, and etymology.


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Sec. 6.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 120B.12, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Literacy goal.  (a) The legislature seeks to have every child reading at or above grade level every year, beginning in kindergarten, and to support multilingual learners and students receiving special education services in achieving their individualized reading goals in order to meet grade level proficiency.  By the 2026-2027 school year, districts must provide evidence-based reading instruction through a focus on student mastery of the foundational reading skills of phonemic awareness, phonics, and fluency, as well as the development of oral language, vocabulary, and reading comprehension skills.  Students must receive evidence-based instruction that is proven to effectively teach children to read, consistent with sections 120B.1117 120B.118 to 120B.124.

 

(b) To meet this goal, each district must provide teachers and instructional support staff with responsibility for teaching reading with training on evidence-based reading instruction that is approved by the Department of Education by the deadlines provided in this subdivision.  The commissioner may grant a district an extension to the deadlines in this paragraph.  Beginning July 1, 2024, a district must provide access to the training required under section 120B.123, subdivision 5, to:

 

(1) reading intervention teachers working with students in kindergarten through grade 12;

 

(2) all classroom teachers of students in kindergarten through grade 3 and children in prekindergarten programs;

 

(3) special education teachers;

 

(4) curriculum directors; and

 

(5) instructional support staff who provide reading instruction; and

 

(6) (5) employees who select literacy instructional materials for a district.

 

(c) All other teachers and instructional staff required to receive training under the Read Act must complete the training no later than July 1, 2027.

 

(c) The following teachers and instructional staff must complete the training required under the Read Act by July 1, 2027:

 

(1) teachers who provide reading instruction to students in grades 4 to 12;

 

(2) teachers of multilingual students; and

 

(3) teachers who provide instruction to students who qualify for the graduation incentives program under section 124D.68.

 

(d) Districts are strongly encouraged to adopt a MTSS framework.  The framework should include a process for monitoring student progress, evaluating program fidelity, and analyzing student outcomes and needs in order to design and implement ongoing evidenced-based instruction and interventions.

 

Sec. 7.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 120B.12, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Identification; report.  (a) Twice per year, Each school district must screen every student enrolled in kindergarten, grade 1, grade 2, and grade 3 using a screening tool approved by the Department of Education three times each school year:  (1) within the first six weeks of the school year; (2) at midyear; and (3) within the last six weeks of the school year.  Students enrolled in kindergarten, grade 1, grade 2, and grade 3, including


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11614

multilingual learners and students receiving special education services, must be universally screened for mastery of foundational reading skills, including phonemic awareness, phonics, decoding, fluency, oral language, and for characteristics of dyslexia as measured by a screening tool approved by the Department of Education.  The screening for characteristics of dyslexia may be integrated with universal screening for mastery of foundational skills and oral language.  A district must submit data on student performance in kindergarten, grade 1, grade 2, and grade 3 on foundational reading skills, including phonemic awareness, phonics, decoding, fluency, and oral language to the Department of Education in the annual local literacy plan submission due on June 15.

 

(b) Students in grades 4 and above, including multilingual learners and students receiving special education services, who do not demonstrate mastery of foundational reading skills, including phonemic awareness, phonics, decoding, fluency, and oral language, must be screened using a screening tool approved by the Department of Education for characteristics of dyslexia, and must continue to receive evidence-based instruction, interventions, and progress monitoring until the students achieve grade-level proficiency.  A parent, in consultation with a teacher, may opt a student out of the literacy screener if the parent and teacher decide that continuing to screen would not be beneficial to the student.  In such limited cases, the student must continue to receive progress monitoring and literacy interventions.

 

(c) Reading screeners in English, and in the predominant languages of district students where practicable, must identify and evaluate students' areas of academic need related to literacy.  The district also must monitor the progress and provide reading instruction appropriate to the specific needs of multilingual learners.  The district must use an approved, developmentally appropriate, and culturally responsive screener and annually report summary screener results to the commissioner by June 15 in the form and manner determined by the commissioner.

 

(d) The district also must include in its literacy plan under subdivision 4a, a summary of the district's efforts to screen, identify, and provide interventions to students who demonstrate characteristics of dyslexia as measured by a screening tool approved by the Department of Education.  Districts are strongly encouraged to use the a MTSS framework.  With respect to students screened or identified under paragraph (a), the report must include:

 

(1) a summary of the district's efforts to screen for dyslexia;

 

(2) the number of students universally screened for that reporting year;

 

(3) the number of students demonstrating characteristics of dyslexia for that year; and

 

(4) an explanation of how students identified under this subdivision are provided with alternate instruction and interventions under section 125A.56, subdivision 1.

 

Sec. 8.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 120B.12, subdivision 2a, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2a.  Parent notification and involvement.  A district must administer a an approved reading screener to students in kindergarten through grade 3 within the first six weeks of the school year, at midyear, and again within the last six weeks of the school year.  Schools, at least biannually after administering each screener, must give the parent of each student who is not reading at or above grade level timely information about:

 

(1) the student's reading proficiency as measured by a screener approved by the Department of Education;

 

(2) reading-related services currently being provided to the student and the student's progress; and

 

(3) strategies for parents to use at home in helping their student succeed in becoming grade-level proficient in reading in English and in their native language.

 

A district may not use this section to deny a student's right to a special education evaluation.


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Sec. 9.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 120B.12, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Staff development.  (a) A district must provide training on evidence-based reading structured literacy instruction to teachers and instructional staff in accordance with subdivision 1, paragraph paragraphs (b) and (c).  The training must include teaching in the areas of phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary development, reading fluency, reading comprehension, and culturally and linguistically responsive pedagogy.

 

(b) Each district shall use the data under subdivision 2 to identify the staff development needs so that:

 

(1) elementary teachers are able to implement explicit, systematic, evidence-based instruction in the five reading areas of phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension with emphasis on mastery of foundational reading skills as defined in section 120B.1118 120B.119 and other literacy-related areas including writing until the student achieves grade-level reading and writing proficiency;

 

(2) elementary teachers have sufficient receive training to provide students with evidence-based reading and oral language instruction that meets students' developmental, linguistic, and literacy needs using the intervention methods or programs selected by the district for the identified students;

 

(3) licensed teachers employed by the district have regular opportunities to improve reading and writing instruction through professional development identified in the local literacy plan;

 

(4) licensed teachers recognize students' diverse needs in cross-cultural settings and are able to serve the oral language and linguistic needs of students who are multilingual learners by maximizing strengths in their native languages in order to cultivate students' English language development, including oral academic language development, and build academic literacy; and

 

(5) licensed teachers are well trained in culturally responsive pedagogy that enables students to master content, develop skills to access content, and build relationships.

 

(c) A district that offers early childhood programs, including voluntary prekindergarten for eligible four-year-old children, early childhood special education, and school readiness programs, must provide staff in early childhood programs sufficient training approved by the Department of Education to provide children in early childhood programs with explicit, systematic instruction in phonological and phonemic awareness; oral language, including listening comprehension; vocabulary; and letter-sound correspondence.

 

Sec. 10.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 120B.12, subdivision 4a, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4a.  Local literacy plan.  (a) Consistent with this section, a school district must adopt a local literacy plan to have every child reading at or above grade level every year beginning in kindergarten and to support multilingual learners and students receiving special education services in achieving their individualized reading goals.  A district must update and submit the plan to the commissioner by June 15 each year.  The plan must be consistent with the Read Act, and include the following:

 

(1) a process to assess students' foundational reading skills, oral language, and level of reading proficiency and the screeners used, by school site and grade level, under section 120B.123;

 

(2) a process to notify and involve parents;

 

(3) a description of how schools in the district will determine the targeted reading instruction that is evidence‑based and includes an intervention strategy for a student and the process for intensifying or modifying the reading strategy in order to obtain measurable reading progress;


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(4) evidence-based intervention methods for students who are not reading at or above grade level and progress monitoring to provide information on the effectiveness of the intervention;

 

(5) identification of staff development needs, including a plan to meet those needs;

 

(6) the curricula used by school site and grade level;

 

(7) a statement of whether the district has adopted a MTSS framework;

 

(8) student data using the measures of foundational literacy skills and mastery identified by the Department of Education for the following students:

 

(i) students in kindergarten through grade 3;

 

(ii) students who demonstrate characteristics of dyslexia; and

 

(iii) students in grades 4 to 12 who are identified as not reading at grade level; and

 

(9) the number of teachers and other staff that have completed training approved by the department.

 

(b) The district must post its literacy plan on the official school district website and submit it to the commissioner of education using the template developed by the commissioner of education beginning June 15, 2024.

 

(c) By March 1, 2024, the commissioner of education must develop a streamlined template for local literacy plans that meets the requirements of this subdivision and requires all reading instruction and teacher training in reading instruction to be evidence-based.  The template must require a district to report information using the student categories required in the commissioner's report under paragraph (d).  The template must focus district resources on improving students' foundational reading skills while reducing paperwork requirements for teachers.

 

(d) By December 1, 2025, the commissioner of education must submit a report to the legislative committees with jurisdiction over prekindergarten through grade 12 education summarizing the local literacy plans submitted to the commissioner.  The summary must include the following information:

 

(1) the number of teachers and other staff that have completed training approved by the Department of Education;

 

(2) the number of teachers and other staff required to complete the training under section 120B.12, subdivision 1, that have not completed the training;

 

(2) (3) by school site and grade, the screeners used at the beginning and end of the school year and the reading curriculum used; and

 

(3) (4) by school site and grade, using the measurements of foundational literacy skills and mastery identified by the department, both aggregated data and disaggregated data on student performance on the approved screeners using the student categories under section 120B.35, subdivision 3, paragraph (a), clause (2).

 

(e) By December 1, 2026, and December 1, 2027, the commissioner of education must submit updated reports containing the information required under paragraph (d) to the legislative committees with jurisdiction over prekindergarten through grade 12 education.


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Sec. 11.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 120B.123, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Approved screeners.  A district must administer an approved evidence-based reading screener to students in kindergarten through grade 3 within the first six weeks of the school year, at midyear, and again within the last six weeks of the school year.  The screener must be one of the screening tools approved by the Department of Education.  A district must identify any screener it uses in the district's annual literacy plan, and submit screening data with the annual literacy plan by June 15.

 

Sec. 12.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 120B.123, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Progress monitoring.  A district must implement progress monitoring using the approved assessments, as defined in section 120B.1118 120B.119, for a student not reading at grade level.

 

Sec. 13.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 120B.123, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Professional development.  (a) A district must provide training from a menu of approved evidence-based training programs to all reading intervention teachers, literacy specialists, and other teachers and staff identified in section 120B.12, subdivision 1, paragraph (b), by July 1, 2025; and by July 1, 2027, to other teachers in the district who provide reading instruction or reading interventions, prioritizing teachers who work with students with disabilities, English learners, and students who qualify for the graduation incentives program under section 124D.68.

 

(b) The commissioner of education may grant a district an extension to the deadlines in this subdivision.

 

(c) For the 2024-2025 school year only, the hours of instruction requirement under section 120A.41 for students in grades 1 through 3 is reduced to 929-1/2 hours for a district that enters into an agreement with the exclusive representative of the teachers requiring teachers to receive approved evidence-based training required under section 120B.12, subdivision 1, for 5-1/2 hours on a day when other students in the district receive instruction.  If a charter school's teachers are not represented by an exclusive representative, the charter school may reduce the number of instructional hours for students in grades 1 through 3 by 5-1/2 hours in order to provide teachers with evidence‑based training required under section 120B.12, subdivision 1, on a day when other students receive instruction.

 

Sec. 14.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 120B.123, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 8.  Special revenue fund.  (a) An account is established in the special revenue fund known as the "Read Act program account."  All amounts appropriated under Laws 2023, chapter 55, article 3, that are unobligated and unencumbered as of June 30, 2028, must be transferred to the Read Act program account.  Remaining unspent funds from previously obligated or encumbered appropriations under the Read Act cancel to the Read Act program account.

 

(b) Funds appropriated to implement the Read Act must be transferred to the Read Act program account in the special revenue fund.

 

(c) Money in the account is annually appropriated to the commissioner for curriculum, training, and other programming necessary to implement the Read Act.

 

Sec. 15.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 120B.124, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Resources.  The Department of Education must partner with CAREI for two years beginning July 1, 2023, until August 30, 2025 2027, to support implementation of the Read Act.  The department and CAREI must jointly:


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(1) identify at least five literacy curricula and supporting materials that are evidence-based or focused on structured literacy by January 1, 2024, and post a list of the curricula on the department website.  The list must include curricula that use culturally and linguistically responsive materials that reflect diverse populations and, to the extent practicable, curricula that reflect the experiences of students from diverse backgrounds, including multilingual learners, biliterate students, and students who are Black, Indigenous, and People of Color.  A district is not required to use an approved curriculum, unless the curriculum was purchased with state funds that require a curriculum to be selected from a list of approved curricula;

 

(2) identify at least three professional development programs that focus on the five pillars of literacy and the components of structured literacy by August 15, 2023, subject to final approval by the department.  The department must post a list of the programs on the department website.  The programs may include a program offered by CAREI.  The requirements of section 16C.08 do not apply to the selection of a provider under this section;

 

(3) identify evidence-based literacy intervention materials for students in kindergarten through grade 12;

 

(4) develop an evidence-based literacy lead training program that trains literacy specialists throughout Minnesota to support schools' efforts in screening, measuring growth, monitoring progress, and implementing interventions in accordance with subdivision 1;

 

(5) identify measures of foundational literacy skills and mastery that a district must report on a local literacy plan;

 

(6) provide guidance to districts about best practices in literacy instruction, and practices that are not evidence-based;

 

(7) develop MTSS model plans that districts may adopt to support efforts to screen, identify, intervene, and monitor the progress of students not reading at grade level; and

 

(8) ensure that teacher professional development options and MTSS framework trainings are geographically equitable by supporting trainings through the regional service cooperatives.; and

 

(9) develop training for volunteers in accordance with subdivision 4.

 

Sec. 16.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 120B.124, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Reconsideration.  (a) The department and CAREI must provide districts an opportunity to request that the department and CAREI add to the list of curricula or professional development programs a specific curriculum or professional development program.  The department must publish the request for reconsideration procedure on the department website.  A request for reconsideration must demonstrate that the curriculum or professional development program meets the requirements of the Read Act, is evidence-based, and has structured literacy components; or that the screener accurately measures literacy growth, monitors progress, and accurately assesses effective reading, including phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension.  The department and CAREI must review the request for reconsideration and approve or deny the request within 60 days.

 

(b) The department and CAREI must conduct a final curriculum review by August 1, 2024, to review intervention curriculum that is available to districts at no cost.

 

Sec. 17.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 120B.124, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Training for volunteers.  The Department of Education must partner with CAREI to identify or develop training for volunteers and other persons not employed by a district who provide literacy instruction or intervention to students in Minnesota school districts on a regular basis by January 10, 2025, subject to final approval by the department.  The training must be ten to 25 hours long.


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Sec. 18.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 120B.124, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Training for paraprofessionals.  The Department of Education must partner with CAREI to identify or develop training for paraprofessionals who assist in providing literacy instruction or interventions to students in Minnesota school districts on the key components of structured literacy instruction and interventions by November 1, 2024.  The training must be ten to 25 hours long.

 

Sec. 19.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 124D.42, subdivision 8, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 8.  Minnesota reading corps program.  (a) A Minnesota reading corps program is established to provide ServeMinnesota AmeriCorps members with a data-based problem-solving model of literacy instruction to use in helping to train local Head Start program providers, other prekindergarten program providers, and staff in schools with students in kindergarten through grade 3 to evaluate and teach early literacy skills, including evidence-based literacy instruction under sections 120B.1117 to 120B.124, to children age 3 to grade 3 and interventions for children in kindergarten to grade 12 3.

 

(b) Literacy programs under this subdivision must comply with the provisions governing literacy program goals and data use under section 119A.50, subdivision 3, paragraph (b).

 

(c) Literacy programs under this subdivision must use evidence-based reading instruction and interventions focused on structured literacy, and must provide training to ServeMinnesota AmeriCorps members that meets or exceeds the requirements of section 120B.124, subdivision 4, for volunteers.

 

(c) (d) The commission must submit a biennial report to the committees of the legislature with jurisdiction over kindergarten through grade 12 education that records and evaluates program data to determine the efficacy of the programs under this subdivision.

 

Sec. 20.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 124D.98, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Literacy incentive aid uses.  A school district must use its literacy incentive aid to support implementation of evidence-based reading instruction.  The following are eligible uses of literacy incentive aid:

 

(1) training for kindergarten through grade 3 teachers, early childhood educators, special education teachers, reading intervention teachers working with students in kindergarten through grade 12, curriculum directors, and instructional support staff that provide reading instruction, on using evidence-based screening and progress monitoring tools;

 

(2) evidence-based training using a training program approved by the Department of Education under the READ Act;

 

(3) employing or contracting with a literacy lead, as defined in section 120B.1118 120B.119;

 

(4) employing an intervention specialist;

 

(4) (5) screeners, materials, training, and ongoing coaching to ensure reading interventions under section 125A.56, subdivision 1, are evidence-based; and

 

(5) (6) costs of substitute teachers to allow teachers to complete required training during the teachers' contract day.; and

 

(7) stipends for teachers completing training required under section 120B.12.


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Sec. 21.  Laws 2023, chapter 55, article 3, section 11, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Read Act professional development.  (a) For evidence-based training on structured literacy for teachers working in school districts, charter schools, and cooperatives:

 

 

 

$34,950,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$0

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) Of the amount in paragraph (a), $18,000,000 is for the Department of Education and the regional literacy networks and $16,700,000 is for statewide training.  The department must use the funding to develop a data collection system to collect and analyze the submission of the local literacy plans and student-level universal screening data; establish the regional literacy networks as a partnership between the department and the Minnesota service cooperatives, and to administer statewide training based in structured literacy to be offered free to school districts and charter schools and facilitated by the regional literacy networks and the department.  The regional literacy networks must focus on implementing comprehensive literacy reform efforts based on structured literacy.  Each regional literacy network must add a literacy lead position and establish a team of trained literacy coaches to facilitate evidence-based structured literacy training opportunities and ongoing supports to school districts and charter schools in each of their regions.

 

(c) Of the amount in paragraph (a), $250,000 is for administration.

 

(d) If funds remain unspent on July 1, 2026, the commissioner must expand eligibility for approved training to include principals and other district, charter school, or cooperative administrators.

 

(e) The commissioner must report to the legislative committees with jurisdiction over kindergarten through grade 12 education the number of teachers from each district who received approved structured literacy training using funds under this subdivision, and the amounts awarded to districts, charter schools, or cooperatives.

 

(f) The regional literacy networks and staff at the Department of Education must provide ongoing support to school districts, charter schools, and cooperatives implementing evidence-based literacy instruction.

 

(g) This appropriation is available until June 30, 2028.  Any unspent funds do not cancel but are transferred to the Read Act program account in the special revenue fund.  The base for fiscal year 2026 and later is $7,750,000, of which $6,500,000 is for the regional literacy networks and $1,250,000 is for statewide training.

 

Sec. 22.  LITERACY COACHING PILOT PROGRAM.

 

The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board must partner with the Department of Education to develop literacy clinic models or alternative ways to evaluate whether teacher candidates who plan to work with children in prekindergarten programs, students in kindergarten through grade 5, or students receiving special education services understand foundational reading skills and apply structured literacy instruction before graduating from teacher preparation programs.  The board and the department must submit a joint report to the legislative committees with jurisdiction over kindergarten through grade 12 education by February 1, 2026.  The report must include findings and recommendations on effective ways to evaluate teacher candidates' understanding and application of structured literacy.

 

Sec. 23.  PELSB READING AUDIT REPORT.

 

(a) The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board must conduct an audit that evaluates whether and how approved teacher training programs for candidates for the following licensure areas meet subject matter standards for reading:

 

(1) early childhood education in accordance with Minnesota Rules, part 8710.3000;


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(2) elementary education in accordance with Minnesota Rules, part 8710.3200; and

 

(3) special education in accordance with Minnesota Rules, part 8710.5000.

 

(b) The board must submit an initial report with its findings to the legislative committees with jurisdiction over kindergarten through grade 12 education and higher education by January 15, 2025, and a final report by August 1, 2026.  Each report must:

 

(1) identify the reading standards for each licensure area, identify how they are aligned to the requirements of the READ Act, including requirements on evidence-based instruction, phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary development, reading fluency, and reading comprehension, and to the requirements of section 122A.092, subdivision 5;

 

(2) describe how the board conducted the audit;

 

(3) identify the results of the audit; and

 

(4) summarize the program effectiveness reports for continuing approval related to reading standards reviewed by the board, including the board determinations under Minnesota Rules, part 8705.2200.

 

Sec. 24.  READ ACT ACCESSIBILITY WORKING GROUP.

 

Subdivision 1.  Working group purpose.  The Department of Education must establish a working group to make recommendations to increase the accessibility of evidence-based literacy training and curriculum.

 

Subd. 2.  Members.  The Department of Education must appoint representatives from the Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement at the University of Minnesota; the Minnesota Commission of the Deaf, Deafblind, and Hard of Hearing; Minnesota State Academy for the Deaf; Minnesota State Academy for the Blind; Metro Deaf School; intermediate school districts; regional low-incidence facilitators; and teachers of students who are deaf, deafblind, or hard of hearing.

 

Subd. 3.  Report.  The working group must review curriculum and training approved under the Read Act and make recommendations for making evidence-based curriculum and training available to districts, charter schools, teachers, and administrators that meet the accessibility standards established under section 16E.03, subdivision 9.  The report must address how approved curriculum and training may be modified to improve accessibility and identify resources for improving the accessibility of curriculum and training.  The working group must post its report on the Department of Education website, and submit it to the legislative committees with jurisdiction over kindergarten through grade 12 education no later than January 15, 2025.

 

Subd. 4.  Administrative provisions.  The commissioner, or the commissioner's designee, must convene the initial meeting of the working group.  Members of the working group serve without compensation or payment of expenses.  The working group expires January 16, 2025, or upon submission of the report to the legislature under subdivision 3, whichever is earlier.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 25.  APPROPRIATION; SUPPLEMENTAL READ ACT FUNDING.

 

Subdivision 1.  Department of Education.  The sums indicated in this section are appropriated from the general fund to the Department of Education in the fiscal years designated.


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Subd. 2.  Read Act implementation.  (a) For transfer to the Read Act program account in the special revenue fund under section 120B.123:

 

 

 

$100,000,000

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) Of this amount, $23,000,000 is for payments to districts for substitute teachers to enable teachers to complete required training during the school day unless the teachers are compensated for time outside the school day to complete the training, and for incentives to teachers to complete an evidence-based professional development program approved under section 120B.124.  To be eligible for the payment, a teacher must have a license to teach in Minnesota; work for a school district, charter school, or cooperative; and complete an approved professional development program between July 1, 2024, and July 1, 2027.

 

(c) Of this amount, $10,000,000 is for the regional literacy networks to provide evidence-based training on structured literacy to teachers working in school districts, charter schools, and cooperatives, and faculty teaching literacy instruction at state-approved teacher preparation programs in Minnesota.

 

(d) Of this amount, $4,200,000 is to contract with CAREI for the Read Act implementation partnerships under section 120B.124.

 

(e) Of this amount, $3,000,000 is to partially reimburse school districts, charter schools, and cooperatives for approved evidence-based structured literacy curriculum and supporting materials, and intervention materials based on structured literacy purchased after July 1, 2023.  To be eligible for the partial reimbursement, a school district, charter school, or cooperative unit must purchase literacy curriculum and instructional materials that reflect diverse populations.  An applicant must apply for the reimbursement in the form and manner determined by the commissioner.  The commissioner must report to the legislative committees with jurisdiction over kindergarten through grade 12 education the districts, charter schools, and cooperative units that receive literacy grants under this paragraph and the amounts of each grant, by January 15, 2025, according to Minnesota Statutes, section 3.195.  The commissioner must, to the extent practicable, award grants in a regionally equitable manner.

 

(f) Of this amount, $1,000,000 is for the department to partner with CAREI to develop training for volunteers, and other persons not employed by districts who provide regular literacy instruction or intervention to students in Minnesota school districts, charter schools, or cooperative units.

 

Sec. 26.  REVISOR INSTRUCTION.

 

The revisor of statutes shall renumber each section of Minnesota Statutes listed in column A with the number listed in column B.  The revisor shall also make necessary cross-reference changes consistent with the renumbering.  The revisor shall also make any technical and other changes necessitated by the renumbering and cross-reference changes in this act.

 

 

Column A

Column B

 

 

120B.1117

120B.118

 

120B.1118

120B.119"


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Delete the title and insert:

 

"A bill for an act relating to education; modifying the Read Act; establishing a working group; providing for supplemental funding; requiring reports; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 120B.1117; 120B.1118, subdivisions 4, 7, 10, by adding a subdivision; 120B.12, subdivisions 1, 2, 2a, 4, 4a; 120B.123, subdivisions 1, 2, 5, by adding a subdivision; 120B.124, subdivisions 1, 2, by adding subdivisions; 124D.42, subdivision 8; 124D.98, subdivision 5; Laws 2023, chapter 55, article 3, section 11, subdivision 4."

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Education Finance.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Hansen, R., from the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 3791, A bill for an act relating to natural resources; providing for new electronic license system; making conforming changes; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 14.386; 84.027, subdivision 15; 84.0874; 84.152, subdivision 3; 84.788, subdivision 11; 84.798, subdivision 10; 84.8035, subdivision 1; 84.82, subdivisions 2a, 11; 84.8205; 84.83, subdivision 2; 84.922, subdivision 12; 85.41, subdivisions 1, 4; 85.45, subdivision 1; 85.46, subdivision 3; 86B.415, subdivision 11; 97A.015, subdivision 3a, by adding a subdivision; 97A.215, by adding a subdivision; 97A.255, subdivision 5; 97A.405, subdivisions 3, 4, 4a; 97A.420, as amended; 97A.445, by adding a subdivision; 97A.473, subdivisions 1, 3, 4, 5, 5a; 97A.474, subdivision 3; 97A.481; 97A.485, subdivision 6; 97A.535, subdivisions 1, 2, 2a, 4; 97A.551, subdivision 6; 97B.303; 97B.401; 97B.603; 97B.716, subdivision 2; 97B.721; 97C.087; 97C.301, subdivision 2a; 97C.355, subdivision 2; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 84.83, subdivision 3; 97A.405, subdivision 2; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 97A.015, subdivision 27a; 97A.485, subdivision 13.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Becker-Finn from the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 3925, A bill for an act relating to real property; providing for property insurance for grantee beneficiaries of transfer on death deeds; making technical, clarifying, and conforming changes to transfer on death deeds; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 507.071; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 507.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

      Fischer from the Committee on Human Services Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 3941, A bill for an act relating to human services; modifying home and community-based services standards; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 245D.071, subdivisions 3, 4; 245D.081, subdivisions 2, 3; 245D.09, subdivisions 3, 4.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11624

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 2, line 11, strike "meet" and insert "hold an initial planning meeting"

 

Page 7, delete section 6

 

Correct the title numbers accordingly

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Human Services Finance.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Hansen, R., from the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4015, A bill for an act relating to natural resources; providing for native rough fish; making conforming changes for aquatic farm licenses and taking and possessing fish; authorizing rulemaking; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 17.4983, subdivision 2; 17.4984, subdivision 2; 17.4988, subdivision 4; 17.4992, subdivisions 1, 3; 17.4996; 41A.02, subdivision 6; 84B.061; 97A.015, subdivisions 3b, 39, 43; 97A.075, subdivision 2; 97A.341, subdivision 1; 97A.421, subdivision 2; 97A.425, subdivision 4; 97A.475, subdivision 39; 97A.551, subdivision 2; 97B.055, subdivision 2; 97B.106; 97C.025; 97C.035, subdivision 3; 97C.045; 97C.081, subdivision 3a; 97C.211, subdivision 5; 97C.375; 97C.376, subdivisions 1, 5; 97C.381; 97C.385; 97C.391, subdivision 1; 97C.395, subdivision 2; 97C.505, subdivision 8; 97C.801, subdivision 2; 97C.805, subdivisions 1, 4; 97C.811, subdivision 2; 97C.831, subdivision 1; 97C.835, subdivisions 2, 3; 97C.865, subdivision 1; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 97B.037; 97C.041; 97C.371, subdivision 1.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 7, delete section 15

 

Page 9, line 4, strike "or" and after "fish" insert ", or common carp"

 

Page 9, line 5, after "fish" insert "or common carp"

 

Page 9, line 27, after "fish" insert "or common carp"

 

Page 12, line 20, after "FISH" insert "AND COMMON CARP"

 

Page 12, line 21, after "fish" insert "and common carp"

 

Page 14, line 16, after the first comma, insert "common carp,"

 

Page 16, line 2, after "whitefish" insert ", common carp," and after the second "whitefish" insert ", common carp,"

 

Page 16, line 8, before "and" insert "common carp,"

 

Page 16, line 12, before "and" insert "common carp,"


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Renumber the sections in sequence

 

Correct the title numbers accordingly

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Becker-Finn from the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4021, A bill for an act relating to human rights; making changes to provisions in the Minnesota Human Rights Act; providing for civil penalty and punitive damages; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 363A.03, subdivisions 12, 13, 18, 29; 363A.06, subdivision 4; 363A.07, subdivision 4; 363A.19; 363A.28, subdivision 5; 363A.29, subdivisions 1, 2; 363A.33, subdivision 1, by adding subdivisions; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 363A.02, subdivision 1; 363A.04; 363A.16, subdivision 1; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 363A.03, subdivision 3.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 2, line 24, delete everything after "means" and insert "residing with and caring for one or more individuals"

 

Page 2, line 25, delete everything before "who"

 

Page 7, after line 2, insert:

 

"Sec. 15.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 363A.33, subdivision 6, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 6.  District court jurisdiction.  Any action brought pursuant to this section shall be filed in the district court of the county wherein the unlawful discriminatory practice is alleged to have been committed or where the respondent resides or has a principal place of business.

 

A person bringing a civil action seeking redress for an unfair discriminatory practice or a respondent is entitled to a jury trial.

 

If the court or jury finds that the respondent has engaged in an unfair discriminatory practice, it shall issue an order or verdict directing appropriate relief as provided by this section 363A.29, subdivisions 3 to 6.

 

When the court issues an order providing for payment to the state of a civil penalty pursuant to this section 363A.29, subdivisions 3 to 6, it shall serve a copy of that order upon the attorney general at the same time as it makes service upon the parties."

 

Page 7, line 17, after the period, insert "In any case under this chapter that is decided by a jury, the jury shall determine the amount of all damages to be awarded."

 

Page 7, line 23, delete "subdivisions 3 to 6" and insert "this section"

 

Renumber the sections in sequence

 

Correct the title numbers accordingly

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

      The report was adopted.


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Stephenson from the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4040, A bill for an act relating to financial institutions; modifying registration provisions in the Minnesota Securities Act; modifying franchise fee deferral; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 80A.61; 80A.66; 80C.05, subdivision 3; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 80A.50.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 11, line 23, delete "advisor" and insert "adviser"

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Stephenson from the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4041, A bill for an act relating to commerce; adding and modifying various provisions governing financial institutions; making technical changes; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 47.20, subdivision 2; 47.54, subdivisions 2, 6; 48.24, subdivision 2; 58.02, subdivisions 18, 21, by adding a subdivision; 58.04, subdivisions 1, 2; 58.05, subdivisions 1, 3; 58.06, by adding subdivisions; 58.08, subdivisions 1a, 2; 58.10, subdivision 3; 58.115; 58.13, subdivision 1; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 58; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 58.08, subdivision 3.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 10, delete section 11 and insert:

 

"Sec. 11.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 58.05, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Certificate of exemption.  A person (a) The following persons must obtain a certificate of exemption from the commissioner to qualify as an exempt person under section 58.04, subdivision 1, paragraph (c), a financial institution under clause (2),:

 

(1) a bona fide nonprofit organization under section 58.04, subdivision 1, paragraph (c), clause (6); or

 

(2) a person exempted by order of the commissioner under section 58.04, subdivision 1, paragraph (c), clause (6); or (7).

 

(b) The following persons must obtain a certificate of exemption from the commissioner to qualify as an exempt person under section 58.04, subdivision 2, paragraph (b), as a financial institution under clause (4),:

 

(1) a bona fide nonprofit organization under section 58.04, subdivision 2, paragraph (b), clause (8); or

 

(2) a person exempted by order of the commissioner under section 58.04, subdivision 2, paragraph (b), clause (8) (9)."

 

Page 17, line 20, after "circumstances" insert "at the time of the application"


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Page 17, line 21, delete "and lender three days before" and insert "prior to" and delete the period and insert a semicolon

 

Page 17, delete lines 22 to 27

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Freiberg from the Committee on Elections Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4043, A bill for an act relating to redistricting; requiring the allocation of certain incarcerated persons based on their last known address in Minnesota; requiring the Department of Corrections to collect the last residential address of an inmate before incarceration; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 2; 241.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Delete everything after the enacting clause and insert:

 

"Section 1.  [2.93] INCARCERATED PERSONS IN DISTRICT PLANS.

 

Subdivision 1.  Definitions.  (a) For the purposes of this section, the definitions have the meanings given.

 

(b) "Commissioner" means the commissioner of corrections.

 

(c) "Director" means the director of the Legislative Coordinating Commission.

 

(d) "Legislative Coordinating Commission" means the Legislative Coordinating Commission established in section 3.303.

 

Subd. 2.  Reallocation and exclusion of incarcerated persons.  (a) For purposes of drawing congressional, legislative, and all other election districts, the legislature and local governments must use the population from the federal decennial census as modified by reallocating and excluding persons who are incarcerated.

 

(b) A person who was incarcerated in a state or federal correctional facility, as determined by the decennial census, and who has a last known address in Minnesota must be reallocated to the census block of the last known address.

 

(c) A person who was incarcerated in a state or federal correctional facility, as determined by the decennial census, and who has a last known address outside of Minnesota or does not have a last known address must:

 

(1) be excluded from the population count for purposes of drawing congressional, legislative, or political subdivision districts; and

 

(2) be counted as part of the statewide population total.


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Subd. 3.  Department of Corrections duties.  (a) On or before June 1 in a year ending in zero, the commissioner must provide to the director of the Legislative Coordinating Commission the following information, in electronic form, for each person incarcerated in a state correctional facility on April 1 in the year of the decennial census:

 

(1) a unique identifier that does not include the person's name, Department of Corrections identification number, or other identifying information;

 

(2) the street address of the correctional facility in which the person was incarcerated at the time of the report;

 

(3) the residential address of the person immediately prior to incarceration, if known, or if the person resided in an area lacking a specific physical address immediately prior to incarceration, a description of the physical location where the person regularly stayed immediately prior to being incarcerated;

 

(4) the following demographic information, if known:  the racial and ethnic information collected by the census and whether the person is over the age of 18; and

 

(5) any additional information the director of the Legislative Coordinating Commission deems necessary.

 

(b) Notwithstanding any law to the contrary, the commissioner must provide the director with access to the best available data necessary to conduct the reallocations and exclusions required by this section.

 

Subd. 4.  Federal correctional facilities.  By April 15 in a year ending in zero, the director must request each agency that operates a federal facility in Minnesota that incarcerates persons convicted of a criminal offense to provide the director with a report, including the information listed in subdivision 3.  The information must reflect the persons incarcerated in the federal facility on April 1 of that year.  If information is provided pursuant to this subdivision, the information must be provided by June 1 of the year ending in zero.  If information is not provided pursuant to this subdivision, persons incarcerated at federal facilities must be treated as having no known last address and must be excluded as provided in subdivision 2, paragraph (c).

 

Subd. 5.  Legislative Coordinating Commission duties.  (a) The director must reallocate and exclude people who are incarcerated in state or federal correctional facilities as provided in this subdivision and subdivision 2.  Within 30 calendar days of receiving the Public Law 94-171 data from the United States Census Bureau, the director must post the population counts that reflect all required reallocations and exclusions on the Legislative Coordinating Commission's website.

 

(b) The director must, in consultation with the commissioner, develop a standardized format and technical guidelines to be used in collecting addresses from incarcerated persons.  The commissioner must use this format and follow the guidelines in collecting addresses.  The commissioner and the director may enter a memorandum of understanding detailing the additional details regarding the methodology to be used and the format and manner in which the data will be provided.  Notwithstanding any law to the contrary, the commissioner must provide the director with access to the best available data necessary to conduct the reallocations and exclusions required by this section.

 

(c) Prior to reallocating and excluding incarcerated persons, the director must geocode addresses received from the commissioner.  When geocoding addresses, the director must accept an address that has an accuracy result of "rooftop" or "range interpolated."  The director must reject an address that has an accuracy result of "geometric center" or "approximate."  The director must only reallocate those addresses that are accepted pursuant to this paragraph.  The director must not reallocate any person at an address that was rejected but must instead count that person as part of the statewide population total.


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(d) The director must not disseminate data received pursuant to this section in any manner, except as explicitly required by state or federal law.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective January 1, 2030, and applies to population counts used for redistricting conducted on or after that date.

 

Sec. 2.  [241.062] COLLECTION OF INCARCERATED PERSON'S ADDRESS.

 

(a) As part of an incarcerated person's intake process, the commissioner of corrections must make all reasonable efforts to ensure that the information listed in section 2.93, subdivision 3, clauses (1) to (5), is collected and recorded.  The information must be collected in compliance with the format and guidelines developed pursuant to section 2.93, subdivision 5.  An incarcerated person who was participating in the Safe at Home program established in chapter 5B, has safety concerns about providing a last residential address, or has safety concerns for people residing at that address may decline to provide an address.

 

(b) The incarcerated person's last residential address and the information listed in section 2.93, subdivision 3, clauses (1) to (5), collected on intake and maintained by the commissioner are private data on individuals as defined in section 13.02, subdivision 12.

 

(c) Beginning in 2030, the commissioner must provide the information described in this section electronically to the director of the Legislative Coordinating Commission as required in section 2.93.

 

Sec. 3.  COLLECTION OF CURRENT INCARCERATED PERSON'S ADDRESS.

 

Prior to April 1, 2030, the commissioner of corrections must make reasonable efforts to collect from or confirm with each incarcerated person the following information:

 

(1) the residential address of the person immediately prior to incarceration or, if the person resided in an area lacking a specific physical address immediately prior to incarceration, a description of the physical location where the person regularly stayed immediately prior to being incarcerated; and

 

(2) the following demographic information:  the racial and ethnic information collected by the census and whether the person is over the age of 18.

 

This section only applies to an incarcerated person who was incarcerated prior to the date the commissioner started routinely collecting the information in clauses (1) and (2) as part of the intake process."

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Moller from the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4048, A bill for an act relating to corrections; modifying data sharing with prosecutor for petition for sentence adjustment; modifying correctional officer use of deadly force; clarifying use of electronic filing of detainer; authorizing Department of Corrections to disclose to victim the city and zip code of offender's residency or relocation after release from incarceration; discontinuing report to the legislature of disqualifying medical conditions related to challenge incarceration program; modifying membership of health care peer review committee; clarifying use of jail inspection data; providing medical director designee when medical director unavailable; providing for private victim input to Supervised Release Board; modifying date of probation report; providing a local advisory


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11630

board for input into development of comprehensive community supervision and probation services plans submitted for state funding; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 13.84, subdivision 6; 241.021, subdivision 4b; 241.75, subdivision 2; 243.52, subdivision 2; 611A.06, subdivision 3a; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 241.021, subdivision 1; 244.05, subdivision 5; 244.17, subdivision 3; 244.21, subdivision 2; 401.01, subdivision 2; 609.133, subdivision 4; 629.292, subdivision 2.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 9, line 24, after "statement" insert ", at the request of the victim"

 

Page 11, line 30, strike "Indeterminate Sentence" and insert "Supervised"

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Becker-Finn from the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4153, A bill for an act relating to civil law; requiring landlords to disclose that an assistance animal is not subject to a pet fee; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 504B.113, subdivision 3.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Housing Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Lee, F., from the Committee on Capital Investment to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4194, A bill for an act relating to housing; expanding eligible uses of housing infrastructure bonds; authorizing the issuance of additional housing infrastructure bonds; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 462A.37, by adding a subdivision; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 462A.37, subdivisions 1, 2, 5.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Housing Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Fischer from the Committee on Human Services Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4203, A bill for an act relating to human services; authorizing an informed choice and expedited service authorization for technology systems demonstration partnership for people receiving home and community-based services; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 256B.4905, by adding a subdivision.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Human Services Finance.

 

      The report was adopted.


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Liebling from the Committee on Health Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4210, A bill for an act relating to health; establishing requirements for hospital behavioral health crisis intervention teams; establishing a behavioral health crisis intervention grant program for hospitals; modifying provisions preventing violence against health care workers; requiring public disclosure of emergency department wait times; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 144.55, by adding a subdivision; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 144.566, subdivisions 10, 15, by adding subdivisions; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 144.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Delete everything after the enacting clause and insert:

 

"Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 144.55, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 3c.  Standards for emergency rooms.  A hospital must maintain a log of every patient who leaves its emergency department after checking in but before receiving care.  The patient log must document the reason the patient left, if known, and the length of time the patient waited before leaving or, if the length of time the patient waited is unknown, the length of time between the time the patient checked in and the time the hospital determined the patient left without receiving care.  The patient log required under this subdivision must be made available to the commissioner of health immediately upon request.  A copy of the patient log with all personally identifiable information removed, or summary data of the information in the patient log, must be made available to union representatives within 30 days of a request.

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 144.566, subdivision 10, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 10.  Safety training required.  A hospital must provide training to all health care workers employed or contracted with the hospital on safety during acts of violence.  Each health care worker must receive safety training during the health care worker's orientation and before the health care worker completes a shift independently, and annually thereafter.  Training must, at a minimum, include:

 

(1) safety guidelines for response to and de-escalation of an act of violence;

 

(2) ways to identify potentially violent or abusive situations, including aggression and violence predicting factors;

 

(3) the hospital's preparedness and incident response action plans for acts of violence, including how the health care worker may report concerns about workplace violence within each hospital's reporting structure without fear of reprisal, how the hospital will address workplace violence incidents, and how the health care worker can participate in reviewing and revising the plan; and

 

(4) any resources available to health care workers for coping with incidents of violence, including but not limited to critical incident stress debriefing or employee assistance programs.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 144.566, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 10a.  De-escalation training required.  (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d), a hospital must provide de-escalation training to all health care workers employed or under contract with the hospital.  For health care workers employed or under contract with the hospital as of July 1, 2024, the hospital must provide de-escalation


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11632

training by June 30, 2025.  For health care workers whose employment or contract with the hospital begins after July 1, 2024, the hospital must provide de-escalation training upon hire.  The de-escalation training must, at a minimum, include four hours of training covering the following topics:

 

(1) understanding violence in health care settings and violence-induced stress among health care workers;

 

(2) recognizing escalating aggression and techniques for de-escalating aggression and violence, including behavioral and logistical strategies;

 

(3) managing post-traumatic stress disorder;

 

(4) minimizing potentially violent situations through effective patient communication;

 

(5) effective whole-person and whole-family interventions;

 

(6) trauma-informed care;

 

(7) implicit bias and antiracism; and

 

(8) verbal and nonverbal communication techniques that diffuse tension and reduce emotional intensity.

 

(b) A hospital may create its own training course or may use an existing training course that meets the criteria in paragraphs (a) and (c).  A hospital is encouraged to use resources that utilize peer-reviewed, evidence-based standards.  A hospital must update its training annually to reflect best practices.

 

(c) Except as provided in paragraph (d), after the initial training, a hospital must provide at least two hours of de‑escalation training updates annually to all health care workers employed or under contract with the hospital.

 

(d) Health care workers who work remotely at least 95 percent of the time and do not interact with patients are exempt from the de-escalation training required under paragraphs (a) and (c).

 

Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 144.566, subdivision 15, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 15.  Legislative report required.  (a) Beginning January 15, 2026, the commissioner must compile the information submitted to the commissioner under subdivision 14 and the commissioner's evaluation of hospitals' compliance with section 144.567 into a single annual report and submit the report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees with jurisdiction over health care by January 15 of each year.

 

(b) This subdivision does not expire.

 

Sec. 5.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 144.566, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 18.  Reports of acts or threats of violence.  (a) When implementing the required reporting procedures under subdivision 7, all hospitals must provide a secure online portal through which health care workers can submit a report of a violent incident or threat of violence that occurred in the hospital or on hospital grounds.  Hospitals must retain all data submitted through the online portal for a minimum of seven years from the date on which the data were submitted. 


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(b) The data submitted through the online portal must be made available to appropriate hospital personnel and upon request to the commissioner of health.  A copy of data submitted through the online portal with all personally identifiable information removed or, if requested, summary data of the information submitted, must be made available to union representatives within 30 days of a request.

 

(c) The online portal must include data fields allowing a health care worker to submit:

 

(1) the date, time, and location of the act of violence or threat of violence;

 

(2) the names and job titles of all health care workers known by the submitting health care worker to have been victims of or witnesses to the act or threat of violence;

 

(3) the names and job titles of all health care workers known by the submitting health care worker to have responded to the act or threat of violence;

 

(4) a classification of the person engaged in the violent act or threat of violence;

 

(5) a description of the act or threat of violence;

 

(6) a description of the incident response;

 

(7) the nature and extent of any injuries known by the submitting health care worker to have been suffered by health care workers; and

 

(8) a description of the staffing levels at the time of the act or threat of violence and the submitting health care worker's opinion concerning whether staffing levels contributed to the incident.

 

Sec. 6.  [144.567] VIOLENCE INTERRUPTION INTERVENTION TEAMS.

 

Subdivision 1.  Violence interruption intervention teams required.  Except as provided in subdivision 4, by July 1, 2025, all hospitals must establish and maintain at least one violence interruption intervention team according to the requirements of this section.  At least one member of the violence interruption intervention team listed in subdivision 3 who is a licensed medical professional and authorized to administer all medications that may be required during a crisis intervention must be available on site at all times to respond promptly to any crisis that may escalate to violence or is violent and that occurs in the hospital.

 

Subd. 2.  Definitions.  (a) For the purposes of this section, the following terms have the meanings given.

 

(b) "Competency" means the ability of a health care worker to effectively demonstrate a set of attributes, such as personal characteristics, professional attitude, values, knowledge, and skills, and to fulfill the worker's professional responsibility through practice.  A competent person must possess these attributes, have the motivation and ability to use them, and effectively use them to provide safe, effective, and professional care to patients.

 

(c) "Crisis intervention" means face-to-face, short-term intensive mental health services initiated during a crisis where a patient's behavior may escalate to violence or is violent, to help a patient cope with immediate stressors, identify and utilize available resources and patient strengths, and begin to return to the patient's baseline level of functioning.  Crisis intervention does not include the use of violence, physical holds, mechanical restraints, or chemical restraints to immobilize a patient unless the physical hold, mechanical restraint, or chemical restraint is necessary to conduct a medical examination or treatment.


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(d) "Hospital" means a general acute care hospital licensed under sections 144.50 to 144.58.

 

(e) "Licensed medical professional" means one of the following, licensed by the profession's licensing board:  (1) a doctor of medicine or osteopathy; (2) a registered nurse; or (3) a practical nurse.

 

(f) "Licensed mental health professional" means a mental health professional who is qualified according to section 245I.04, subdivision 2.

 

Subd. 3.  Violence interruption intervention team.  (a) Each violence interruption intervention team must include at least four members, and all members must have completed the training required under subdivision 11.

 

(b) Each violence interruption intervention team must include at least:

 

(1) three licensed medical professionals who have competency in providing psychiatric care, of whom at least one must be a registered nurse and of whom at least one must be either an additional registered nurse or a licensed practical nurse;

 

(2) one licensed mental health professional who has experience and competency in responding to the needs of patients in mental health crisis; and

 

(3) any additional health care staff necessary to ensure the care needs can be met of a patient whose behavior may escalate to violence or is violent.

 

(c) Health care staff who are not members of the violence interruption intervention team:

 

(1) are not permitted to perform crisis interventions unless the team asks for assistance; and

 

(2) may support the violence interruption intervention team during a crisis.

 

(d) When scheduled to serve on the violence interruption intervention team, hospitals must not assign team members any duties or tasks that would prevent the team member from promptly responding to a crisis where behavior may escalate to violence or is violent and immediately participating in an intervention until the resolution of the crisis.

 

(e) A hospital must treat a response by violence interruption intervention team members as a supplemental emergency service and must not regard the presence of team members on a unit as a replacement for health care staff who would otherwise be assigned to the unit to provide care for the patient who is experiencing a crisis and whose behavior may escalate to violence or is violent, or any other patient on the unit.

 

Subd. 4.  Critical access hospitals.  A critical access hospital that does not have a behavioral health unit or mental health unit is not required to have a violence interruption intervention team that meets the requirements of subdivision 3, provided the critical access hospital has a staff person available at all times who:

 

(1) is a licensed medical professional;

 

(2) is authorized to administer all medications that may be required during a crisis intervention;

 

(3) completed the trainings required under subdivision 11 and section 144.566, subdivision 10a; and

 

(4) is able to provide crisis intervention as a violence interruption intervention team would.


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Subd. 5.  Violence interruption intervention.  (a) Hospital staff must seek assistance from the violence interruption intervention team when hospital staff believe that a patient is experiencing a crisis where the patient's behavior may escalate to violence or is violent or that a patient is at imminent risk of such a crisis.  Hospital staff may also seek assistance from the violence interruption intervention team when another person in the hospital or on the hospital grounds is experiencing a crisis where the person's behavior may escalate to violence or is violent, or is at imminent risk of such a crisis.

 

(b) A member of the violence interruption intervention team must respond promptly and in person to all requests for assistance from the team.

 

(c) For each crisis intervention, one violence interruption intervention team member must be designated the team lead.  The team lead must determine what intervention method is most appropriate and promptly organize an intervention plan.

 

Subd. 6.  Violence interruption intervention follow-up; violence interruption intervention team responsibilities.  After a crisis intervention, the violence interruption intervention team must conduct an informal debriefing to determine if:  (1) policies and procedures were followed prior to and during the intervention; (2) the best outcome for the patient was achieved; and (3) improvement to the intervention process is needed to better serve the needs of patients experiencing a crisis where the patient's behavior may escalate to violence or is violent.  The violence interruption intervention team may make recommendations to the hospital administration for improving crisis interventions in the future.

 

Subd. 7.  Violence interruption intervention follow-up; care team responsibilities.  (a) After a crisis intervention, the care team of the patient who experienced the crisis must review the patient's care plan and implement an updated person-centered care plan to minimize the chances of a recurrence of a crisis where the patient's behavior may escalate to violence or is violent.  When preparing the updated care plan, the care team must consult the patient's physician to determine if the patient's treatment plan needs to be adjusted.

 

(b) The patient's updated care plan must:

 

(1) address in observable and measurable terms where, when, and with whom the crisis occurred and determine if adjustments to the patient's care, care team, or environment are necessary to minimize known antecedents and triggers of the patient's prior crises where the patient's behavior was violent or was at risk of escalating to violence;

 

(2) include what interventions and strategies were previously implemented to prevent the patient from experiencing a crisis where the patient's behavior may escalate to violence or is violent and the efficacy of those interventions and strategies;

 

(3) provide recommendations on the best de-escalation strategies for the patient; and

 

(4) set a staffing level and patient status observation schedule for the patient to ensure the care plan is followed and the patient's needs are met in a timely manner.

 

(c) The care team must evaluate the patient's care plan at least weekly to ensure the care plan continues to be appropriate for the patient.

 

(d) The care team of the patient who experienced the crisis must ensure all care plans are appropriately transferred if the patient's care is transferred to other health care staff or to a different unit or facility.

 

Subd. 8.  Violence interruption intervention follow-up; hospital responsibilities.  After a crisis intervention, the hospital administration must:

 

(1) provide options for affected staff to leave their shift and return to work when they are fit to do so;


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(2) ensure the patient's electronic health record is modified to display a conspicuous notice alerting members of the patient's care team that the patient recently experienced a crisis requiring a response from the violence interruption intervention team, and ensure that this notice is removed from the patient's electronic health record once seven days elapse without the patient experiencing such a crisis;

 

(3) contact affected staff to provide support and referrals to employee assistance plans, mental health programs, and other available resources;

 

(4) conduct a thorough investigation of the circumstances precipitating the crisis, including staffing levels at the time of the crisis, and documenting direct care staff concerns about staffing levels;

 

(5) provide recommendations to the workplace violence prevention action plan team under section 144.566 for remedial action and remedies around staffing levels;

 

(6) review incidents, staffing levels, and documentation to ensure crisis prevention strategies are implemented and added to the workplace violence prevention action plan under section 144.566;

 

(7) submit a violence incident report to the workplace violence prevention action plan team under section 144.566; and

 

(8) submit to the workplace violence prevention action plan team any recommendations for improving crisis interventions in the future that the violence interruption intervention team may have submitted to the hospital administration under subdivision 6.

 

Subd. 9.  Required violence interruption intervention policies.  All hospitals must adopt and implement policies governing a violence interruption intervention team's response when hospital staff believe a patient is experiencing a crisis where the patient's behavior may escalate to violence or is violent or believe a patient is at imminent risk of such a crisis.  The violence interruption intervention policies must include the names or job titles of the hospital staff responsible for implementing the violence interruption intervention policies.  The violence interruption intervention policies must include procedures for:

 

(1) creating a violence interruption intervention team that meets the requirements of subdivision 3;

 

(2) identifying and assessing a patient's condition to determine the need for response or intervention by a violence interruption intervention team member;

 

(3) ambulance personnel to request that a violence interruption intervention team be available to assist when the ambulance arrives at the hospital;

 

(4) training all hospital staff to seek assistance from the violence interruption intervention team when appropriate or to call emergency services;

 

(5) training of violence interruption intervention team members that meet the requirements of subdivision 11;

 

(6) ensuring at least one member of the violence interruption intervention team listed in subdivision 3, who is a licensed medical professional and authorized to administer all medications that may be required during a crisis intervention, is available on site at all times to respond promptly to any crisis that occurs in the hospital where a patient's behavior may escalate to violence or is violent, including a requirement that a violence interruption intervention team member is not considered available if the team member has been assigned any duties or tasks that would prevent the team member from promptly responding to a crisis and immediately participating in an intervention until the resolution of the crisis;


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(7) a violence interruption intervention team's timely response to a request for assistance;

 

(8) evaluating a patient experiencing a crisis where the patient's behavior may escalate to violence or is violent, for substance use treatment and counseling and to provide guidance on that treatment and counseling;

 

(9) ensuring the provision of linguistically and culturally competent behavioral health crisis intervention services to patients;

 

(10) reporting concerns by hospital staff regarding the availability of violence interruption intervention team members and concerns regarding the availability, condition, storage, and maintenance of equipment; and

 

(11) coordinating implementation of the requirements of this section with the workplace violence prevention plan adopted by a hospital under section 144.566, including methods of reporting and investigating any incidents of workplace violence that result from a patient's crisis.

 

Subd. 10.  Required safety procedures.  All hospitals must adopt and implement safety procedures for situations in which the risk posed by a crisis where a patient's behavior may escalate to violence or is violent exceeds the ability of the violence interruption intervention team to safely intervene.  The safety procedures must be created by the violence interruption intervention team with input from direct patient care staff.  The safety procedures must include:

 

(1) mechanisms to provide appropriate intervention when health care staff are concerned about confronting a suspected perpetrator of abuse or concerned for their own safety, such as when a person is wielding a deadly weapon;

 

(2) standards for determining when and how to inform all impacted health care staff of potential life-threatening circumstances in the hospital; and

 

(3) standards for determining when to call security or law enforcement to respond to an incident.

 

Subd. 11.  Required training for violence interruption intervention team members.  (a) All hospitals must ensure that all members of a violence interruption intervention team receive training and education on a continuing annual basis to ensure competency in existing and new skills in psychiatric care, crisis intervention, substance use treatment services, providing trauma-informed care, and ensuring access to linguistically and culturally competent care. 

 

(b) The training and education required under this subdivision must include opportunities for interactive questions and answers between violence interruption intervention team members and a person knowledgeable about the hospital's violence interruption intervention policies.

 

(c) The training and education required under this subdivision must be conducted during the normal working hours of the participating team member unless the team member receives at least the normal hourly wage for any additional time spent in the training and education sessions.  Training must be conducted only when participating team members are not scheduled to provide patient care.

 

Subd. 12.  Violence interruption intervention program implementation requirements.  (a) All hospitals must designate as a violence interruption intervention director a licensed medical professional who:  (1) has experience and competence in psychiatric services; (2) is either a registered nurse or a physician; and (3) is responsible for the implementation of the requirements of this section. 


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(b) The violence interruption intervention director must ensure that the policies adopted under subdivisions 9 and 10 are developed, implemented, and annually reviewed with meaningful input and active involvement of the following hospital staff, including hospital staff with a recognized collective bargaining agent or agents:

 

(1) registered nurses who provide emergency medical services;

 

(2) registered nurses who provide psychiatric nursing care or provide care in a psychiatric unit, if any;

 

(3) psychiatrists and other physicians who provide inpatient psychiatric services or provide care in a psychiatric unit, if any;

 

(4) ancillary health care staff who provide inpatient psychiatric services or provide care in a psychiatric unit, including psychiatric technicians, if any;

 

(5) emergency medical technicians who serve the hospital;

 

(6) violence interruption intervention team members; and

 

(7) any other hospital staff required to be present in a patient care area who are reasonably anticipated to require a response by a violence interruption intervention team.

 

(c) The violence interruption intervention director must ensure that the programs implementing the training and education requirements under subdivisions 9 to 11 are developed, implemented, and annually reviewed and revised with meaningful input and active involvement of the hospital staff listed in paragraph (b), including the development of curricula and training materials.

 

(d) The violence interruption intervention director must ensure that the hospital's violence interruption intervention program is evaluated annually for effectiveness in providing timely access to crisis intervention services and reducing rates of workplace violence.  The violence interruption intervention director must ensure that the program evaluation is conducted with meaningful input and active involvement of the hospital staff listed in paragraph (b).

 

Subd. 13.  Enforcement.  (a) Notwithstanding section 144.55, the commissioner of health shall inspect hospitals for compliance with this section according to the schedule in section 144.653, subdivision 2.  The commissioner shall issue a correction order to the hospital if, upon inspection, the commissioner finds that the hospital was not in compliance with this section for three or more days.  The correction order shall state the deficiency, cite the specific rule violated, and specify the time allowed for correction. 

 

(b) If, upon reinspection, the commissioner finds that the hospital has not corrected deficiencies specified in the correction order, the commissioner shall issue a notice of noncompliance with a correction order stating all deficiencies not corrected and the provisions of section 144.653, subdivisions 6 to 9, apply.

 

Subd. 14.  Limited immunity.  (a) No individual employed to work in a hospital shall be subject to civil or criminal liability for engaging in conduct in good faith compliance with the hospital's procedures governing the hospital's violence interruption intervention program.

 

(b) No licensed medical professional or licensed mental health professional employed to work in a hospital shall be subject to professional disciplinary action, including censure, suspension, loss of license, loss of privileges, loss of membership, or any other penalty for engaging in conduct in good faith compliance with the hospital's procedures governing the hospital's violence interruption intervention program."


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Delete the title and insert:

 

"A bill for an act relating to health; establishing safety requirements for hospitals and violence intervention teams; requiring hospitals to have a secure online portal for reporting of violence incidents and threats of violence; requiring de-escalation training for all hospital health care workers; requiring a report; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 144.55, by adding a subdivision; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 144.566, subdivisions 10, 15, by adding subdivisions; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 144."

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Hornstein from the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4237, A bill for an act relating to transportation; designating a portion of marked U.S. Highway 169 between Taconite and Virginia as "Senator David J.  Tomassoni Memorial Cross Range Expressway"; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 161.14, by adding a subdivision.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Ways and Means.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Lee, F., from the Committee on Capital Investment to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4271, A bill for an act relating to housing; authorizing housing and redevelopment authorities to create public corporations for the purpose of purchasing, owning, and operating properties converted under the federal Rental Assistance Demonstration program; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 15.082; 469.012, subdivision 2j; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 469.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Housing Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Newton from the Committee on Veterans and Military Affairs Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4336, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; modifying prior appropriation for state veterans cemeteries; planning new veterans cemetery in northwestern Minnesota; amending Laws 2009, chapter 93, article 1, section 14, subdivision 3, as amended; Laws 2010, chapter 333, article 2, section 23, as amended.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

      The report was adopted.


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Newton from the Committee on Veterans and Military Affairs Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4344, A bill for an act relating to veterans; modifying provisions related to state soldiers assistance program education benefits; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 197.75, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 5; 197.791, subdivision 8; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 197.752.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Higher Education Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Pryor from the Committee on Education Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4361, A bill for an act relating to education; modifying provisions for teacher licensure; requiring reports; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 122A.091, subdivision 5; 122A.181, by adding a subdivision; 122A.182, by adding a subdivision; 122A.185, subdivision 3; 122A.20, by adding a subdivision; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 120B.117, subdivision 4; 122A.18, subdivision 1; 122A.181, subdivision 2; 122A.183, subdivision 2; 122A.184, subdivision 1; 122A.185, subdivision 1; 122A.40, subdivision 8; 122A.41, subdivision 5; 122A.631, subdivisions 2, 4; 122A.70, subdivision 2; Laws 2023, chapter 55, article 5, section 65, subdivision 7; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 122A.2451, subdivision 9; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 122A.185, subdivision 4.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Education Finance.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Fischer from the Committee on Human Services Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4366, A bill for an act relating to behavioral health; modifying civil commitment priority admission requirements; specifying that a prisoner in a correctional facility is not responsible for co-payments for mental health medications; allowing for reimbursement of county co-payment expenses; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 253B.10, subdivision 1; 641.15, subdivision 2.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Delete everything after the enacting clause and insert:

 

"ARTICLE 1

PRIORITY ADMISSIONS TO STATE-OPERATED TREATMENT PROGRAMS

 

Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 253B.10, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Administrative requirements.  (a) When a person is committed, the court shall issue a warrant or an order committing the patient to the custody of the head of the treatment facility, state-operated treatment program, or community-based treatment program.  The warrant or order shall state that the patient meets the statutory criteria for civil commitment.


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(b) The commissioner shall prioritize patients being admitted from jail or a correctional institution who are A person committed to the commissioner will be prioritized for admission to a medically appropriate direct care and treatment program based on the decisions of physicians in the executive medical director's office, using a priority admissions framework.  The framework must account for a range of factors for priority admission, including but not limited to:

 

(1) ordered confined in a state-operated treatment program for an examination under Minnesota Rules of Criminal Procedure, rules 20.01, subdivision 4, paragraph (a), and 20.02, subdivision 2 the length of time the person has been on a waiting list for admission to a direct care and treatment program;

 

(2) under civil commitment for competency treatment and continuing supervision under Minnesota Rules of Criminal Procedure, rule 20.01, subdivision 7 the intensity of the treatment the person needs, based on medical acuity;

 

(3) found not guilty by reason of mental illness under Minnesota Rules of Criminal Procedure, rule 20.02, subdivision 8, and under civil commitment or are ordered to be detained in a state-operated treatment program pending completion of the civil commitment proceedings; or the person's provisional discharge status;

 

(4) committed under this chapter to the commissioner after dismissal of the patient's criminal charges. the person's safety and safety of others in the person's current environment;

 

(5) whether the person has access to necessary treatment in a program that is not a direct care and treatment program;

 

(6) negative impacts of an admission delay on the facility referring the individual for treatment; and

 

(7) any relevant federal prioritization requirements.

 

Patients described in this paragraph must be admitted to a state-operated treatment program within 48 hours.  The commitment must be ordered by the court as provided in section 253B.09, subdivision 1, paragraph (d).

 

(c) Upon the arrival of a patient at the designated treatment facility, state-operated treatment program, or community-based treatment program, the head of the facility or program shall retain the duplicate of the warrant and endorse receipt upon the original warrant or acknowledge receipt of the order.  The endorsed receipt or acknowledgment must be filed in the court of commitment.  After arrival, the patient shall be under the control and custody of the head of the facility or program.

 

(d) Copies of the petition for commitment, the court's findings of fact and conclusions of law, the court order committing the patient, the report of the court examiners, and the prepetition report, and any medical and behavioral information available shall be provided at the time of admission of a patient to the designated treatment facility or program to which the patient is committed.  Upon a patient's referral to the commissioner of human services for admission pursuant to subdivision 1, paragraph (b), any inpatient hospital, treatment facility, jail, or correctional facility that has provided care or supervision to the patient in the previous two years shall, when requested by the treatment facility or commissioner, provide copies of the patient's medical and behavioral records to the Department of Human Services for purposes of preadmission planning.  This information shall be provided by the head of the treatment facility to treatment facility staff in a consistent and timely manner and pursuant to all applicable laws.

 

(e) Patients described in paragraph (b) must be admitted to a state-operated treatment program within 48 hours of the Office of Medical Director, under section 246.018, or a designee determining that a medically appropriate bed is available.  This paragraph expires on June 30, 2025.


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(f) A panel appointed by the commissioner, consisting of all members who served on the Task Force on Priority Admissions to State-Operated Treatment Programs under Laws 2023, chapter 61, article 8, section 13, subdivision 2, must review deidentified data quarterly for one year following the implementation of the priority admissions framework to ensure that the framework is implemented and applied equitably.  If the panel requests to review data that is classified as private or confidential and the commissioner determines the data requested is necessary for the scope of the panel's review, the commissioner is authorized to disclose private or confidential data to the panel under this paragraph and pursuant to section 13.05, subdivision 4, paragraph (b), for private or confidential data collected prior to the effective date of this paragraph.  The panel must also advise the commissioner on the effectiveness of the framework and priority admissions generally.  After the panel completes its year of review, a quality committee established by the Department of Direct Care and Treatment executive board will continue to review data and provide a routine report to the executive board on the effectiveness of the framework and priority admissions.

 

(g) The commissioner may immediately approve an exception to add up to ten civilly committed patients who are awaiting admission in hospital settings to the priority admissions waiting list for admission to medically appropriate direct care and treatment programs.  Admissions of these patients must be managed according to the priority admissions framework under paragraph (b).  This paragraph expires upon the commissioner's approval of the exception or on August 1, 2024, whichever is sooner.

 

ARTICLE 2

COMMUNITY BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SERVICES

 

Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 245.4905, is amended to read:

 

245.4905 FIRST EPISODE OF PSYCHOSIS GRANT PROGRAM.

 

Subdivision 1.  Creation.  The first episode of psychosis grant program is established in the Department of Human Services to fund evidence-based interventions for youth and young adults at risk of developing or experiencing a an early or first episode of psychosis and a public awareness campaign on the signs and symptoms of psychosis.  First episode of psychosis services are eligible for children's mental health grants as specified in section 245.4889, subdivision 1, paragraph (b), clause (15).  The Department of Human Services must seek to fund eligible providers of first episode of psychosis services and assist with program establishment throughout the state.

 

Subd. 2.  Activities.  (a) All first episode of psychosis grant programs must:

 

(1) provide intensive treatment and support for adolescents and young adults experiencing or at risk of experiencing a an early or first psychotic episode.  Intensive treatment and support includes medication management, psychoeducation for an individual and an individual's family, case management, employment support, education support, cognitive behavioral approaches, social skills training, peer support, family peer support, crisis planning, and stress management;

 

(2) conduct outreach and provide training and guidance to mental health and health care professionals, including postsecondary health clinicians, on early psychosis symptoms, screening tools, the first episode of psychosis program, and best practices;

 

(3) ensure access for individuals to first psychotic episode services under this section, including access for individuals who live in rural areas; and

 

(4) use all available funding streams.

 

(b) Grant money may also be used to pay for housing or travel expenses for individuals receiving services or to address other barriers preventing individuals and their families from participating in first psychotic episode services.


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Subd. 3.  Eligibility.  Program activities must be provided to people 15 to 40 years old with who have early signs of psychosis or who have experienced an early or first episode of psychosis.

 

Subd. 4.  Outcomes.  Evaluation of program activities must utilize evidence-based practices and must include the following outcome evaluation criteria:

 

(1) whether individuals experience a reduction in psychotic symptoms;

 

(2) whether individuals experience a decrease in inpatient mental health hospitalizations or interactions with the criminal justice system; and

 

(3) whether individuals experience an increase in educational attainment or employment.

 

Subd. 5.  Federal aid or grants.  (a) The commissioner of human services must comply with all conditions and requirements necessary to receive federal aid or grants.

 

(b) The commissioner must provide an annual report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees with jurisdiction over health and human services policy and finance, the senate Finance Committee, and the house of representatives Ways and Means Committee detailing the use of state and federal funds for the first episode of psychosis grant program, the number of programs funded, the number of individuals served across all grant-funded programs, and outcome and evaluation data.

 

Sec. 2.  [245.4908] EARLY EPISODE OF BIPOLAR DISORDER GRANT PROGRAM.

 

Subdivision 1.  Creation.  The early episode of bipolar disorder grant program is established in the Department of Human Services, to fund evidence-based interventions for youth and young adults at risk of developing or experiencing an early episode of bipolar disorder.  Early episode of bipolar disorder services are eligible for children's mental health grants as specified in section 245.4889, subdivision 1, paragraph (b), clause (15).  The Department of Human Services must seek to fund eligible programs throughout the state.

 

Subd. 2.  Activities.  (a) All early episode of bipolar grant program recipients must:

 

(1) provide intensive treatment and support for adolescents and young adults experiencing or at risk of experiencing early episode of bipolar disorder.  Intensive treatment and support includes medication management, psychoeducation for an individual and an individual's family, case management, employment support, education support, cognitive behavioral approaches, social skills training, peer and family peer support, crisis planning, and stress management;

 

(2) conduct outreach and provide training and guidance to mental health and health care professionals, including postsecondary health clinicians, on bipolar disorder symptoms, screening tools, the recipient's program, and best practices; and

 

(3) use all available funding streams.

 

(b) Grant money may also be used to pay for housing or travel expenses for individuals receiving services or to address other barriers preventing individuals and their families from participating in early episode of bipolar disorder services.

 

Subd. 3.  Service eligibility.  A grant recipient's program activities must be provided to individuals between 15 and 40 years of age who have early signs of or are experiencing bipolar disorder.


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Subd. 4.  Outcomes.  Evaluation of program activities must utilize evidence-based practices and must include the following outcome evaluation criteria:

 

(1) whether individuals experience a reduction in symptoms;

 

(2) whether individuals experience a decrease in inpatient mental health hospitalizations or interactions with the criminal justice system; and

 

(3) whether individuals experience an increase in educational attainment or employment.

 

Subd. 5.  Federal aid or grants.  (a) The commissioner of human services must comply with all conditions and requirements necessary to receive federal aid or grants.

 

(b) The commissioner must provide an annual report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees with jurisdiction over health and human services policy and finance, the senate Finance Committee, and the house of representatives Ways and Means Committee detailing the use of state and federal funds for the early episode of bipolar disorder grant program, the number of programs funded, the number of individuals served across all grant-funded programs, and outcome and evaluation data.

 

Sec. 3.  [253B.042] ENGAGEMENT SERVICES PILOT GRANTS.

 

Subdivision 1.  Creation.  The engagement services pilot grant program is established in the Department of Human Services, to provide grants to counties or certified community behavioral health centers to provide engagement services under section 253B.041.  Engagement services provide early interventions to prevent an individual from meeting the criteria for civil commitment and promote positive outcomes.

 

Subd. 2.  Allowable grant activities.  (a) Grantees must use grant funding to:

 

(1) develop a system to respond to requests for engagement services;

 

(2) provide the following engagement services, taking into account an individual's preferences for treatment services and supports:

 

(i) assertive attempts to engage an individual in voluntary treatment for mental illness for at least 90 days;

 

(ii) efforts to engage an individual's existing support systems and interested persons, including but not limited to providing education on restricting means of harm and suicide prevention, when the provider determines that such engagement would be helpful; and

 

(iii) collaboration with the individual to meet the individual's immediate needs, including but not limited to housing access, food and income assistance, disability verification, medication management, and medical treatment;

 

(3) conduct outreach to families and providers; and

 

(4) evaluate the impact of engagement services on decreasing civil commitments, increasing engagement in treatment, decreasing police involvement with individuals exhibiting symptoms of serious mental illness, and other measures.

 

(b) Engagement services staff must have completed training on person-centered care.  Staff may include but are not limited to mobile crisis providers under section 256B.0624, certified peer specialists under section 256B.0615, community-based treatment programs staff, and homeless outreach workers.


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Subd. 3.  Outcome evaluation.  The commissioner of management and budget must formally evaluate outcomes of grants awarded under this section, using an experimental or quasi-experimental design.  The commissioner shall consult with the commissioner of management and budget to ensure that grants are administered to facilitate this evaluation.  Grantees must collect and provide the information needed to the commissioner of human services to complete the evaluation.  The commissioner must provide the information collected to the commissioner of management and budget to conduct the evaluation.  The commissioner of management and budget may obtain additional relevant data to support the evaluation study pursuant to section 15.08.

 

Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 254B.04, subdivision 1a, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 1a.  Client eligibility.  (a) Persons eligible for benefits under Code of Federal Regulations, title 25, part 20, who meet the income standards of section 256B.056, subdivision 4, and are not enrolled in medical assistance, are entitled to behavioral health fund services.  State money appropriated for this paragraph must be placed in a separate account established for this purpose.

 

(b) Persons with dependent children who are determined to be in need of substance use disorder treatment pursuant to an assessment under section 260E.20, subdivision 1, or in need of chemical dependency treatment pursuant to a case plan under section 260C.201, subdivision 6, or 260C.212, shall be assisted by the local agency to access needed treatment services.  Treatment services must be appropriate for the individual or family, which may include long-term care treatment or treatment in a facility that allows the dependent children to stay in the treatment facility.  The county shall pay for out-of-home placement costs, if applicable.

 

(c) Notwithstanding paragraph (a), persons enrolled in medical assistance are eligible for room and board services under section 254B.05, subdivision 5, paragraph (b), clause (12).

 

(d) A client is eligible to have substance use disorder treatment paid for with funds from the behavioral health fund when the client:

 

(1) is eligible for MFIP as determined under chapter 256J;

 

(2) is eligible for medical assistance as determined under Minnesota Rules, parts 9505.0010 to 9505.0150;

 

(3) is eligible for general assistance, general assistance medical care, or work readiness as determined under Minnesota Rules, parts 9500.1200 to 9500.1318; or

 

(4) has income that is within current household size and income guidelines for entitled persons, as defined in this subdivision and subdivision 7.

 

(e) Clients who meet the financial eligibility requirement in paragraph (a) and who have a third-party payment source are eligible for the behavioral health fund if the third-party payment source pays less than 100 percent of the cost of treatment services for eligible clients.

 

(f) A client is ineligible to have substance use disorder treatment services paid for with behavioral health fund money if the client:

 

(1) has an income that exceeds current household size and income guidelines for entitled persons as defined in this subdivision and subdivision 7; or

 

(2) has an available third-party payment source that will pay the total cost of the client's treatment.


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(g) A client who is disenrolled from a state prepaid health plan during a treatment episode is eligible for continued treatment service that is paid for by the behavioral health fund until the treatment episode is completed or the client is re-enrolled in a state prepaid health plan if the client:

 

(1) continues to be enrolled in MinnesotaCare, medical assistance, or general assistance medical care; or

 

(2) is eligible according to paragraphs (a) and (b) and is determined eligible by a local agency under section 254B.04.

 

(h) When a county commits a client under chapter 253B to a regional treatment center for substance use disorder services and the client is ineligible for the behavioral health fund, the county is responsible for the payment to the regional treatment center according to section 254B.05, subdivision 4.

 

(i) Notwithstanding paragraph (a), persons enrolled in MinnesotaCare are eligible for room and board services under section 254B.05, subdivision 1a, paragraph (d).

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective January 1, 2025, or upon federal approval, whichever is later.  The commissioner of human services shall inform the revisor of statutes when federal approval is obtained.

 

Sec. 5.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 254B.05, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Rate requirements.  (a) The commissioner shall establish rates for substance use disorder services and service enhancements funded under this chapter.

 

(b) Effective for services rendered on or after January 1, 2025, the commissioner shall increase rates for residential services subject to this section by ... percent.  The commissioner shall adjust rates for such services annually according to the change from the midpoint of the previous rate year to the midpoint of the rate year for which the rate is being determined using the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Medicare Economic Index as forecasted in the fourth quarter of the calendar year before the rate year.  This paragraph does not apply to federally qualified health centers, rural health centers, Indian health services, certified community behavioral health clinics, cost-based rates, and rates that are negotiated with the county.

 

(c) For payments made under paragraph (b), if and to the extent that the commissioner identifies that the state has received federal financial participation for behavioral health services in excess of the amount allowed under Code of Federal Regulations, title 42, section 447.321, the state shall repay the excess amount to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services with state money and maintain the full payment rate under paragraph (b).

 

(d) Effective for services rendered on or after January 1, 2025, the commissioner shall increase capitation payments made to managed care plans and county-based purchasing plans to reflect the rate increase for residential services provided in paragraph (b).  Managed care and county-based purchasing plans must use the capitation rate increase provided under this paragraph to increase payment rates to behavioral health services providers.  The commissioner must monitor the effect of this rate increase on enrollee access to services provided under paragraph (b).  If for any contract year federal approval is not received for this paragraph, the commissioner must adjust the capitation rates paid to managed care plans and county-based purchasing plans for that contract year to reflect the removal of this provision.  Contracts between managed care plans and county-based purchasing plans and providers to whom this paragraph applies must allow recovery of payments from those providers if capitation rates are adjusted in accordance with this paragraph.  Payment recoveries must not exceed the amount equal to any increase in rates that results from this provision.


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(b) (e) Eligible substance use disorder treatment services include:

 

(1) those licensed, as applicable, according to chapter 245G or applicable Tribal license and provided according to the following ASAM levels of care:

 

(i) ASAM level 0.5 early intervention services provided according to section 254B.19, subdivision 1, clause (1);

 

(ii) ASAM level 1.0 outpatient services provided according to section 254B.19, subdivision 1, clause (2);

 

(iii) ASAM level 2.1 intensive outpatient services provided according to section 254B.19, subdivision 1, clause (3);

 

(iv) ASAM level 2.5 partial hospitalization services provided according to section 254B.19, subdivision 1, clause (4);

 

(v) ASAM level 3.1 clinically managed low-intensity residential services provided according to section 254B.19, subdivision 1, clause (5);

 

(vi) ASAM level 3.3 clinically managed population-specific high-intensity residential services provided according to section 254B.19, subdivision 1, clause (6); and

 

(vii) ASAM level 3.5 clinically managed high-intensity residential services provided according to section 254B.19, subdivision 1, clause (7);

 

(2) comprehensive assessments provided according to sections 245.4863, paragraph (a), and 245G.05;

 

(3) treatment coordination services provided according to section 245G.07, subdivision 1, paragraph (a), clause (5);

 

(4) peer recovery support services provided according to section 245G.07, subdivision 2, clause (8);

 

(5) withdrawal management services provided according to chapter 245F;

 

(6) hospital-based treatment services that are licensed according to sections 245G.01 to 245G.17 or applicable tribal license and licensed as a hospital under sections 144.50 to 144.56;

 

(7) adolescent treatment programs that are licensed as outpatient treatment programs according to sections 245G.01 to 245G.18 or as residential treatment programs according to Minnesota Rules, parts 2960.0010 to 2960.0220, and 2960.0430 to 2960.0490, or applicable tribal license;

 

(8) ASAM 3.5 clinically managed high-intensity residential services that are licensed according to sections 245G.01 to 245G.17 and 245G.21 or applicable tribal license, which provide ASAM level of care 3.5 according to section 254B.19, subdivision 1, clause (7), and are provided by a state-operated vendor or to clients who have been civilly committed to the commissioner, present the most complex and difficult care needs, and are a potential threat to the community; and

 

(9) room and board facilities that meet the requirements of subdivision 1a.

 

(c) (f) The commissioner shall establish higher rates for programs that meet the requirements of paragraph (b) (e) and one of the following additional requirements:


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(1) programs that serve parents with their children if the program:

 

(i) provides on-site child care during the hours of treatment activity that:

 

(A) is licensed under chapter 245A as a child care center under Minnesota Rules, chapter 9503; or

 

(B) is licensed under chapter 245A and sections 245G.01 to 245G.19; or

 

(ii) arranges for off-site child care during hours of treatment activity at a facility that is licensed under chapter 245A as:

 

(A) a child care center under Minnesota Rules, chapter 9503; or

 

(B) a family child care home under Minnesota Rules, chapter 9502;

 

(2) culturally specific or culturally responsive programs as defined in section 254B.01, subdivision 4a;

 

(3) disability responsive programs as defined in section 254B.01, subdivision 4b;

 

(4) programs that offer medical services delivered by appropriately credentialed health care staff in an amount equal to two hours per client per week if the medical needs of the client and the nature and provision of any medical services provided are documented in the client file; or

 

(5) programs that offer services to individuals with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorder problems if:

 

(i) the program meets the co-occurring requirements in section 245G.20;

 

(ii) 25 percent of the counseling staff are licensed mental health professionals under section 245I.04, subdivision 2, or are students or licensing candidates under the supervision of a licensed alcohol and drug counselor supervisor and mental health professional under section 245I.04, subdivision 2, except that no more than 50 percent of the mental health staff may be students or licensing candidates with time documented to be directly related to provisions of co-occurring services;

 

(iii) clients scoring positive on a standardized mental health screen receive a mental health diagnostic assessment within ten days of admission;

 

(iv) the program has standards for multidisciplinary case review that include a monthly review for each client that, at a minimum, includes a licensed mental health professional and licensed alcohol and drug counselor, and their involvement in the review is documented;

 

(v) family education is offered that addresses mental health and substance use disorder and the interaction between the two; and

 

(vi) co-occurring counseling staff shall receive eight hours of co-occurring disorder training annually.

 

(d) (g) In order to be eligible for a higher rate under paragraph (c) (f), clause (1), a program that provides arrangements for off-site child care must maintain current documentation at the substance use disorder facility of the child care provider's current licensure to provide child care services.


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(e) (h) Adolescent residential programs that meet the requirements of Minnesota Rules, parts 2960.0430 to 2960.0490 and 2960.0580 to 2960.0690, are exempt from the requirements in paragraph (c) (f), clause (4), items (i) to (iv).

 

(f) (i) Subject to federal approval, substance use disorder services that are otherwise covered as direct face-to-face services may be provided via telehealth as defined in section 256B.0625, subdivision 3b.  The use of telehealth to deliver services must be medically appropriate to the condition and needs of the person being served.  Reimbursement shall be at the same rates and under the same conditions that would otherwise apply to direct face‑to-face services.

 

(g) (j) For the purpose of reimbursement under this section, substance use disorder treatment services provided in a group setting without a group participant maximum or maximum client to staff ratio under chapter 245G shall not exceed a client to staff ratio of 48 to one.  At least one of the attending staff must meet the qualifications as established under this chapter for the type of treatment service provided.  A recovery peer may not be included as part of the staff ratio.

 

(h) (k) Payment for outpatient substance use disorder services that are licensed according to sections 245G.01 to 245G.17 is limited to six hours per day or 30 hours per week unless prior authorization of a greater number of hours is obtained from the commissioner.

 

(i) (l) Payment for substance use disorder services under this section must start from the day of service initiation, when the comprehensive assessment is completed within the required timelines.

 

Sec. 6.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 256.969, subdivision 2b, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2b.  Hospital payment rates.  (a) For discharges occurring on or after November 1, 2014, hospital inpatient services for hospitals located in Minnesota shall be paid according to the following:

 

(1) critical access hospitals as defined by Medicare shall be paid using a cost-based methodology;

 

(2) long-term hospitals as defined by Medicare shall be paid on a per diem methodology under subdivision 25;

 

(3) rehabilitation hospitals or units of hospitals that are recognized as rehabilitation distinct parts as defined by Medicare shall be paid according to the methodology under subdivision 12; and

 

(4) all other hospitals shall be paid on a diagnosis-related group (DRG) methodology.

 

(b) For the period beginning January 1, 2011, through October 31, 2014, rates shall not be rebased, except that a Minnesota long-term hospital shall be rebased effective January 1, 2011, based on its most recent Medicare cost report ending on or before September 1, 2008, with the provisions under subdivisions 9 and 23, based on the rates in effect on December 31, 2010.  For rate setting periods after November 1, 2014, in which the base years are updated, a Minnesota long-term hospital's base year shall remain within the same period as other hospitals.

 

(c) Effective for discharges occurring on and after November 1, 2014, payment rates for hospital inpatient services provided by hospitals located in Minnesota or the local trade area, except for the hospitals paid under the methodologies described in paragraph (a), clauses (2) and (3), shall be rebased, incorporating cost and payment methodologies in a manner similar to Medicare.  The base year or years for the rates effective November 1, 2014, shall be calendar year 2012.  The rebasing under this paragraph shall be budget neutral, ensuring that the total aggregate payments under the rebased system are equal to the total aggregate payments that were made for the same number and types of services in the base year.  Separate budget neutrality calculations shall be determined for


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payments made to critical access hospitals and payments made to hospitals paid under the DRG system.  Only the rate increases or decreases under subdivision 3a or 3c that applied to the hospitals being rebased during the entire base period shall be incorporated into the budget neutrality calculation.

 

(d) For discharges occurring on or after November 1, 2014, through the next rebasing that occurs, the rebased rates under paragraph (c) that apply to hospitals under paragraph (a), clause (4), shall include adjustments to the projected rates that result in no greater than a five percent increase or decrease from the base year payments for any hospital.  Any adjustments to the rates made by the commissioner under this paragraph and paragraph (e) shall maintain budget neutrality as described in paragraph (c).

 

(e) For discharges occurring on or after November 1, 2014, the commissioner may make additional adjustments to the rebased rates, and when evaluating whether additional adjustments should be made, the commissioner shall consider the impact of the rates on the following:

 

(1) pediatric services;

 

(2) behavioral health services;

 

(3) trauma services as defined by the National Uniform Billing Committee;

 

(4) transplant services;

 

(5) obstetric services, newborn services, and behavioral health services provided by hospitals outside the seven‑county metropolitan area;

 

(6) outlier admissions;

 

(7) low-volume providers; and

 

(8) services provided by small rural hospitals that are not critical access hospitals.

 

(f) Hospital payment rates established under paragraph (c) must incorporate the following:

 

(1) for hospitals paid under the DRG methodology, the base year payment rate per admission is standardized by the applicable Medicare wage index and adjusted by the hospital's disproportionate population adjustment;

 

(2) for critical access hospitals, payment rates for discharges between November 1, 2014, and June 30, 2015, shall be set to the same rate of payment that applied for discharges on October 31, 2014;

 

(3) the cost and charge data used to establish hospital payment rates must only reflect inpatient services covered by medical assistance; and

 

(4) in determining hospital payment rates for discharges occurring on or after the rate year beginning January 1, 2011, through December 31, 2012, the hospital payment rate per discharge shall be based on the cost-finding methods and allowable costs of the Medicare program in effect during the base year or years.  In determining hospital payment rates for discharges in subsequent base years, the per discharge rates shall be based on the cost-finding methods and allowable costs of the Medicare program in effect during the base year or years.

 

(g) The commissioner shall validate the rates effective November 1, 2014, by applying the rates established under paragraph (c), and any adjustments made to the rates under paragraph (d) or (e), to hospital claims paid in calendar year 2013 to determine whether the total aggregate payments for the same number and types of services under the rebased rates are equal to the total aggregate payments made during calendar year 2013.


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(h) Effective for discharges occurring on or after July 1, 2017, and every two years thereafter, payment rates under this section shall be rebased to reflect only those changes in hospital costs between the existing base year or years and the next base year or years.  In any year that inpatient claims volume falls below the threshold required to ensure a statistically valid sample of claims, the commissioner may combine claims data from two consecutive years to serve as the base year.  Years in which inpatient claims volume is reduced or altered due to a pandemic or other public health emergency shall not be used as a base year or part of a base year if the base year includes more than one year.  Changes in costs between base years shall be measured using the lower of the hospital cost index defined in subdivision 1, paragraph (a), or the percentage change in the case mix adjusted cost per claim.  The commissioner shall establish the base year for each rebasing period considering the most recent year or years for which filed Medicare cost reports are available, except that the base years for the rebasing effective July 1, 2023, are calendar years 2018 and 2019.  The estimated change in the average payment per hospital discharge resulting from a scheduled rebasing must be calculated and made available to the legislature by January 15 of each year in which rebasing is scheduled to occur, and must include by hospital the differential in payment rates compared to the individual hospital's costs.

 

(i) Effective for discharges occurring on or after July 1, 2015, inpatient payment rates for critical access hospitals located in Minnesota or the local trade area shall be determined using a new cost-based methodology.  The commissioner shall establish within the methodology tiers of payment designed to promote efficiency and cost‑effectiveness.  Payment rates for hospitals under this paragraph shall be set at a level that does not exceed the total cost for critical access hospitals as reflected in base year cost reports.  Until the next rebasing that occurs, the new methodology shall result in no greater than a five percent decrease from the base year payments for any hospital, except a hospital that had payments that were greater than 100 percent of the hospital's costs in the base year shall have their rate set equal to 100 percent of costs in the base year.  The rates paid for discharges on and after July 1, 2016, covered under this paragraph shall be increased by the inflation factor in subdivision 1, paragraph (a).  The new cost-based rate shall be the final rate and shall not be settled to actual incurred costs.  Hospitals shall be assigned a payment tier based on the following criteria:

 

(1) hospitals that had payments at or below 80 percent of their costs in the base year shall have a rate set that equals 85 percent of their base year costs;

 

(2) hospitals that had payments that were above 80 percent, up to and including 90 percent of their costs in the base year shall have a rate set that equals 95 percent of their base year costs; and

 

(3) hospitals that had payments that were above 90 percent of their costs in the base year shall have a rate set that equals 100 percent of their base year costs.

 

(j) The commissioner may refine the payment tiers and criteria for critical access hospitals to coincide with the next rebasing under paragraph (h).  The factors used to develop the new methodology may include, but are not limited to:

 

(1) the ratio between the hospital's costs for treating medical assistance patients and the hospital's charges to the medical assistance program;

 

(2) the ratio between the hospital's costs for treating medical assistance patients and the hospital's payments received from the medical assistance program for the care of medical assistance patients;

 

(3) the ratio between the hospital's charges to the medical assistance program and the hospital's payments received from the medical assistance program for the care of medical assistance patients;

 

(4) the statewide average increases in the ratios identified in clauses (1), (2), and (3);


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(5) the proportion of that hospital's costs that are administrative and trends in administrative costs; and

 

(6) geographic location.

 

(k) Effective for discharges occurring on or after January 1, 2024, the rates paid to hospitals described in paragraph (a), clauses (2) to (4), must include a rate factor specific to each hospital that qualifies for a medical education and research cost distribution under section 62J.692, subdivision 4, paragraph (a).

 

(l) Effective for services rendered on or after January 1, 2025, the commissioner shall increase payments for behavioral health services provided by hospitals paid on a diagnosis-related group methodology for hospital inpatient services by increasing the adjustment for behavioral health services under section 256.969, subdivision 2b, paragraph (e).

 

(m) Effective for services rendered on or after January 1, 2025, the commissioner shall increase capitation payments made to managed care plans and county-based purchasing plans to reflect the rate increase provided under paragraph (l).  Managed care and county-based purchasing plans must use the capitation rate increase provided under this paragraph to increase payment rates to behavioral health services providers.  The commissioner must monitor the effect of this rate increase on enrollee access to services described in paragraph (l).  If for any contract year federal approval is not received for this paragraph, the commissioner must adjust the capitation rates paid to managed care plans and county-based purchasing plans for that contract year to reflect the removal of this provision.  Contracts between managed care plans and county-based purchasing plans and providers to whom this paragraph applies must allow recovery of payments from those providers if capitation rates are adjusted in accordance with this paragraph.  Payment recoveries must not exceed the amount equal to any increase in rates that results from this provision.

 

Sec. 7.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 256B.0622, subdivision 2a, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2a.  Eligibility for assertive community treatment.  An eligible client for assertive community treatment is an individual who meets the following criteria as assessed by an ACT team:

 

(1) is age 18 or older.  Individuals ages 16 and 17 may be eligible upon approval by the commissioner;

 

(2) has a primary diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, major depressive disorder with psychotic features, other psychotic disorders, or bipolar disorder.  Individuals with other psychiatric illnesses may qualify for assertive community treatment if they have a serious mental illness and meet the criteria outlined in clauses (3) and (4), but no more than ten percent of an ACT team's clients may be eligible based on this criteria.  Individuals with a primary diagnosis of a substance use disorder, intellectual developmental disabilities, borderline personality disorder, antisocial personality disorder, traumatic brain injury, or an autism spectrum disorder are not eligible for assertive community treatment;

 

(3) has significant functional impairment as demonstrated by at least one of the following conditions:

 

(i) significant difficulty consistently performing the range of routine tasks required for basic adult functioning in the community or persistent difficulty performing daily living tasks without significant support or assistance;

 

(ii) significant difficulty maintaining employment at a self-sustaining level or significant difficulty consistently carrying out the head-of-household responsibilities; or

 

(iii) significant difficulty maintaining a safe living situation;


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(4) has a need for continuous high-intensity services as evidenced by at least two of the following:

 

(i) two or more psychiatric hospitalizations or residential crisis stabilization services in the previous 12 months;

 

(ii) frequent utilization of mental health crisis services in the previous six months;

 

(iii) 30 or more consecutive days of psychiatric hospitalization in the previous 24 months;

 

(iv) intractable, persistent, or prolonged severe psychiatric symptoms;

 

(v) coexisting mental health and substance use disorders lasting at least six months;

 

(vi) recent history of involvement with the criminal justice system or demonstrated risk of future involvement;

 

(vii) significant difficulty meeting basic survival needs;

 

(viii) residing in substandard housing, experiencing homelessness, or facing imminent risk of homelessness;

 

(ix) significant impairment with social and interpersonal functioning such that basic needs are in jeopardy;

 

(x) coexisting mental health and physical health disorders lasting at least six months;

 

(xi) residing in an inpatient or supervised community residence but clinically assessed to be able to live in a more independent living situation if intensive services are provided;

 

(xii) requiring a residential placement if more intensive services are not available; or

 

(xiii) difficulty effectively using traditional office-based outpatient services; or

 

(xiv) receiving services through a program that meets the requirements for the first episode of psychosis grant program under section 245.4905 and having been determined to need an ACT team;

 

(5) there are no indications that other available community-based services would be equally or more effective as evidenced by consistent and extensive efforts to treat the individual; and

 

(6) in the written opinion of a licensed mental health professional, has the need for mental health services that cannot be met with other available community-based services, or is likely to experience a mental health crisis or require a more restrictive setting if assertive community treatment is not provided.

 

Sec. 8.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 256B.0622, subdivision 3a, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3a.  Provider certification and contract requirements for assertive community treatment.  (a) The assertive community treatment provider must:

 

(1) have a contract with the host county to provide assertive community treatment services; and

 

(2) have each ACT team be certified by the state following the certification process and procedures developed by the commissioner.  The certification process determines whether the ACT team meets the standards for assertive community treatment under this section, the standards in chapter 245I as required in section 245I.011, subdivision 5, and minimum program fidelity standards as measured by a nationally recognized fidelity tool approved by the commissioner.  Recertification must occur at least every three years.


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(b) An ACT team certified under this subdivision must meet the following standards:

 

(1) have capacity to recruit, hire, manage, and train required ACT team members;

 

(2) have adequate administrative ability to ensure availability of services;

 

(3) ensure flexibility in service delivery to respond to the changing and intermittent care needs of a client as identified by the client and the individual treatment plan;

 

(4) keep all necessary records required by law;

 

(5) be an enrolled Medicaid provider; and

 

(6) establish and maintain a quality assurance plan to determine specific service outcomes and the client's satisfaction with services.

 

(c) The commissioner may intervene at any time and decertify an ACT team with cause.  The commissioner shall establish a process for decertification of an ACT team and shall require corrective action, medical assistance repayment, or decertification of an ACT team that no longer meets the requirements in this section or that fails to meet the clinical quality standards or administrative standards provided by the commissioner in the application and certification process.  The decertification is subject to appeal to the state.

 

Sec. 9.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 256B.0622, subdivision 7a, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 7a.  Assertive community treatment team staff requirements and roles.  (a) The required treatment staff qualifications and roles for an ACT team are:

 

(1) the team leader:

 

(i) shall be a mental health professional.  Individuals who are not licensed but who are eligible for licensure and are otherwise qualified may also fulfill this role but must obtain full licensure within 24 months of assuming the role of team leader;

 

(ii) must be an active member of the ACT team and provide some direct services to clients;

 

(iii) must be a single full-time staff member, dedicated to the ACT team, who is responsible for overseeing the administrative operations of the team, providing treatment supervision of services in conjunction with the psychiatrist or psychiatric care provider, and supervising team members to ensure delivery of best and ethical practices; and

 

(iv) must be available to provide ensure that overall treatment supervision to the ACT team is available after regular business hours and on weekends and holidays.  The team leader may delegate this duty to another and is provided by a qualified member of the ACT team;

 

(2) the psychiatric care provider:

 

(i) must be a mental health professional permitted to prescribe psychiatric medications as part of the mental health professional's scope of practice.  The psychiatric care provider must have demonstrated clinical experience working with individuals with serious and persistent mental illness;


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(ii) shall collaborate with the team leader in sharing overall clinical responsibility for screening and admitting clients; monitoring clients' treatment and team member service delivery; educating staff on psychiatric and nonpsychiatric medications, their side effects, and health-related conditions; actively collaborating with nurses; and helping provide treatment supervision to the team;

 

(iii) shall fulfill the following functions for assertive community treatment clients:  provide assessment and treatment of clients' symptoms and response to medications, including side effects; provide brief therapy to clients; provide diagnostic and medication education to clients, with medication decisions based on shared decision making; monitor clients' nonpsychiatric medical conditions and nonpsychiatric medications; and conduct home and community visits;

 

(iv) shall serve as the point of contact for psychiatric treatment if a client is hospitalized for mental health treatment and shall communicate directly with the client's inpatient psychiatric care providers to ensure continuity of care;

 

(v) shall have a minimum full-time equivalency that is prorated at a rate of 16 hours per 50 clients.  Part-time psychiatric care providers shall have designated hours to work on the team, with sufficient blocks of time on consistent days to carry out the provider's clinical, supervisory, and administrative responsibilities.  No more than two psychiatric care providers may share this role; and

 

(vi) shall provide psychiatric backup to the program after regular business hours and on weekends and holidays.  The psychiatric care provider may delegate this duty to another qualified psychiatric provider;

 

(3) the nursing staff:

 

(i) shall consist of one to three registered nurses or advanced practice registered nurses, of whom at least one has a minimum of one-year experience working with adults with serious mental illness and a working knowledge of psychiatric medications.  No more than two individuals can share a full-time equivalent position;

 

(ii) are responsible for managing medication, administering and documenting medication treatment, and managing a secure medication room; and

 

(iii) shall develop strategies, in collaboration with clients, to maximize taking medications as prescribed; screen and monitor clients' mental and physical health conditions and medication side effects; engage in health promotion, prevention, and education activities; communicate and coordinate services with other medical providers; facilitate the development of the individual treatment plan for clients assigned; and educate the ACT team in monitoring psychiatric and physical health symptoms and medication side effects;

 

(4) the co-occurring disorder specialist:

 

(i) shall be a full-time equivalent co-occurring disorder specialist who has received specific training on co-occurring disorders that is consistent with national evidence-based practices.  The training must include practical knowledge of common substances and how they affect mental illnesses, the ability to assess substance use disorders and the client's stage of treatment, motivational interviewing, and skills necessary to provide counseling to clients at all different stages of change and treatment.  The co-occurring disorder specialist may also be an individual who is a licensed alcohol and drug counselor as described in section 148F.01, subdivision 5, or a counselor who otherwise meets the training, experience, and other requirements in section 245G.11, subdivision 5.  No more than two co-occurring disorder specialists may occupy this role; and

 

(ii) shall provide or facilitate the provision of co-occurring disorder treatment to clients.  The co-occurring disorder specialist shall serve as a consultant and educator to fellow ACT team members on co-occurring disorders;


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(5) the vocational specialist:

 

(i) shall be a full-time vocational specialist who has at least one-year experience providing employment services or advanced education that involved field training in vocational services to individuals with mental illness.  An individual who does not meet these qualifications may also serve as the vocational specialist upon completing a training plan approved by the commissioner;

 

(ii) shall provide or facilitate the provision of vocational services to clients.  The vocational specialist serves as a consultant and educator to fellow ACT team members on these services; and

 

(iii) must not refer individuals to receive any type of vocational services or linkage by providers outside of the ACT team;

 

(6) the mental health certified peer specialist:

 

(i) shall be a full-time equivalent.  No more than two individuals can share this position.  The mental health certified peer specialist is a fully integrated team member who provides highly individualized services in the community and promotes the self-determination and shared decision-making abilities of clients.  This requirement may be waived due to workforce shortages upon approval of the commissioner;

 

(ii) must provide coaching, mentoring, and consultation to the clients to promote recovery, self-advocacy, and self-direction, promote wellness management strategies, and assist clients in developing advance directives; and

 

(iii) must model recovery values, attitudes, beliefs, and personal action to encourage wellness and resilience, provide consultation to team members, promote a culture where the clients' points of view and preferences are recognized, understood, respected, and integrated into treatment, and serve in a manner equivalent to other team members;

 

(7) the program administrative assistant shall be a full-time office-based program administrative assistant position assigned to solely work with the ACT team, providing a range of supports to the team, clients, and families; and

 

(8) additional staff:

 

(i) shall be based on team size.  Additional treatment team staff may include mental health professionals; clinical trainees; certified rehabilitation specialists; mental health practitioners; or mental health rehabilitation workers.  These individuals shall have the knowledge, skills, and abilities required by the population served to carry out rehabilitation and support functions; and

 

(ii) shall be selected based on specific program needs or the population served.

 

(b) Each ACT team must clearly document schedules for all ACT team members.

 

(c) Each ACT team member must serve as a primary team member for clients assigned by the team leader and are responsible for facilitating the individual treatment plan process for those clients.  The primary team member for a client is the responsible team member knowledgeable about the client's life and circumstances and writes the individual treatment plan.  The primary team member provides individual supportive therapy or counseling, and provides primary support and education to the client's family and support system.

 

(d) Members of the ACT team must have strong clinical skills, professional qualifications, experience, and competency to provide a full breadth of rehabilitation services.  Each staff member shall be proficient in their respective discipline and be able to work collaboratively as a member of a multidisciplinary team to deliver the majority of the treatment, rehabilitation, and support services clients require to fully benefit from receiving assertive community treatment.

 

(e) Each ACT team member must fulfill training requirements established by the commissioner.


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Sec. 10.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 256B.0622, subdivision 7b, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 7b.  Assertive community treatment program size and opportunities scores.  (a) Each ACT team shall maintain an annual average caseload that does not exceed 100 clients.  Staff-to-client ratios shall be based on team size as follows: must demonstrate that the team attained a passing score according to the most recently issued Tool for Measurement of Assertive Community Treatment (TMACT).

 

(1) a small ACT team must:

 

(i) employ at least six but no more than seven full-time treatment team staff, excluding the program assistant and the psychiatric care provider;

 

(ii) serve an annual average maximum of no more than 50 clients;

 

(iii) ensure at least one full-time equivalent position for every eight clients served;

 

(iv) schedule ACT team staff on weekdays and on-call duty to provide crisis services and deliver services after hours when staff are not working;

 

(v) provide crisis services during business hours if the small ACT team does not have sufficient staff numbers to operate an after-hours on-call system.  During all other hours, the ACT team may arrange for coverage for crisis assessment and intervention services through a reliable crisis-intervention provider as long as there is a mechanism by which the ACT team communicates routinely with the crisis-intervention provider and the on-call ACT team staff are available to see clients face-to-face when necessary or if requested by the crisis-intervention services provider;

 

(vi) adjust schedules and provide staff to carry out the needed service activities in the evenings or on weekend days or holidays, when necessary;

 

(vii) arrange for and provide psychiatric backup during all hours the psychiatric care provider is not regularly scheduled to work.  If availability of the ACT team's psychiatric care provider during all hours is not feasible, alternative psychiatric prescriber backup must be arranged and a mechanism of timely communication and coordination established in writing; and

 

(viii) be composed of, at minimum, one full-time team leader, at least 16 hours each week per 50 clients of psychiatric provider time, or equivalent if fewer clients, one full-time equivalent nursing, one full-time co-occurring disorder specialist, one full-time equivalent mental health certified peer specialist, one full-time vocational specialist, one full-time program assistant, and at least one additional full-time ACT team member who has mental health professional, certified rehabilitation specialist, clinical trainee, or mental health practitioner status; and

 

(2) a midsize ACT team shall:

 

(i) be composed of, at minimum, one full-time team leader, at least 16 hours of psychiatry time for 51 clients, with an additional two hours for every six clients added to the team, 1.5 to two full-time equivalent nursing staff, one full-time co-occurring disorder specialist, one full-time equivalent mental health certified peer specialist, one full-time vocational specialist, one full-time program assistant, and at least 1.5 to two additional full-time equivalent ACT members, with at least one dedicated full-time staff member with mental health professional status.  Remaining team members may have mental health professional, certified rehabilitation specialist, clinical trainee, or mental health practitioner status;


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(ii) employ seven or more treatment team full-time equivalents, excluding the program assistant and the psychiatric care provider;

 

(iii) serve an annual average maximum caseload of 51 to 74 clients;

 

(iv) ensure at least one full-time equivalent position for every nine clients served;

 

(v) schedule ACT team staff for a minimum of ten-hour shift coverage on weekdays and six- to eight-hour shift coverage on weekends and holidays.  In addition to these minimum specifications, staff are regularly scheduled to provide the necessary services on a client-by-client basis in the evenings and on weekends and holidays;

 

(vi) schedule ACT team staff on-call duty to provide crisis services and deliver services when staff are not working;

 

(vii) have the authority to arrange for coverage for crisis assessment and intervention services through a reliable crisis-intervention provider as long as there is a mechanism by which the ACT team communicates routinely with the crisis-intervention provider and the on-call ACT team staff are available to see clients face-to-face when necessary or if requested by the crisis-intervention services provider; and

 

(viii) arrange for and provide psychiatric backup during all hours the psychiatric care provider is not regularly scheduled to work.  If availability of the psychiatric care provider during all hours is not feasible, alternative psychiatric prescriber backup must be arranged and a mechanism of timely communication and coordination established in writing;

 

(3) a large ACT team must:

 

(i) be composed of, at minimum, one full-time team leader, at least 32 hours each week per 100 clients, or equivalent of psychiatry time, three full-time equivalent nursing staff, one full-time co-occurring disorder specialist, one full-time equivalent mental health certified peer specialist, one full-time vocational specialist, one full-time program assistant, and at least two additional full-time equivalent ACT team members, with at least one dedicated full-time staff member with mental health professional status.  Remaining team members may have mental health professional or mental health practitioner status;

 

(ii) employ nine or more treatment team full-time equivalents, excluding the program assistant and psychiatric care provider;

 

(iii) serve an annual average maximum caseload of 75 to 100 clients;

 

(iv) ensure at least one full-time equivalent position for every nine individuals served;

 

(v) schedule staff to work two eight-hour shifts, with a minimum of two staff on the second shift providing services at least 12 hours per day weekdays.  For weekends and holidays, the team must operate and schedule ACT team staff to work one eight-hour shift, with a minimum of two staff each weekend day and every holiday;

 

(vi) schedule ACT team staff on-call duty to provide crisis services and deliver services when staff are not working; and

 

(vii) arrange for and provide psychiatric backup during all hours the psychiatric care provider is not regularly scheduled to work.  If availability of the ACT team psychiatric care provider during all hours is not feasible, alternative psychiatric backup must be arranged and a mechanism of timely communication and coordination established in writing.

 

(b) An ACT team of any size may have a staff-to-client ratio that is lower than the requirements described in paragraph (a) upon approval by the commissioner, but may not exceed a one-to-ten staff-to-client ratio.


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Sec. 11.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 256B.0622, subdivision 7d, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 7d.  Assertive community treatment assessment and individual treatment plan.  (a) An initial assessment shall be completed the day of the client's admission to assertive community treatment by the ACT team leader or the psychiatric care provider, with participation by designated ACT team members and the client.  The initial assessment must include obtaining or completing a standard diagnostic assessment according to section 245I.10, subdivision 6, and completing a 30-day individual treatment plan.  The team leader, psychiatric care provider, or other mental health professional designated by the team leader or psychiatric care provider, must update the client's diagnostic assessment at least annually as required under section 245I.10, subdivision 2, paragraphs (f) and (g).

 

(b) A functional assessment must be completed according to section 245I.10, subdivision 9.  Each part of the functional assessment areas shall be completed by each respective team specialist or an ACT team member with skill and knowledge in the area being assessed.

 

(c) Between 30 and 45 days after the client's admission to assertive community treatment, the entire ACT team must hold a comprehensive case conference, where all team members, including the psychiatric provider, present information discovered from the completed assessments and provide treatment recommendations.  The conference must serve as the basis for the first individual treatment plan, which must be written by the primary team member.

 

(d) The client's psychiatric care provider, primary team member, and individual treatment team members shall assume responsibility for preparing the written narrative of the results from the psychiatric and social functioning history timeline and the comprehensive assessment.

 

(e) The primary team member and individual treatment team members shall be assigned by the team leader in collaboration with the psychiatric care provider by the time of the first treatment planning meeting or 30 days after admission, whichever occurs first.

 

(f) Individual treatment plans must be developed through the following treatment planning process:

 

(1) The individual treatment plan shall be developed in collaboration with the client and the client's preferred natural supports, and guardian, if applicable and appropriate.  The ACT team shall evaluate, together with each client, the client's needs, strengths, and preferences and develop the individual treatment plan collaboratively.  The ACT team shall make every effort to ensure that the client and the client's family and natural supports, with the client's consent, are in attendance at the treatment planning meeting, are involved in ongoing meetings related to treatment, and have the necessary supports to fully participate.  The client's participation in the development of the individual treatment plan shall be documented.

 

(2) The client and the ACT team shall work together to formulate and prioritize the issues, set goals, research approaches and interventions, and establish the plan.  The plan is individually tailored so that the treatment, rehabilitation, and support approaches and interventions achieve optimum symptom reduction, help fulfill the personal needs and aspirations of the client, take into account the cultural beliefs and realities of the individual, and improve all the aspects of psychosocial functioning that are important to the client.  The process supports strengths, rehabilitation, and recovery.

 

(3) Each client's individual treatment plan shall identify service needs, strengths and capacities, and barriers, and set specific and measurable short- and long-term goals for each service need.  The individual treatment plan must clearly specify the approaches and interventions necessary for the client to achieve the individual goals, when the interventions shall happen, and identify which ACT team member shall carry out the approaches and interventions.


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(4) The primary team member and the individual treatment team, together with the client and the client's family and natural supports with the client's consent, are responsible for reviewing and rewriting the treatment goals and individual treatment plan whenever there is a major decision point in the client's course of treatment or at least every six months.

 

(5) The primary team member shall prepare a summary that thoroughly describes in writing the client's and the individual treatment team's evaluation of the client's progress and goal attainment, the effectiveness of the interventions, and the satisfaction with services since the last individual treatment plan.  The client's most recent diagnostic assessment must be included with the treatment plan summary.

 

(6) The individual treatment plan and review must be approved or acknowledged by the client, the primary team member, the team leader, the psychiatric care provider, and all individual treatment team members.  A copy of the approved individual treatment plan must be made available to the client.

 

Sec. 12.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 256B.0757, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Payments.  (a) The commissioner shall make payments to each designated provider for the provision of health home services described in subdivision 3 to each eligible individual under subdivision 2 that selects the health home as a provider determine and implement a single statewide reimbursement rate for behavioral health home services under this section.  The rate must be no less than $408 per member, per month.  The commissioner must adjust the statewide reimbursement rate annually according to the change from the midpoint of the previous rate year to the midpoint of the rate year for which the rate is being determined using the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Medicare Economic Index as forecasted in the fourth quarter of the calendar year before the rate year.

 

(b) The commissioner must review and update the behavioral health home service rate under paragraph (a) at least every four years.  The updated rate must account for the average hours required for behavioral health home team members spent providing services and the Department of Labor prevailing wage for required behavioral health home team members.  The updated rate must ensure that behavioral health home services rates are sufficient to allow providers to meet required certifications, training, and practice transformation standards; staff qualification requirements; and service delivery standards.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective January 1, 2025, or upon federal approval, whichever is later.  The commissioner of human services shall inform the revisor of statutes when federal approval is obtained.

 

Sec. 13.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 256B.76, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Physician and professional services reimbursement.  (a) Effective for services rendered on or after October 1, 1992, the commissioner shall make payments for physician services as follows:

 

(1) payment for level one Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' common procedural coding system codes titled "office and other outpatient services," "preventive medicine new and established patient," "delivery, antepartum, and postpartum care," "critical care," cesarean delivery and pharmacologic management provided to psychiatric patients, and level three codes for enhanced services for prenatal high risk, shall be paid at the lower of (i) submitted charges, or (ii) 25 percent above the rate in effect on June 30, 1992;

 

(2) payments for all other services shall be paid at the lower of (i) submitted charges, or (ii) 15.4 percent above the rate in effect on June 30, 1992; and

 

(3) all physician rates shall be converted from the 50th percentile of 1982 to the 50th percentile of 1989, less the percent in aggregate necessary to equal the above increases except that payment rates for home health agency services shall be the rates in effect on September 30, 1992.


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(b) (a) Effective for services rendered on or after January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2024, payment rates for physician and professional services shall be increased by three percent over the rates in effect on December 31, 1999, except for home health agency and family planning agency services.  The increases in this paragraph shall be implemented January 1, 2000, for managed care.

 

(c) (b) Effective for services rendered on or after July 1, 2009, through December 31, 2024, payment rates for physician and professional services shall be reduced by five percent, except that for the period July 1, 2009, through June 30, 2010, payment rates shall be reduced by 6.5 percent for the medical assistance and general assistance medical care programs, over the rates in effect on June 30, 2009.  This reduction and the reductions in paragraph (d) do not apply to office or other outpatient visits, preventive medicine visits and family planning visits billed by physicians, advanced practice registered nurses, or physician assistants in a family planning agency or in one of the following primary care practices:  general practice, general internal medicine, general pediatrics, general geriatrics, and family medicine.  This reduction and the reductions in paragraph (d) do not apply to federally qualified health centers, rural health centers, and Indian health services.  Effective October 1, 2009, payments made to managed care plans and county-based purchasing plans under sections 256B.69, 256B.692, and 256L.12 shall reflect the payment reduction described in this paragraph.

 

(d) (c) Effective for services rendered on or after July 1, 2010, through December 31, 2024, payment rates for physician and professional services shall be reduced an additional seven percent over the five percent reduction in rates described in paragraph (c).  This additional reduction does not apply to physical therapy services, occupational therapy services, and speech pathology and related services provided on or after July 1, 2010.  This additional reduction does not apply to physician services billed by a psychiatrist or an advanced practice registered nurse with a specialty in mental health.  Effective October 1, 2010, payments made to managed care plans and county-based purchasing plans under sections 256B.69, 256B.692, and 256L.12 shall reflect the payment reduction described in this paragraph.

 

(e) Effective for services rendered on or after September 1, 2011, through June 30, 2013, payment rates for physician and professional services shall be reduced three percent from the rates in effect on August 31, 2011.  This reduction does not apply to physical therapy services, occupational therapy services, and speech pathology and related services.

 

(f) (d) Effective for services rendered on or after September 1, 2014, through December 31, 2024, payment rates for physician and professional services, including physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech pathology, and mental health services shall be increased by five percent from the rates in effect on August 31, 2014.  In calculating this rate increase, the commissioner shall not include in the base rate for August 31, 2014, the rate increase provided under section 256B.76, subdivision 7.  This increase does not apply to federally qualified health centers, rural health centers, and Indian health services.  Payments made to managed care plans and county-based purchasing plans shall not be adjusted to reflect payments under this paragraph.

 

(g) (e) Effective for services rendered on or after July 1, 2015, payment rates for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech pathology and related services provided by a hospital meeting the criteria specified in section 62Q.19, subdivision 1, paragraph (a), clause (4), shall be increased by 90 percent from the rates in effect on June 30, 2015.  Payments made to managed care plans and county-based purchasing plans shall not be adjusted to reflect payments under this paragraph.

 

(h) (f) Any ratables effective before July 1, 2015, do not apply to early intensive developmental and behavioral intervention (EIDBI) benefits described in section 256B.0949.

 

(i) (g) The commissioner may reimburse physicians and other licensed professionals for costs incurred to pay the fee for testing newborns who are medical assistance enrollees for heritable and congenital disorders under section 144.125, subdivision 1, paragraph (c), when the sample is collected outside of an inpatient hospital or freestanding birth center and the cost is not recognized by another payment source.


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Sec. 14.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 256B.76, subdivision 6, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 6.  Medicare relative value units.  Effective for services rendered on or after January 1, 2007, the commissioner shall make payments for physician and professional services based on the Medicare relative value units (RVU's).  This change shall be budget neutral and the cost of implementing RVU's will be incorporated in the established conversion factor (a) Effective for physician and professional services included in the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule and rendered on or after January 1, 2025, the commissioner shall make payments at rates at least equal to 100 percent of the corresponding rates in the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule.  Payment rates set under this paragraph must use Medicare relative value units (RVUs) and conversion factors, at least equal to those in the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule, to implement the resource-based relative value scale.

 

(b) The commissioner shall revise fee-for-service payment methodologies under this section, upon the issuance of a Medicare Physician Fee Schedule final rule by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, to ensure the payment rates under this subdivision are at least equal to the corresponding rates in the final rule.

 

(c) The commissioner must revise and implement payment rates for mental health services based on RVUs and rendered on or after January 1, 2025, such that the payment rates are at least equal to 100 percent of the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule in accordance with paragraph (a), before or at the same time as when the commissioner revises and implements payment rates for other services under paragraph (a).

 

(d) All mental health services and substance use disorder services performed in a primary care or mental health care health professional shortage area, medically underserved area, or medically underserved population, as maintained and updated by the United States Department of Health and Human Services, are eligible for a ten percent bonus payment.  The services are eligible for a bonus based upon the performance of the service in a health professional shortage area if (1) the services were rendered in a health professional shortage area, or (2) the provider maintains an office in a health professional shortage area.

 

(e) Effective for services rendered on or after January 1, 2025, the commissioner shall increase capitation payments made to managed care plans and county-based purchasing plans to reflect the rate increases provided under this subdivision.  Managed care and county-based purchasing plans must use the capitation rate increase provided under this paragraph to increase payment rates to the providers corresponding to the rate increases.  The commissioner must monitor the effect of this rate increase on enrollee access to services under this subdivision.  If for any contract year federal approval is not received for this paragraph, the commissioner must adjust the capitation rates paid to managed care plans and county-based purchasing plans for that contract year to reflect the removal of this provision.  Contracts between managed care plans and county-based purchasing plans and providers to whom this paragraph applies must allow recovery of payments from those providers if capitation rates are adjusted in accordance with this paragraph.  Payment recoveries must not exceed the amount equal to any increase in rates that results from this provision.

 

Sec. 15.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 256B.761, is amended to read:

 

256B.761 REIMBURSEMENT FOR MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES.

 

(a) Effective for services rendered on or after July 1, 2001, payment for medication management provided to psychiatric patients, outpatient mental health services, day treatment services, home-based mental health services, and family community support services shall be paid at the lower of (1) submitted charges, or (2) 75.6 percent of the 50th percentile of 1999 charges.

 

(b) Effective July 1, 2001, the medical assistance rates for outpatient mental health services provided by an entity that operates:  (1) a Medicare-certified comprehensive outpatient rehabilitation facility; and (2) a facility that was certified prior to January 1, 1993, with at least 33 percent of the clients receiving rehabilitation services in the


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most recent calendar year who are medical assistance recipients, will be increased by 38 percent, when those services are provided within the comprehensive outpatient rehabilitation facility and provided to residents of nursing facilities owned by the entity.

 

(c) In addition to rate increases otherwise provided, the commissioner may restructure coverage policy and rates to improve access to adult rehabilitative mental health services under section 256B.0623 and related mental health support services under section 256B.021, subdivision 4, paragraph (f), clause (2).  For state fiscal years 2015 and 2016, the projected state share of increased costs due to this paragraph is transferred from adult mental health grants under sections 245.4661 and 256E.12.  The transfer for fiscal year 2016 is a permanent base adjustment for subsequent fiscal years.  Payments made to managed care plans and county-based purchasing plans under sections 256B.69, 256B.692, and 256L.12 shall reflect the rate changes described in this paragraph.

 

(d) Any ratables effective before July 1, 2015, do not apply to early intensive developmental and behavioral intervention (EIDBI) benefits described in section 256B.0949.

 

(e) Effective for services rendered on or after January 1, 2024, payment rates for behavioral health services included in the rate analysis required by Laws 2021, First Special Session chapter 7, article 17, section 18, except for adult day treatment services under section 256B.0671, subdivision 3; early intensive developmental and behavioral intervention services under section 256B.0949; and substance use disorder services under chapter 254B, must be increased by three percent from the rates in effect on December 31, 2023.  Effective for services rendered on or after January 1, 2025, payment rates for behavioral health services included in the rate analysis required by Laws 2021, First Special Session chapter 7, article 17, section 18, except for adult day treatment services under section 256B.0671, subdivision 3; early intensive developmental behavioral intervention services under section 256B.0949; and substance use disorder services under chapter 254B, must be annually adjusted according to the change from the midpoint of the previous rate year to the midpoint of the rate year for which the rate is being determined using the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Medicare Economic Index as forecasted in the fourth quarter of the calendar year before the rate year.  For payments made in accordance with this paragraph, if and to the extent that the commissioner identifies that the state has received federal financial participation for behavioral health services in excess of the amount allowed under United States Code, title 42, section 447.321, the state shall repay the excess amount to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services with state money and maintain the full payment rate under this paragraph.  This paragraph does not apply to federally qualified health centers, rural health centers, Indian health services, certified community behavioral health clinics, cost-based rates, and rates that are negotiated with the county.  This paragraph expires upon legislative implementation of the new rate methodology resulting from the rate analysis required by Laws 2021, First Special Session chapter 7, article 17, section 18.

 

(f) Effective January 1, 2024, the commissioner shall increase capitation payments made to managed care plans and county-based purchasing plans to reflect the behavioral health service rate increase provided in paragraph (e).  Managed care and county-based purchasing plans must use the capitation rate increase provided under this paragraph to increase payment rates to behavioral health services providers.  The commissioner must monitor the effect of this rate increase on enrollee access to behavioral health services.  If for any contract year federal approval is not received for this paragraph, the commissioner must adjust the capitation rates paid to managed care plans and county-based purchasing plans for that contract year to reflect the removal of this provision.  Contracts between managed care plans and county-based purchasing plans and providers to whom this paragraph applies must allow recovery of payments from those providers if capitation rates are adjusted in accordance with this paragraph.  Payment recoveries must not exceed the amount equal to any increase in rates that results from this provision.

 

(g) Effective for services under this section billed and coded under HCPCS H, S, and T codes and rendered on or after January 1, 2025, the payment rates shall be increased as necessary to align with the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule.


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(h) The commissioner shall revise fee-for-service payment methodologies under paragraph (g), upon the issuance of a Medicare Physician Fee Schedule final rule by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, as necessary to ensure the payments rates under paragraph (g) align with the corresponding payment rates in the final rule.

 

Sec. 16.  DIRECTION TO COMMISSIONER OF HUMAN SERVICES; MEDICAID REENTRY SECTION 1115 DEMONSTRATION OPPORTUNITY WAIVER.

 

(a) The commissioner of human services shall apply to the secretary of health and human services for a Medicaid Reentry Section 1115 Demonstration Opportunity waiver to provide short term medical assistance enrollment assistance and prerelease coverage for care transition services to incarcerated individuals who are soon to be released from incarceration, consistent with the statutory directive in section 5032 of the Substance Use-Disorder Prevention that Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment for Patients and Communities Act (Public Law 115-271) and federal guidance.  The commissioner's application must request coverage for at least the services under Minnesota Statutes, section 256B.0625, subdivision 72, for at least 30 days prior to an eligible incarcerated individual's expected release date.

 

(b) When preparing the application for the Section 1115 Demonstration Opportunity waiver, the commissioner of human services must consult with the commissioner of corrections, sheriffs, lead agencies, and individuals with lived experience of incarceration.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 17.  REVISOR INSTRUCTION.

 

The revisor of statutes, in consultation with the Office of Senate Counsel, Research and Fiscal Analysis; the House Research Department; and the commissioner of human services, shall prepare legislation for the 2025 legislative session to recodify Minnesota Statutes, section 256B.0622, to move provisions related to assertive community treatment and intensive residential treatment services into separate sections of statute.  The revisor shall correct any cross-references made necessary by this recodification.

 

Sec. 18.  REPEALER.

 

Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 256B.0625, subdivision 38, is repealed.

 

ARTICLE 3

MISCELLANEOUS

 

Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 246.18, subdivision 4a, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4a.  Mental health innovation account.  The mental health innovation account is established in the special revenue fund.  Beginning in fiscal year 2018, $1,000,000 of The revenue generated by collection efforts from the Anoka-Metro Regional Treatment Center and community behavioral health hospitals under section 246.54 must annually be deposited into the mental health innovation account.  Money deposited in the mental health innovation account is appropriated to the commissioner of human services for the mental health innovation grant program under section 245.4662.

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 246.54, subdivision 1a, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 1a.  Anoka-Metro Regional Treatment Center.  (a) A county's payment of the cost of care provided at Anoka-Metro Regional Treatment Center shall be according to the following schedule:

 

(1) zero percent for the first 30 days;


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(2) 20 percent for days 31 and over if the stay is determined to be clinically appropriate for the client; and

 

(3) 100 percent for each day during the stay, including the day of admission, when the facility determines that it is clinically appropriate for the client to be discharged.

 

(b) If payments received by the state under sections 246.50 to 246.53 exceed 80 percent of the cost of care for days over 31 for clients who meet the criteria in paragraph (a), clause (2), the county shall be responsible for paying the state only the remaining amount.  The county shall not be entitled to reimbursement from the client, the client's estate, or from the client's relatives, except as provided in section 246.53.

 

(c) Between July 1, 2023, and June 30, 2025, the county is not responsible for the cost of care under paragraph (a), clause (3), for a person who is committed as a person who has a mental illness and is dangerous to the public under section 253B.18 and who is awaiting transfer to another state-operated facility or program.  This paragraph expires June 30, 2025.

 

(d) (c) Notwithstanding any law to the contrary, the client is not responsible for payment of the cost of care under this subdivision.

 

(d) The county is not responsible for the cost of care under paragraph (a), clause (3), for a client who is civilly committed, if the client:

 

(1) is awaiting transfer to a facility operated by the Department of Corrections; or

 

(2) is awaiting transfer to another state-operated facility or program, and the direct care and treatment executive medical director's office has determined that:

 

(i) the client meets criteria for admission to that state-operated facility or program; and

 

(ii) the state-operated facility or program is the only facility or program that can reasonably serve the client.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 246.54, subdivision 1b, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 1b.  Community behavioral health hospitals.  (a) A county's payment of the cost of care provided at state-operated community-based behavioral health hospitals for adults and children shall be according to the following schedule:

 

(1) 100 percent for each day during the stay, including the day of admission, when the facility determines that it is clinically appropriate for the client to be discharged; and

 

(2) the county shall not be entitled to reimbursement from the client, the client's estate, or from the client's relatives, except as provided in section 246.53.

 

(b) Between July 1, 2023, and June 30, 2025, the county is not responsible for the cost of care under paragraph (a), clause (1), for a person committed as a person who has a mental illness and is dangerous to the public under section 253B.18 and who is awaiting transfer to another state-operated facility or program.  This paragraph expires June 30, 2025.


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(c) (b) Notwithstanding any law to the contrary, the client is not responsible for payment of the cost of care under this subdivision.

 

(c) The county is not responsible for the cost of care under paragraph (a), clause (1), for a client who is civilly committed, if the client:

 

(1) is awaiting transfer to a facility operated by the Department of Corrections; or

 

(2) is awaiting transfer to another state-operated facility or program, and the direct care and treatment executive medical director's office has determined that:

 

(i) the client meets criteria for admission to that state-operated facility or program; and

 

(ii) the state-operated facility or program is the only facility or program that can reasonably serve the client.

 

Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 641.15, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Medical aid.  Except as provided in section 466.101, the county board shall pay the costs of medical services provided to prisoners pursuant to this section.  The amount paid by the county board for a medical service shall not exceed the maximum allowed medical assistance payment rate for the service, as determined by the commissioner of human services.  In the absence of a health or medical insurance or health plan that has a contractual obligation with the provider or the prisoner, medical providers shall charge no higher than the rate negotiated between the county and the provider.  In the absence of an agreement between the county and the provider, the provider may not charge an amount that exceeds the maximum allowed medical assistance payment rate for the service, as determined by the commissioner of human services.  The county is entitled to reimbursement from the prisoner for payment of medical bills to the extent that the prisoner to whom the medical aid was provided has the ability to pay the bills.  The prisoner shall, at a minimum, incur co-payment obligations for health care services provided by a county correctional facility.  The county board shall determine the co-payment amount.  A prisoner shall not have a co-payment obligation for receiving a medication for mental health treatment in a county correctional facility.  The county board may seek reimbursement for mental health medication co-payment costs from the commissioner of human services.  Notwithstanding any law to the contrary, the co-payment shall be deducted from any of the prisoner's funds held by the county, to the extent possible.  If there is a disagreement between the county and a prisoner concerning the prisoner's ability to pay, the court with jurisdiction over the defendant shall determine the extent, if any, of the prisoner's ability to pay for the medical services.  If a prisoner is covered by health or medical insurance or other health plan when medical services are provided, the medical provider shall bill that health or medical insurance or other plan.  If the county providing the medical services for a prisoner that has coverage under health or medical insurance or other plan, that county has a right of subrogation to be reimbursed by the insurance carrier for all sums spent by it for medical services to the prisoner that are covered by the policy of insurance or health plan, in accordance with the benefits, limitations, exclusions, provider restrictions, and other provisions of the policy or health plan.  The county may maintain an action to enforce this subrogation right.  The county does not have a right of subrogation against the medical assistance program.  The county shall not charge prisoners for telephone calls to MNsure navigators, the Minnesota Warmline, a mental health provider, or calls for the purpose of providing case management or mental health services as defined in section 245.462 to prisoners.

 

Sec. 5.  JOINT INCIDENT COLLABORATION; DIRECTION TO COMMISSIONER OF HUMAN SERVICES.

 

The commissioner of human services and the Department of Direct Care and Treatment executive board, once operational, shall coordinate to implement a joint incident collaboration model with counties and community mental health treatment providers to actively arrange discharges of direct care and treatment patients to appropriate community treatment settings when the patients are medically stable for discharge.


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ARTICLE 4

APPROPRIATIONS

 

Section 1.  CORRECTIONAL FACILITY MENTAL HEALTH COSTS AND SERVICES.

 

$....... in fiscal year 2025 is appropriated from the general fund to the commissioner of human services for services and costs for prisoners receiving mental health medications in county correctional facilities.  The commissioner must use these funds to:

 

(1) pay for injectable medications or neuroleptic medications used for mental health treatment of prisoners in county correctional facilities and related billable provider costs; and

 

(2) reimburse county boards for co-payment costs incurred for mental health medications provided in county correctional facilities, pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 641.15, subdivision 2.

 

Sec. 2.  DIRECT CARE AND TREATMENT; COUNTY CORRECTIONAL FACILITY MENTAL HEALTH MEDICATIONS.

 

$....... in fiscal year 2025 is appropriated from the general fund to the commissioner of human services to create a staff position within direct care and treatment to provide education, support, and technical assistance to counties and county correctional facilities on the provision of medications for mental health treatment and assist with finding providers to deliver the medications.

 

Sec. 3.  FORENSIC EXAMINER SERVICES.

 

$9,230,000 in fiscal year 2025 is appropriated from the general fund to the supreme court for the psychological and psychiatric forensic examiner services program to deliver statutorily mandated psychological examinations for civil commitment, criminal competency, and criminal responsibility evaluations.  This appropriation must be used to increase forensic examiner pay rates from $125 to $225 per hour.

 

Sec. 4.  DIRECT CARE AND TREATMENT CAPACITY AND UTILIZATION.

 

$....... in fiscal year 2025 is appropriated from the general fund to the commissioner of human services to increase capacity and access to direct care and treatment services for all levels of care.  The commissioner must prioritize expanding capacity within the Forensic Mental Health Program by ten to 20 percent, and Anoka Metro Regional Treatment Center and community behavioral health hospitals by 20 percent, through renovation, construction, reallocation of beds and staff, addition of beds and staff, or a combination of these activities.  The commissioner must also use money appropriated under this section to examine the utilization of beds at the Forensic Mental Health Program to identify opportunities for the most effective utilization of secured programming and to develop and fund direct care and treatment transitional support resources.

 

Sec. 5.  HOSPITAL PAYMENT RATE INCREASES.

 

$8,785,000 in fiscal year 2025 is appropriated from the general fund to the commissioner of human services for the hospital payment rate increases under Minnesota Statutes, section 256.969, subdivision 2b, paragraphs (l) and (m).  The aggregate amount of the increased payments under Minnesota Statutes, section 256.969, subdivision 2b, paragraphs (l) and (m), must at least equal the amount of this appropriation.


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Sec. 6.  ENGAGEMENT SERVICES PILOT GRANTS.

 

$2,000,000 in fiscal year 2025 is appropriated from the general fund to the commissioner of human services for engagement services pilot grants under Minnesota Statutes, section 253B.042.  This funding is added to the base.

 

Sec. 7.  EARLY EPISODE OF BIPOLAR GRANT PROGRAM.

 

$....... in fiscal year 2025 is appropriated from the general fund to the commissioner of human services for the early episode of bipolar grant program under Minnesota Statutes, section 245.4908.  This funding is added to the base.

 

Sec. 8.  FIRST EPISODE OF PSYCHOSIS GRANT PROGRAM.

 

$2,000,000 in fiscal year 2025 is appropriated from the general fund to the commissioner of human services for the first episode of psychosis grant program under Minnesota Statutes, section 245.4905.  This funding is added to the base.  The commissioner may distribute this funding to fully fund current grantee programs, increase a current grantee program's capacity, and to expand grants for programs to outside the seven-county metropolitan area.  The commissioner must continue to fund current grantee programs to ensure stability and continuity of care, if the current grantee programs have met requirements for usage of grant funds previously received."

 

Correct the title numbers accordingly

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Stephenson from the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4400, A bill for an act relating to consumer protection; creating the Prohibiting Social Media Manipulation Act; regulating social media platforms; providing a private right of action and attorney general enforcement; proposing coding for new law as Minnesota Statutes, chapter 325O.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Newton from the Committee on Veterans and Military Affairs Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4412, A bill for an act relating to veterans; modifying veterans home provisions; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 198.006.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.


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Moller from the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4414, A bill for an act relating to public safety; changing name of Ensuring Police Excellence and Improving Community Relations Advisory Council to Public Safety Advisory Council; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 626.8435, subdivision 1; 626.8457, subdivision 3.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be placed on the General Register with the further recommendation that the bill be placed on the Consent Calendar.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Nelson, M., from the Committee on Labor and Industry Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4444, A bill for an act relating to employees; prohibiting misclassification of employees; imposing penalties; classifying data; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 177.27, subdivision 3; 181.171, subdivision 1; 181.722; 181.723; 270B.14, subdivision 17, by adding a subdivision; 326B.081, subdivisions 3, 6, 8; 326B.082, subdivisions 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11, 13, by adding a subdivision; 326B.701; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 177.27, subdivisions 1, 2, 4, 7; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 181.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 6, line 23, after "including" insert "minimum wage;"

 

Page 13, line 25, after "including" insert "minimum wage;"

 

Page 14, line 30, after "section" insert "and section 181.725"

 

Page 15, line 7, delete "its" and insert "the attorney general's"

 

Page 16, after line 5, insert:

 

"Subd. 2a.  Additional meetings.  (a) In addition to regular quarterly meetings under subdivision 2, the commissioner of labor and industry, in consultation with members of the partnership, may convene and lead additional meetings for the purpose of discussing and making recommendations under subdivision 4a.

 

(b) This subdivision expires July 31, 2025, unless a different expiration date is specified in law."

 

Page 16, after line 23, insert:

 

"Subd. 4a.  First presentation.  (a) By March 1, 2025, the Intergovernmental Misclassification Enforcement and Education Partnership shall make its first presentation to members of the house of representatives and senate committees with jurisdiction over labor.  The first presentation may be made in a form and manner determined by the partnership.  In addition to providing information about how the partnership carried out its duties in its first year, the presentation shall include the following information and recommendations, including any budget requests to carry out the recommendations:

 

(1) consider any staffing recommendations for the partnership and each partnership entity to carry out the duties and responsibilities under this section;


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(2) provide a summary of the industries, areas, and employers with high numbers of misclassification violations and recommendations for proactive review and enforcement efforts;

 

(3) propose a system for making cross referrals between partnership entities;

 

(4) identify cross-training needs and a proposed cross-training plan; and

 

(5) propose a metric or plan for monitoring and assessing:

 

(i) the number and severity of employee misclassification violations; and

 

(ii) the adequacy and effectiveness of the partnership's duties related to employee misclassification, including but not limited to the partnership's efforts on education, outreach, detection, investigation, deterrence, and enforcement of employee misclassification.

 

(b) This subdivision expires July 31, 2025, unless a different expiration date is specified in law."

 

Page 17, line 12, after "detection" insert a comma

 

Page 17, after line 23, insert:

 

"EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment."

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on State and Local Government Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Liebling from the Committee on Health Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4484, A bill for an act relating to health; repealing the sunset for the long-term safety net insulin program; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 151.74, subdivision 16.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 1, after line 4, insert:

 

"Section 1.  Laws 2020, chapter 73, section 8, is amended to read:

 

Sec. 8.  APPROPRIATIONS.

 

(a) $297,000 is appropriated in fiscal year 2020 from the health care access fund to the Board of Directors of MNsure to train navigators to assist individuals and provide compensation as required for the insulin safety net program under Minnesota Statutes, section 151.74, subdivision 7.  Of this appropriation, $108,000 is for implementing the training requirements for navigators and $189,000 is for application assistance bonus payments. This is a onetime appropriation and is available until December 31, 2024 June 30, 2027.


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(b) $250,000 is appropriated in fiscal year 2020 from the health care access fund to the Board of Directors of MNsure for a public awareness campaign for the insulin safety net program established under Minnesota Statutes, section 151.74.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until December 31, 2024. 

 

(c) $76,000 is appropriated in fiscal year 2021 from the health care access fund to the Board of Pharmacy to implement Minnesota Statutes, section 151.74.  The base for this appropriation is $76,000 in fiscal year 2022; $76,000 in fiscal year 2023; $76,000 in fiscal year 2024; $38,000 in fiscal year 2025; and $0 in fiscal year 2026.

 

(d) $136,000 in fiscal year 2021 is appropriated from the health care access fund to the commissioner of health to implement the survey to assess program satisfaction in Minnesota Statutes, section 151.74, subdivision 12.  The base for this appropriation is $80,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $0 in fiscal year 2023.  This is a onetime appropriation."

 

Renumber the sections in sequence

 

Amend the title as follows:

 

Page 1, line 2, after the first semicolon insert "modifying and extending the appropriation for the long-term safety net insulin program;"

 

Correct the title numbers accordingly

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Ways and Means.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Youakim from the Committee on Education Finance to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4518, A bill for an act relating to education finance; making forecast adjustments; appropriating money; amending Laws 2023, chapter 18, section 4, subdivisions 2, as amended, 3, as amended; Laws 2023, chapter 54, section 20, subdivisions 7, 9, 17; Laws 2023, chapter 55, article 1, section 36, subdivisions 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9; article 2, section 64, subdivisions 2, 6, 21, 23; article 4, section 21, subdivisions 2, 5; article 5, section 64, subdivisions 3, 14; article 7, section 18, subdivisions 2, 3, 4, 6, 7; article 8, section 19, subdivisions 3, 6; article 9, section 18, subdivisions 4, 8; article 11, section 11, subdivisions 2, 3, 5, 10.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Ways and Means.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Pinto from the Committee on Children and Families Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 4561, A bill for an act relating to education finance; making forecast adjustments; appropriating money; amending Laws 2023, chapter 18, section 4, subdivisions 2, as amended, 3, as amended; Laws 2023, chapter 54, section 20, subdivisions 7, 9, 17; Laws 2023, chapter 55, article 1, section 36, subdivisions 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9; article 2, section 64, subdivisions 2, 6, 21, 23; article 4, section 21, subdivisions 2, 5; article 5, section 64, subdivisions 3, 14; article 7, section 18, subdivisions 2, 3, 4, 6, 7; article 8, section 19, subdivisions 3, 6; article 9, section 18, subdivisions 4, 8; article 11, section 11, subdivisions 2, 3, 5, 10.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Ways and Means.

 

      The report was adopted.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11672

SECOND READING OF HOUSE BILLS

 

 

      H. F. Nos. 3456, 3470, 3473, 3490, 3539, 3599, 3791, 3925, 4015, 4021, 4040, 4041 and 4414 were read for the second time.

 

 

INTRODUCTION AND FIRST READING OF HOUSE BILLS

 

 

      The following House Files were introduced:

 

 

      Dotseth, Wiens, Bliss, Gillman, Zeleznikar, Knudsen, Nadeau, Hudella, Lillie and Newton introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4589, A bill for an act relating to transportation; establishing a special license plate for veterans who received the Army of Occupation Medal; making technical changes; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 168.123.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.

 

 

Engen, Novotny, Hudson, Myers, Bakeberg, Niska, Witte, Murphy, Nadeau, Zeleznikar and Knudsen introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4590, A bill for an act relating to retirement; PERA police and fire plan; increasing the survivor benefit for members who die in the line of duty; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 353.657, subdivisions 2, 3a.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State and Local Government Finance and Policy.

 

 

Tabke and Edelson introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4591, A bill for an act relating to private detectives; specifying that a protective agent license is required for private companies to transport prisoners; requiring license revocation for certain acts committed by a licensee or employee of a licensee; requiring a minimum administrative penalty for certain violations; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 326.338, subdivision 4; 326.3388; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 326.3387, subdivision 1.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy.

 

 

Klevorn and Pursell introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4592, A bill for an act relating to agriculture; transferring money to the University of Minnesota for the Forever Green Initiative.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Agriculture Finance and Policy.


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Klevorn, Bierman, Acomb, Hortman, Kotyza-Witthuhn, Stephenson, Huot, Virnig, Cha, Wolgamott, Edelson, Finke, Pryor, Jordan, Tabke, Hemmingsen-Jaeger, Curran, Pérez-Vega, Bahner and Elkins introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4593, A bill for an act relating to redistricting; establishing an advisory citizens' redistricting commission; establishing redistricting principles and redistricting requirements; proposing a constitutional amendment to establish an independent citizens' redistricting commission; appropriating money; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 2A; 204B; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 2.91, subdivision 1.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Elections Finance and Policy.

 

 

Schomacker and Kresha introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4594, A bill for an act relating to education finance; expanding the allowable uses of student support personnel aid; amending Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 124D.901, subdivision 4.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Education Finance.

 

 

Zeleznikar, Robbins, Perryman, Davis, Kiel, Skraba, Knudsen and Dotseth introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4595, A bill for an act relating to state government; adopting a new design for the state flag and Great Seal; amending Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 1.135, subdivision 3a; 1.141, subdivision 1.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State and Local Government Finance and Policy.

 

 

Knudsen; Grossell; Joy; Bliss; Hudson; Zeleznikar; Perryman; Anderson, P. E.; Engen; Altendorf; Burkel; Harder; Wiener; Jacob and Fogelman introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4596, A bill for an act relating to local government; establishing the CIVIL Act; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 373.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State and Local Government Finance and Policy.

 

 

Lislegard introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4597, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for renovation of the community center in the city of Gilbert; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Long; Greenman; Freiberg; Pursell; Agbaje; Gomez; Norris; Smith; Liebling; Curran; Hassan; Finke; Hanson, J.; Hansen, R.; Becker-Finn; Frederick; Bierman; Virnig; Howard; Frazier; Vang; Xiong; Coulter; Sencer-Mura; Jordan; Pérez-Vega; Hussein; Tabke; Pryor; Noor; Edelson; Stephenson; Lee, F.; Kraft and Kozlowski introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4598, A bill for an act relating to the legislature; proposing an amendment to the Minnesota Constitution, article IV, sections 3, 5, and 12; by adding an article XV; establishing an Independent Redistricting Commission; establishing a Redistricting Commission Applicant Review Panel; establishing principles to be used in


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11674

adopting legislative and congressional districts; prohibiting members of the legislature from being employed or engaged for compensation as a lobbyist for a period of one year following the end of their legislative service; amending requirements related to the convening and conduct of regular legislative sessions; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 2.031, by adding a subdivision; 2.731; 10A.01, subdivision 35; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 2; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 2.91.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Elections Finance and Policy.

 

 

Klevorn and Moller introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4599, A bill for an act relating to the State Capitol complex; modifying requirements related to security services within the State Capitol complex; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 10.01; 299E.01, subdivisions 2, 4.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State and Local Government Finance and Policy.

 

 

Huot introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4600, A bill for an act relating to health; modifying ambulance staffing requirements and emergency medical responder registration; extending authority to reinstate ambulance service personnel certifications; modifying requirements for approval and reapproval of education programs; modifying an appropriation; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 144E.001, subdivision 3a; 144E.101, by adding a subdivision; 144E.27, subdivisions 3, 5, 6; 144E.28, subdivisions 3, 8; 144E.285, subdivisions 1, 2, 4, by adding subdivisions; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 144E.101, subdivisions 6, 7; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 144E.27, subdivisions 1, 1a.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

 

Zeleznikar, Knudsen, Engen, Mueller, Skraba, Scott, Altendorf, Grossell, Joy, Murphy, Wiener, Bakeberg, Davis, Franson, Perryman, Bennett, Dotseth, Igo, Mekeland, Schultz, Nadeau and Jacob introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4601, A bill for an act relating to health; establishing a program to provide grants to women's pregnancy centers and maternity homes; reducing an appropriation; appropriating money; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 145.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

 

Engen, Dotseth, Zeleznikar, Novotny, Hudson, Bakeberg, Niska, Wiener, Murphy and Scott introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4602, A bill for an act relating to public safety; amending the definition of prior qualified human trafficking-related offense to include violations of certain state laws committed in the person's lifetime and violations of similar laws in other states; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 609.321, subdivision 14.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy.


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Engen, Zeleznikar, Novotny, Hudson, Bakeberg, Murphy, Wiener and Scott introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4603, A bill for an act relating to public safety; requiring yearly reporting of trafficking data; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 299A.785, subdivision 2.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy.

 

 

Smith introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4604, A bill for an act relating to taxation; corporate franchise; imposing an additional tax on certain corporations with high principal executive officer to median worker pay ratios; disqualifying certain companies from receiving state subsidies and grants; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 290.06, subdivision 1; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 16B.981, by adding a subdivision.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Taxes.

 

 

Bierman introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4605, A bill for an act relating to health; modifying requirements for the medication repository program; amending Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 151.555, subdivisions 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

 

Noor introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4606, A bill for an act relating to human services; allowing direct support professionals to access MinnesotaCare; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 256L.04, by adding a subdivision; 256L.15, subdivision 2.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

 

Hassan, Gomez, Vang and Xiong introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4607, A bill for an act relating to judiciary; extending the civil statute of limitations for certain actions by peace officers; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 541.073, subdivision 2; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 573.02, subdivision 1.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law.

 

 

Tabke; Koegel; Brand; Noor; Lislegard; Petersburg; Pfarr; Wolgamott; Anderson, P. H.; Dotseth; Kozlowski; Lillie and Elkins introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4608, A bill for an act relating to transportation; providing for commercial transportation; establishing a commercial driver training assistance program; establishing a truck parking improvement program; appropriating money; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 171.01, by adding a subdivision; 171.13, subdivision 8; 171.3213; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 171; 174; repealing Minnesota Rules, part 7410.6180.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.


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Lillie; Lee, K., and Fischer introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4609, A bill for an act relating to motor vehicles; drivers' licenses; establishing a full-service office by authorizing the appointment of a driver's license agent at the Hmong Village Shopping Center in the city of St. Paul; amending Laws 2023, chapter 68, article 4, section 108.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.

 

 

Moller introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4610, A bill for an act relating to consumer protection; prohibiting the possession, manufacture, or sale of cellular telephone cases resembling a firearm; providing a civil penalty; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 325F.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.

 

 

Pryor introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4611, A bill for an act relating to libraries; directing the commissioner of education to amend rules relating to regional libraries.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Education Policy.

 

 

Carroll, Virnig, Lillie, Reyer, Freiberg and Myers introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4612, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for metropolitan cities inflow and infiltration grants; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Pursell, Howard, Jordan and Berg introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4613, A bill for an act relating to housing; requiring landlords to test for radon and provide disclosures; providing penalties and remedies; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 504B.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Housing Finance and Policy.

 

 

Norris, Cha, Howard, Petersburg and Agbaje introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4614, A bill for an act relating to housing; appropriating money for Land Bank Twin Cities.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Housing Finance and Policy.


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Clardy, Hill, Pryor and Virnig introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4615, A bill for an act relating to education finance; authorizing a grant to the Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement to conduct a survey of Minnesota principals; appropriating money.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Education Finance.

 

 

Noor introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4616, A bill for an act relating to human services; requiring the commissioner of human services to submit an application for a 1115 demonstration waiver to provide substance use disorder treatment services to incarcerated individuals.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Human Services Finance.

 

 

Quam; Davids; Anderson, P. H., and Koznick introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4617, A bill for an act relating to taxation; property; dedicating a portion of local government aid to cities for pre-1940 housing improvements; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 477A.013, by adding a subdivision.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Taxes.

 

 

Her introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4618, A bill for an act relating to housing; modifying an appropriation for the housing infrastructure program; providing for assistance to preserve naturally-occuring affordable housing; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 469.012, by adding a subdivision; Laws 2023, chapter 37, article 1, section 2, subdivision 17.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Housing Finance and Policy.

 

 

Nadeau, Knudsen, Skraba, Myers, Novotny, Dotseth, Davis, Engen and Robbins introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4619, A bill for an act relating to taxation; individual income; establishing a budget surplus credit; appropriating money; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 290.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Taxes.

 

 

Cha, Tabke, Lillie, Huot, Howard, Sencer-Mura, Frazier, Newton, Hussein, Virnig and Pérez-Vega introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4620, A bill for an act relating to legacy; appropriating money from the arts and cultural heritage fund to develop and produce film series that educate and engage residents, communities, and others on housing challenges and solutions towards helping Minnesotans age in place, thrive, prevent homelessness, increase opportunities, and strengthen communities.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Legacy Finance.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11678

Jordan introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4621, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for construction of a new National Loon Center in the city of Crosslake; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Jordan introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4622, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; amending an earlier appropriation for capital improvements for the National Loon Center; amending Laws 2023, chapter 72, article 2, section 3, subdivision 4.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Mekeland introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4623, A bill for an act relating to transportation; modifying supplemental warning system requirements on school buses; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 169.4503, subdivision 31.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.

 

 

Hansen, R.; Lee, F.; Hollins; Carroll; Fischer; Hornstein and Heintzeman introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4624, A bill for an act relating to environment; requiring a report on state agency salt purchases and establishing reduction goal; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 116.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy.

 

 

Hansen, R.; Jordan; Lee, F.; Carroll; Fischer and Vang introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4625, A bill for an act relating to environment; requiring a report on state agency nitrogen fertilizer purchases and establishing reduction goal; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 116.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Agriculture Finance and Policy.

 

 

Tabke and Garofalo introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4626, A bill for an act relating to public safety; modifying federal pipeline inspection rules for individuals performing construction or maintenance work; repealing prevailing wage exemption for broadband workers; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 299J.02, by adding a subdivision; 299J.11; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116J.398.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11679

Sencer-Mura, Gomez, Hollins and Feist introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4627, A bill for an act relating to transportation; establishing requirements governing transportation cumulative impacts analysis; amending Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 116.065, by adding a subdivision; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 161.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.

 

 

Skraba and Zeleznikar introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4628, A bill for an act relating to public health; exempting certain hot tubs from public pool regulations; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 144.1222, subdivision 2d.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

 

West and Hanson, J., introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4629, A bill for an act relating to hemp products; establishing a petition process to designate cannabinoids as nonintoxicating or approved for use in lower-potency hemp edibles; authorizing lower-potency hemp edibles to contain certain artificially derived cannabinoids created in making delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol; allowing testing of certain hemp products to be performed by labs meeting accreditation standards regardless of licensing status; designating cannabinol and cannabichromene as nonintoxicating cannabinoids; providing for lower‑potency hemp vapes; making conforming changes; amending Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 342.01, subdivision 50, by adding a subdivision; 342.06; 342.46, subdivision 8; 342.61, subdivision 1; 342.63, subdivision 5; 342.66, subdivisions 3, 6; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 342.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.

 

 

Smith, Hemmingsen-Jaeger, Pursell and Hansen, R., introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4630, A bill for an act relating to pollution control; modifying manure management plan requirements for feedlots; establishing minimum setbacks and inspection frequencies; specifying penalties for manure management plan violations; authorizing rulemaking; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116.07, by adding subdivisions.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy.

 

 

Lislegard introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4631, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for local street improvements in the city of Eveleth; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11680

Skraba and Lislegard introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4632, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for replacement of the Kawishiwi Bridge in Lake County; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Lislegard introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4633, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for a public safety facility in Biwabik; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Edelson introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4634, A bill for an act relating to tobacco retailers; requiring tobacco retailers to offer for sale at least one type of nicotine replacement therapy product; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 461.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.

 

 

Huot introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4635, A bill for an act relating to public safety; clarifying the criminal penalty for use and possession of cannabis by persons under 21 years of age; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 260B.007, subdivisions 16, 18; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 152.0263, by adding subdivisions.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy.

 

 

Wiener introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4636, A bill for an act relating to natural resources; requiring a study and report of the impact of eagles on loons.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy.

 

 

Wiener introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4637, A bill for an act relating to taxation; individual income; providing a credit for certain instructional expenses; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 290.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Taxes.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11681

Wiener introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4638, A bill for an act relating to game and fish; allowing accumulation of bear hunter preference points for youth; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 97B.405.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy.

 

 

Wiener introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4639, A bill for an act relating to game and fish; authorizing baiting of deer; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 97B.328.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy.

 

 

Wiener introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4640, A bill for an act relating to game and fish; authorizing taking feral swine causing damage; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 97A.56, subdivision 2; 97B.655, subdivision 1.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy.

 

 

Long and Moller introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4641, A bill for an act relating to public safety; excluding reckless driving resulting in great bodily harm or death from the list of offenses eligible for automatic expungement; reducing the waiting period before a person can petition for expungement from five years to four in certain cases involving a stay of imposition; clarifying that certain offering forged check offenses are eligible for expungement; amending Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 609A.015, subdivision 3; 609A.02, subdivision 3.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy.

 

 

Heintzeman introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4642, A bill for an act relating to game and fish; modifying walleye stamp issuing fees; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 97A.485, subdivision 6.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11682

Freiberg introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4643, A bill for an act relating to local government; clarifying that a service cooperative may participate in local, state, and national civic, educational, and governmental organizations; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 471.96, subdivision 1.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State and Local Government Finance and Policy.

 

 

Huot introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4644, A bill for an act relating to transportation; establishing a "Share the Road" special license plate; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 168.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.

 

 

Kozlowski, Howard, Pérez-Vega and Agbaje introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4645, A bill for an act relating to homelessness; appropriating money for the Minnesota homeless study.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Housing Finance and Policy.

 

 

Sencer-Mura, Gomez, Hollins and Feist introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4646, A bill for an act relating to transportation; requiring alternative design analysis of major highway projects; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 161.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.

 

 

Feist introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4647, A bill for an act relating to data practices; modifying certain data practices provisions to modernize and update data storage practices; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 13.05, subdivision 5; 13.055, subdivision 2; 13.08, subdivision 1; 13.40, subdivision 2; 15.17, subdivisions 1, 2; 138.17, subdivision 1.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law.

 

 

Feist introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4648, A bill for an act relating to data practices; classifying certain information as private data on individuals; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 13.04, by adding a subdivision; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 13.356.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11683

Sencer-Mura introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4649, A bill for an act relating to public safety; modifying child passenger restraint provisions; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 169.685, by adding a subdivision; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 169.685, subdivision 5.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.

 

 

Gillman and Harder introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4650, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for campus improvements at Ridgewater College; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Sencer-Mura introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4651, A bill for an act relating to public safety; establishing that exposure of a human breast alone is not indecent exposure; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 617.23, by adding a subdivision.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy.

 

 

Sencer-Mura introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4652, A bill for an act relating to public safety; modifying crash reporting requirements; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 169.09, subdivisions 5, 14a, 19; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 169.09, subdivision 8.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.

 

 

Pryor introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4653, A bill for an act relating to health professions; requiring licensure of naturopathic doctors; modifying professional conduct; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 147.012; 147E.01, subdivisions 2, 7; 147E.05; 147E.06; 147E.10; 147E.15; 147E.20; 147E.25, subdivisions 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8; 147E.30; 147E.35; 147E.40, subdivisions 1, 2, 3.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

 

Vang introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4654, A bill for an act relating to education; banning bird hatching in schools; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 123B.02, by adding a subdivision; 124E.03, by adding a subdivision.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Education Policy.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11684

Vang introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4655, A bill for an act relating to education; banning bird hatching in schools; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 123B.02, by adding a subdivision; 124E.03, by adding a subdivision.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Agriculture Finance and Policy.

 

 

Pursell introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4656, A bill for an act relating to retirement; revising requirements for supplemental retirement plans; allowing employer matching contributions on account of an employee's qualified student loan payments under Secure 2.0; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 356.24, subdivision 3; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 356.24, subdivision 1.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State and Local Government Finance and Policy.

 

 

Curran, Finke, Kozlowski, Stephenson, Hollins, Jordan and Reyer introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4657, A bill for an act relating to public safety; limiting criminal defenses and authorization for the use of force relating to a victim's sexual orientation or identity; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 609.06, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 609.075; 609.20.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy.

 

 

Koegel introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4658, A bill for an act relating to taxation; property; authorizing levy authority for the Anoka County soil and water conservation district.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Taxes.

 

 

Berg; Nelson, M.; Hansen, R., and Lee, F., introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4659, A bill for an act relating to labor; requiring safety standards for broadband industry installers; implementing the Broadband Equity, Access, and Deployment Program; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 116J.395, subdivision 6; 216B.17, by adding a subdivision; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 116J; 181.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Agriculture Finance and Policy.

 

 

Mekeland introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4660, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for an interchange project in the city of Becker; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11685

Wolgamott introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4661, A bill for an act relating to labor and industry; making technical and policy changes to certain workers' compensation hearing provisions; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 176.011, subdivisions 1a, 2; 176.104, subdivision 1; 176.106, subdivision 4; 176.129, subdivision 10; 176.1292, subdivisions 2, 9; 176.155, subdivision 2; 176.231, subdivision 9a; 176.238, subdivisions 3, 4, 5, 6; 176.239, subdivisions 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10; 176.253, subdivision 2; 176.2611, subdivision 7; 176.271, subdivision 1; 176.275, subdivision 1; 176.285, subdivisions 2, 2a, 2b; 176.305, subdivision 1; 176.321, subdivision 3; 176.322; 176.341, subdivision 6; 176.361, subdivisions 1, 4; 176.421, subdivision 7; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 176.081, subdivision 1; 176.101, subdivision 2a; 176.155, subdivision 1; 176.239, subdivisions 6, 7.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Labor and Industry Finance and Policy.

 

 

Wolgamott introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4662, A bill for an act relating to higher education; establishing academic freedom protections for Minnesota State Colleges and Universities faculty; creating an artificial intelligence working group; requiring a report; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 136F.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Higher Education Finance and Policy.

 

 

Wolgamott introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4663, A bill for an act relating to economic development; health care; appropriating money for the CentraCare Health System  University of Minnesota Medical School Campus.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Workforce Development Finance and Policy.

 

 

Wolgamott introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4664, A bill for an act relating to taxation; sales and use; providing a refundable exemption for construction projects in a redevelopment district in the city of St. Cloud.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Taxes.

 

 

Wolgamott introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4665, A bill for an act relating to veterans; allowing county boards to annually appropriate money for Veterans Day exercises; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 375.35.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Veterans and Military Affairs Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11686

Wolgamott introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4666, A bill for an act relating to retirement; public employees police and fire retirement plan; increasing the postretirement adjustment; decreasing the waiting period for a postretirement adjustment; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 356.415, subdivision 1c.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State and Local Government Finance and Policy.

 

 

Hanson, J., introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4667, A bill for an act relating to higher education; establishing loan forgiveness and grants for home care worker education; requiring reports; transferring money; appropriating money; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 136A.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Higher Education Finance and Policy.

 

 

Hanson, J., introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4668, A bill for an act relating to education; modifying district discipline complaint procedure; requiring the commissioner of education to review appeals of district complaint procedure; amending Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 121A.61, subdivision 4; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 121A.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Education Policy.

 

 

Pérez-Vega introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4669, A bill for an act relating to arts and cultural heritage; appropriating money to (Neo)Muralismos de Mexico.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Legacy Finance.

 

 

Freiberg introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4670, A bill for an act relating to real estate; limiting the exercise of a due-on-sale clause; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 58.13, by adding a subdivision; 513.33, by adding a subdivision.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.

 

 

Fischer introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4671, A bill for an act relating to mental health; modifying respite care grants; creating a youth care professional training program; modifying adult and children's mobile transition units; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 245.4889, subdivision 1; Laws 2021, First Special Session chapter 7, article 17, section 12, as amended; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 245.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Human Services Policy.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11687

Frazier introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4672, A bill for an act relating to court records; requiring prosecuting authorities to seek protective order for certain evidence clearly offensive to common sensibilities; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 634.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy.

 

 

Frazier introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4673, A bill for an act relating to forfeiture; providing for a criminal forfeiture process; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 145.4716, subdivision 2; 289A.14; 299A.681, subdivision 11; 609.66, subdivision 1d; 609.762, subdivision 2; 611.32, subdivision 2; 629.715, subdivision 2; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 609.5316, subdivision 1; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 609; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 609.531, subdivisions 1a, 4, 5, 5a, 6a, 7, 8, 9; 609.5311, subdivisions 2, 3, 4; 609.5312; 609.5313; 609.5314, subdivisions 1a, 2; 609.5315, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5a, 5b, 5c, 7; 609.5318; 609.5319; 609.762, subdivisions 3, 4, 5, 6; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 609.531, subdivision 1; 609.5311, subdivision 1; 609.5314, subdivisions 1, 3.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy.

 

 

Berg and Hanson, J., introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4674, A bill for an act relating to taxation; sales and use; providing a refundable exemption for certain construction materials used in the city of Burnsville.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Taxes.

 

 

Noor introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4675, A bill for an act relating to human services; directing the commissioner of human services to expand reimbursement for overtime, overnight asleep services, and consecutive shifts for personal care assistants and community-first services and supports workers.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Human Services Policy.

 

 

Noor introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4676, A bill for an act relating to human services; prohibiting disqualification of individuals subject to human services background studies with expunged criminal records; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 245C.14, subdivisions 1, 2; 245C.15, by adding a subdivision; 245C.16, subdivision 1; 245C.24, by adding a subdivision.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Human Services Finance.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11688

Schomacker introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4677, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; modifying a previous appropriation for capital improvements to the Lewis and Clark Regional Water System; amending Laws 2023, chapter 71, article 1, section 15, subdivision 2.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Kresha introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4678, A bill for an act relating to public safety; increasing certain criminal penalties for crimes committed because of the victim's political affiliation or beliefs; amending Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 609.2231, subdivision 4; 609.2233; 609.595, subdivisions 1a, 2; 609.749, subdivision 3.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy.

 

 

Coulter introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4679, A bill for an act relating to lobbyist registration; exempting certain activities from the definition of "lobbyist"; requiring the Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board to conduct a study; amending Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 10A.01, subdivision 21.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Elections Finance and Policy.

 

 

Schomacker and Brand introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4680, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money to predesign, design, construct, furnish, and equip an assisted living and memory care facility in the city of Slayton.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Feist introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4681, A bill for an act relating to public safety; requiring peace officer training on issues relating to child protection; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 626.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy.

 

 

Curran; Hanson, J.; Edelson; Kiel and Neu Brindley introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4682, A bill for an act relating to human services; modifying community services and supports requirements for support workers to qualify for an enhanced rate; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 256B.85, subdivision 16.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Human Services Finance.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11689

Agbaje; Frazier; Hornstein; Freiberg; Nelson, M.; Sencer-Mura and Lee, F., introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4683, A bill for an act relating to transportation; establishing Blue Line light rail transit extension antidisplacement community prosperity program; requiring a report; appropriating money; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 473.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.

 

 

Hollins; Lee, F.; Kraft; Acomb and Hansen, R., introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4684, A bill for an act relating to climate; appropriating money for a study on climate-change adaptation costs; requiring a report.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy.

 

 

Bennett introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4685, A bill for an act relating to transportation; appropriating money for an interchange at marked Interstate Highway 90 and Freeborn County State-Aid Highway 20 in the city of Albert Lea; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Hicks introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4686, A bill for an act relating to education; modifying the process to resolve a dispute through a mediator or department complaint process; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 125A.091, subdivisions 10, 12, 15, by adding a subdivision.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Education Policy.

 

 

Dotseth and Altendorf introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4687, A bill for an act relating to environment; prohibiting certain harmful atmospheric activity; providing penalties; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 116.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy.

 

 

Hemmingsen-Jaeger, Carroll, Kraft and Stephenson introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4688, A bill for an act relating to energy; establishing a utility thermal energy network deployment work group; requiring a report.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Climate and Energy Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11690

Hemmingsen-Jaeger, Carroll, Kraft and Stephenson introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4689, A bill for an act relating to energy; establishing a geothermal heat exchange system rebate program; establishing an account; appropriating money; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 216C.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Climate and Energy Finance and Policy.

 

 

Frazier, Hussein, Hassan, Xiong, Noor, Hollins and Agbaje introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4690, A bill for an act relating to economic development; appropriating money for the Minnesota Black Chamber of Commerce.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Workforce Development Finance and Policy.

 

 

Koegel introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4691, A bill for an act relating to local government; providing that the state shall indemnify Ramsey County and Ramsey County Regional Railroad Authority for excess liability resulting from rail-related incidents occurring at Union Depot in the city of St. Paul; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 383A.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State and Local Government Finance and Policy.

 

 

Noor and Fischer introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4692, A bill for an act relating to human services; establishing Direct Care and Treatment as an agency; modifying date for transfer of authority and responsibility from the commissioner of human services to the Direct Care and Treatment executive board; establishing Direct Care and Treatment executive board membership qualifications, procedures, powers, and duties; authorizing rulemaking; establishing role of Direct Care and Treatment chief executive officer; establishing chief executive officer powers and duties; establishing Direct Care and Treatment accounts; modifying terms of the social welfare fund; modifying certain effective dates; providing for initial appointment of Direct Care and Treatment executive board and chief executive officer; exempting Direct Care and Treatment buildings and structures from commissioner of administration repair duties; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 13.46, subdivisions 1, 10; 16B.24, subdivisions 2, 3a; 16B.297, subdivision 1; 145.61, subdivision 5; 246.018, subdivision 3; 246.13, subdivision 2; 256.88; 256.89; 256.90; 256.91; 256.92; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 10.65, subdivision 2; 13.46, subdivision 2; 15.01; 15.06, subdivision 1; 43A.08, subdivisions 1, 1a; 246C.01; 246C.02; 246C.04; 246C.05; Laws 2023, chapter 61, article 8, sections 1; 2; 3; 8; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 246C; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 246.01; 246.12; 246.234; 246.36; 246.41; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 246C.03.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Human Services Policy.

 

 

Noor introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4693, A bill for an act relating to human services; directing the commissioner of human services to apply for a federal waiver for money for services provided to patients in an institution for mental diseases.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Human Services Finance.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11691

Demuth introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4694, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for a new emergency services center in the city of Paynesville; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Demuth introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4695, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for wastewater treatment facility improvements in the city of Cold Spring; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Demuth introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4696, A bill for an act relating to safety; providing notice if a student is left on a school bus; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 123B.91, by adding a subdivision.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Education Policy.

 

 

Pinto introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4697, A bill for an act relating to child protection; modifying membership and requirements for the child mortality review panel; modifying the review process for child fatalities and near fatalities related to maltreatment; modifying the Department of Human Services child systemic critical incident review team requirements; establishing the critical incident public information portal; amending Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 256.01, subdivision 12b; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 260E; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 256.01, subdivisions 12, 12a; Minnesota Rules, part 9560.0232, subpart 5.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Children and Families Finance and Policy.

 

 

Pursell introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4698, A bill for an act relating to environment; requiring rulemaking to require environmental impact statement for large animal projects.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Agriculture Finance and Policy.

 

 

Pursell and Hansen, R., introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4699, A bill for an act relating to agriculture; amending provisions related to pesticides; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 18B.01, by adding a subdivision; 18B.305, subdivision 2; 18B.32, subdivisions 1, 3, 4; 18B.33, subdivisions 1, 5; 18B.34, subdivisions 1, 4; 18B.35, subdivision 1; 18B.36, subdivisions 1, 2; 18B.37, subdivisions 2, 3.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Agriculture Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11692

Long introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4700, A bill for an act relating to energy; establishing the Minnesota Energy Infrastructure Permitting Act; modifying provisions governing certificates of need; making conforming and technical changes; authorizing administrative rulemaking; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 216A.037, subdivision 1; 216B.2421, subdivision 2; 216B.243, subdivisions 3, 3a, 4, 9; 216E.08, subdivision 2; 216E.11; 216E.13; 216E.14; 216E.15; 216E.16; 216E.18, subdivision 2a; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 216B.243, subdivision 8; 216E.06; 216E.07; 216E.10, subdivisions 1, 2, 3; proposing coding for new law as Minnesota Statutes, chapter 216I; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 216E.001; 216E.01, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10; 216E.02; 216E.03, subdivisions 2, 3a, 3b, 4, 9; 216E.04, subdivisions 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; 216E.05, subdivisions 1, 3; 216E.08, subdivisions 1, 4; 216E.18, subdivisions 1, 2; 216F.01; 216F.011; 216F.012; 216F.015; 216F.02; 216F.03; 216F.05; 216F.06; 216F.07; 216F.08; 216F.081; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 216E.01, subdivisions 3a, 6, 9a; 216E.03, subdivisions 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11; 216E.04, subdivision 2; 216E.05, subdivision 2; 216F.04; Minnesota Rules, parts 7850.1000; 7850.1100; 7850.1200; 7850.1300; 7850.1400; 7850.1500; 7850.1600; 7850.1700; 7850.1800; 7850.1900; 7850.2000; 7850.2100; 7850.2200; 7850.2300; 7850.2400; 7850.2500; 7850.2600; 7850.2700; 7850.2800; 7850.2900; 7850.3000; 7850.3100; 7850.3200; 7850.3300; 7850.3400; 7850.3500; 7850.3600; 7850.3700; 7850.3800; 7850.3900; 7850.4000; 7850.4100; 7850.4200; 7850.4500; 7850.4600; 7850.4700; 7850.4800; 7850.4900; 7850.5000; 7850.5100; 7850.5200; 7850.5300; 7850.5400; 7850.5500; 7850.5600; 7854.0100; 7854.0200; 7854.0300; 7854.0400; 7854.0500; 7854.0600; 7854.0700; 7854.0800; 7854.0900; 7854.1000; 7854.1100; 7854.1200; 7854.1300; 7854.1400; 7854.1500.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Climate and Energy Finance and Policy.

 

 

Pursell introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4701, A bill for an act relating to workforce development; establishing the next generation farmer development program; requiring reports; appropriating money; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 116L.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Agriculture Finance and Policy.

 

 

Hill introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4702, A bill for an act relating to energy; appropriating money for energy improvements at a wildlife rehabilitation center.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Climate and Energy Finance and Policy.

 

 

Pfarr, Harder, Koznick, Nash, Wiener and Joy introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4703, A bill for an act relating to agriculture; defining cell-cultured meat and cell-cultured poultry; requiring food labels to identify a product containing cell-cultured meat or cell-cultured poultry; amending the definition of meat food product and poultry food product to include cell-cultured meat and cell-cultured poultry; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 31.01, by adding subdivisions; 31.12; 31.633; 31A.02, subdivision 10.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Agriculture Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11693

Schultz and Anderson, P. H., introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4704, A bill for an act relating to utilities; requiring water utilities to allow residential customers to decline installation of an advanced water meter; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 444.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State and Local Government Finance and Policy.

 

 

Bliss and Fischer introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4705, A bill for an act relating to direct care and treatment; retroactively eliminating the county share for certain direct care and treatment services; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 246.54, subdivisions 1a, 1b.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Human Services Finance.

 

 

Stephenson introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4706, A bill for an act relating to public safety; clarifying the revocation of stay provision relating to certain stays of adjudication and deferred prosecutions; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 609.14, by adding a subdivision.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy.

 

 

Sencer-Mura introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4707, A bill for an act relating to transportation; establishing a pavement art pilot program; requiring a report; appropriating money.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.

 

 

Wolgamott; Koegel; Nelson, M.; Murphy and Petersburg introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4708, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for the local road wetland replacement program; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Hollins introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4709, A bill for an act relating to energy; appropriating money for a renewable energy certificate tracking system.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Climate and Energy Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11694

Acomb introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4710, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for the Opus Public Space project in the city of Minnetonka; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Acomb introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4711, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for improvements to The Marsh in the city of Minnetonka; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Daniels introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4712, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; extending an appropriation for a water improvement project at French Lake.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy.

 

 

Curran introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4713, A bill for an act relating to occupational health and safety; requiring the commissioner of labor and industry to adopt rules related to acceptable blood lead levels for workers.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Labor and Industry Finance and Policy.

 

 

Torkelson introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4714, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for improvements to storm sewer infrastructure and street reconstruction in the city of Revere; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Torkelson introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4715, A bill for an act relating to education; prohibiting school activities at certain times; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 120A.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Education Policy.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11695

Urdahl; Olson, B., and Davids introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4716, A bill for an act relating to state government; modifying the effective date of the state flag and state seal designs adopted by the State Emblems Redesign Commission to be contingent on the affirmative vote of two-thirds of the house of representatives and two-thirds of the senate; amending Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 1.135, subdivisions 3a, 6; Laws 2023, chapter 62, article 2, sections 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 133, subdivision 1.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State and Local Government Finance and Policy.

 

 

Hemmingsen-Jaeger introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4717, A bill for an act relating to commerce; defining terms relating to virtual currency; adding additional disclosure requirements for virtual currency transactions; amending Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 53B.69, by adding subdivisions; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 53B.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.

 

 

Skraba introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4718, A bill for an act relating to higher education; appropriating money for transfer to the Cook County Higher Education Board.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Higher Education Finance and Policy.

 

 

Hassan, Noor, Hussein, Xiong and Gomez introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4719, A bill for an act relating to housing; appropriating money for a grant to Somali Community Resettlement Services for a development project in the city of Minneapolis.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Economic Development Finance and Policy.

 

 

Petersburg introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4720, A bill for an act relating to transportation; canceling previous appropriations; appropriating money for road projects.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.

 

 

Jordan introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4721, A bill for an act relating to solid waste; establishing stewardship program for batteries; authorizing rulemaking; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 115A.1310, subdivision 12c; 325E.125, subdivision 2; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 115A; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 115A.9155; 115A.9157, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; 325E.125, subdivisions 3, 4, 5.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11696

Pursell, Jordan, Clardy and Xiong introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4722, A bill for an act relating to higher education; creating a pilot program to provide meal stipends to full-time PSEO students; requiring a report; appropriating money.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Higher Education Finance and Policy.

 

 

Bahner, Hemmingsen-Jaeger, Moller and Howard introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4723, A bill for an act relating to common interest communities; governing the right of unit owners to speak at board meetings and proxy voting; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 515B.3-103; 515B.3-110.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.

 

 

Skraba and Zeleznikar introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4724, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for the Gitchi Gami State Trail; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Virnig introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4725, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for water infrastructure in the city of Mendota; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Stephenson introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4726, A bill for an act relating to commerce; regulating private student loan servicers; providing for civil penalties; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 58B.06, subdivisions 4, 5; 58B.07, subdivisions 1, 3, 4, 9, by adding subdivisions; 58B.09, by adding a subdivision; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 58B.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law.

 

 

Pinto introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4727, A bill for an act relating to child protection; creating a Child Protection Advisory Council; requiring reports; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 260E.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Children and Families Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11697

Bahner, Freiberg, Greenman, Torkelson, Altendorf and Quam introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4728, A bill for an act relating to elections; requiring the commissioner of revenue to establish an online system to claim the political contribution refund; amending the political contribution refund program to allow for electronic information transfer between the Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board and the Department of Revenue; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 10A.02, subdivision 11b; 10A.322, subdivision 4; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 290.06, subdivision 23.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Elections Finance and Policy.

 

 

Davids introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4729, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for a regional ice arena in the city of La Crescent; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Rarick introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4730, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for a new public works facility in the city of Monticello; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Rarick introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4731, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for a water treatment facility in the city of Monticello; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Pinto introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4732, A bill for an act relating to early childhood education; clarifying the payment of developmental screening aid; amending Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 121A.19.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Children and Families Finance and Policy.

 

 

Schomacker introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4733, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for Phase 2 of a new highway department maintenance facility in Murray County; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11698

Kozlowski, Wolgamott and Urdahl introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4734, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for capital improvements for greater Minnesota transit systems; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Howard introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4735, A bill for an act relating to housing; modifying housing provisions; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 462A.02, subdivision 10; 462A.05, subdivisions 14a, 14b, 15, 15b, 21, 23; 462A.07, by adding subdivisions; 462A.21, subdivision 7; 462A.35, subdivision 2; 462A.40, subdivisions 2, 3; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 462A.05, subdivisions 14, 45; 462A.22, subdivision 1; 462A.37, subdivision 2; 462A.39, subdivision 2; Laws 2023, chapter 37, article 1, section 2, subdivisions 2, 32; article 2, section 12, subdivision 2.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Housing Finance and Policy.

 

 

Clardy introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4736, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for Thompson County Park in Dakota County; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Backer and Grossell introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4737, A bill for an act proposing an amendment to the Minnesota Constitution, article IV, sections 2 and 3; changing the composition apportionment of legislative districts; making conforming statutory changes; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 2.021; 2.031.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Elections Finance and Policy.

 

 

Huot introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4738, A bill for an act relating to health; establishing an Office of Emergency Medical Services to replace the Emergency Medical Services Regulatory Board; specifying duties for the office; transferring duties; establishing an advisory council; making conforming changes; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 62J.49, subdivision 1; 144E.001, by adding subdivisions; 144E.16, subdivision 5; 144E.19, subdivision 3; 144E.27, subdivision 5; 144E.28, subdivisions 5, 6; 144E.285, subdivision 6; 144E.287; 144E.305, subdivision 3; 214.025; 214.04, subdivision 2a; 214.29; 214.31; 214.355; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 15A.0815, subdivision 2; 43A.08, subdivision 1a; 152.126, subdivision 6; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 144E; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 144E.001, subdivision 5; 144E.01; 144E.123, subdivision 5; 144E.50, subdivision 3.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11699

Virnig, Gomez, Curran, Keeler and Fischer introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4739, A bill for an act relating to human services; modifying the general assistance standard of assistance; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 256D.01, subdivision 1b.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

 

Burkel and Bliss introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4740, A bill for an act relating to liquor; permitting cities to issue certain on-sale licenses and modifying list of licensees to include a golf course; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 340A.404, subdivisions 1, 6.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.

 

 

Heintzeman introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4741, A bill for an act relating to transportation; specifying the warning lights that volunteer first responders are authorized to use in their personal vehicles when responding to a call; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 169.58, subdivisions 2, 3; 169.64, subdivision 3.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.

 

 

Rehm introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4742, A bill for an act relating to veterans; requesting the University of Minnesota Landscape Arboretum provide free access to disabled veterans; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 197.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Veterans and Military Affairs Finance and Policy.

 

 

Huot introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4743, A bill for an act relating to public safety; regulating the manufacture, sale, and use of fireworks; dedicating a portion of revenues from the sale of certain fireworks for public safety purposes; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 624.20, subdivision 1; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 297A.94.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy.

 

 

Jordan, Gomez, Bahner, Noor, Greenman and Hassan introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4744, A bill for an act relating to Hennepin County; requiring a majority vote to approve budget; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 383B.908, subdivision 5.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State and Local Government Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11700

Long; Hortman; Reyer; Stephenson; Finke; Agbaje; Frederick; Hassan; Frazier; Xiong; Tabke; Hornstein; Smith; Clardy; Brand; Coulter; Greenman; Freiberg; Pursell; Hollins; Hanson, J.; Pérez-Vega; Jordan; Olson, L.; Howard; Acomb; Hussein; Cha; Nelson, M.; Kotyza-Witthuhn; Lillie; Gomez and Koegel introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4745, A bill for an act relating to health; establishing the MinnesotaCare public option; expanding eligibility for MinnesotaCare; establishing a premium scale for public option enrollees; providing state-funded cost‑sharing reductions; establishing a contingent health insurance premium tax credit; requiring the commissioner of commerce to seek a section 1332 waiver; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 62V.02, by adding subdivisions; 62V.03, subdivisions 1, 3; 62V.05, subdivisions 3, 6, 11, by adding a subdivision; 62V.051; 62V.06, subdivision 4; 256L.01, by adding subdivisions; 256L.04, subdivisions 1c, 7a, by adding a subdivision; 256L.07, subdivision 1; 256L.12, subdivision 7; 290.0122, subdivision 6; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 62V.13, subdivision 3; 256L.03, subdivision 5; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 62V; 256L.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.

 

 

Hassan, Noor, Hussein and Long introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4746, A bill for an act relating to labor; regulating transportation network companies; providing a civil cause of action; imposing criminal penalties; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 65B.472; proposing coding for new law as Minnesota Statutes, chapter 181C.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.

 

 

Howard; Lee, K., and Hollins introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4747, A bill for an act relating to taxation; property; tax increment financing; authorizing use of tax increment from redevelopment districts to convert vacant or underused commercial or industrial buildings to residential purposes; providing rules for calculating the original net tax capacity of property to be converted from commercial or industrial to residential purposes; exempting districts established to convert vacant or underused commercial or industrial buildings to residential purposes from the market value finding requirement; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 469.174, subdivision 10; 469.175, subdivision 3; 469.176, subdivision 4j; 469.177, subdivision 1.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Taxes.

 

 

Bahner and Elkins introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4748, A bill for an act relating to state government; clarifying discretionary powers and duties for the Department of Information Technology Services; making conforming changes; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 15.994; 16E.01, subdivision 2; 16E.03, subdivisions 3, 4, 5, 7; 16E.04, subdivisions 2, 3; 16E.07; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 16E.01, subdivision 3; 16E.03, subdivision 2; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 16E.03, subdivision 5; 16E.035; 16E.0465, subdivisions 1, 2; 16E.055; 16E.20.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State and Local Government Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11701

Bahner and Elkins introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4749, A bill for an act relating to cybersecurity; requiring reporting of cybersecurity incidents impacting public-sector organizations in Minnesota; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 16E.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State and Local Government Finance and Policy.

 

 

Franson introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4750, A bill for an act relating to real property; providing for the protection of private property rights; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 500.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law.

 

 

Franson introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4751, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; extending the availability of an appropriation for renovation of the Runestone Community Center in Alexandria; amending Laws 2020, Fifth Special Session chapter 3, article 1, section 21, subdivision 7.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Bennett, Mueller, Bakeberg, Daniels, Perryman and Scott introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4752, A bill for an act relating to education; requiring firearm safety instruction in school; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 120B.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Education Policy.

 

 

Pelowski introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4753, A bill for an act relating to disaster relief; requiring the allocation of general fund surplus dollars to the disaster assistance contingency account; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 16A.152, subdivision 1b; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 16A.152, subdivision 2.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Public Safety Finance and Policy.

 

 

Nelson, N., and Dotseth introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4754, A bill for an act relating to taxation; refund and sharing agreements; modifying certain payments to counties; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 270C.19, subdivision 4.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Taxes.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11702

Liebling introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4755, A bill for an act relating to health; modifying reporting requirements for 340B covered entities; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 62J; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 62J.312, subdivision 6.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

 

Hicks introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4756, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for accessible housing units owned by Accessible Space, Inc., in the city of Rochester.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Stephenson introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4757, A bill for an act relating to state government; modifying cannabis provisions; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 3.9224; 151.72, subdivisions 1, 2, 4, 5a, 5b, 6, 7; 256B.0625, subdivision 13d; 290.0132, subdivision 29; 290.0134, subdivision 19; 295.81, subdivisions 1, 4; 297A.70, subdivision 2; 342.01, subdivisions 3, 4, 14, 16, 17, 19, 20, 48, 64, 65, 66, by adding a subdivision; 342.02, subdivisions 2, 3, 5, 6; 342.07, subdivision 3; 342.09, subdivisions 1, 3; 342.10; 342.11; 342.12; 342.13; 342.14; 342.15, subdivisions 1, 2, by adding a subdivision; 342.17; 342.18, subdivision 3, by adding subdivisions; 342.19, subdivisions 1, 3, 4, 5; 342.22; 342.24, subdivisions 1, 2; 342.28, subdivision 2, by adding a subdivision; 342.29, subdivisions 1, 4; 342.30, subdivision 4; 342.31, subdivision 4; 342.32, subdivision 4; 342.35, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 342.37, subdivision 1; 342.40, subdivision 7; 342.41, subdivisions 1, 3; 342.44, subdivision 1; 342.51; 342.515; 342.52, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 11; 342.53; 342.54; 342.55, subdivisions 1, 2; 342.56, subdivisions 1, 2; 342.57, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7; 342.58; 342.60; 342.61, subdivisions 4, 5; 342.63, subdivisions 2, 3, 4, 6; Laws 2023, chapter 63, article 1, sections 2; 51; 52; 53; 54; 55; 56; 57; 58; 59; 61; article 6, section 73; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 342; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 342.01, subdivisions 28, 52, 53, 54, 55; 342.18, subdivision 1; 342.27, subdivision 13; 342.29, subdivision 9; 342.47; 342.48; 342.49; 342.50; 342.52, subdivision 8; Laws 2023, chapter 63, article 7, sections 4; 6.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.

 

 

Reyer introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4758, A bill for an act relating to health; clarifying an existing prohibition on charging fees for medical records to certain individuals; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 144.292, subdivision 6.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

 

Acomb, Kraft, Hollins, Stephenson and Rehm introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4759, A bill for an act relating to energy; establishing a program to award grants to political subdivisions to assess the feasibility of installing geothermal energy systems; appropriating money; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 216C.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Climate and Energy Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11703

Swedzinski introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4760, A bill for an act relating to taxation; property; providing an exemption for certain property owned or leased by congressionally chartered veterans organizations; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 272.02, by adding a subdivision; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, section 273.13, subdivision 25.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Veterans and Military Affairs Finance and Policy.

 

 

Stephenson introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4761, A bill for an act relating to labor; clarifying workplace testing for cannabis; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 181.950, subdivision 10; 181.952, as amended; Minnesota Statutes 2023 Supplement, sections 181.951, subdivisions 4, 5, 8; 181.954, subdivision 1.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Labor and Industry Finance and Policy.

 

 

Koegel introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4762, A bill for an act relating to motor vehicles; modifying certain limitations on towing authority; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 168B.035, subdivision 3.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.

 

 

Lee, F., introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4763, A bill for an act relating to state government; changing the date for a required report; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 16A.642, subdivision 1.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

REPORTS FROM THE COMMITTEE ON RULES

AND LEGISLATIVE ADMINISTRATION

 

      Long from the Committee on Rules and Legislative Administration, pursuant to rules 1.21 and 3.33, designated the following bills to be placed on the Calendar for the Day for Thursday, March 7, 2024 and established a prefiling requirement for amendments offered to the following bills:

 

      S. F. No. 3546; and H. F. Nos. 3377, 3466, 3646 and 3987.

 

 

      Long from the Committee on Rules and Legislative Administration, pursuant to rules 1.21 and 3.33, designated the following bills to be placed on the Calendar for the Day for Monday, March 11, 2024 and established a prefiling requirement for amendments offered to the following bills:

 

      H. F. Nos. 3309, 3526, 3868 and 3520.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11704

CALENDAR FOR THE DAY

 

 

      S. F. No. 3546, A bill for an act relating to health-related occupations; clarifying licensed traditional midwife authority to obtain, possess, and administer certain drugs, supplies, and devices; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 147D.09; 151.37, by adding a subdivision.

 

 

      The bill was read for the third time and placed upon its final passage.

 

      The question was taken on the passage of the bill and the roll was called.  There were 129 yeas and 0 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Acomb

Agbaje

Anderson, P. E.

Anderson, P. H.

Backer

Bahner

Bakeberg

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Berg

Bierman

Bliss

Brand

Burkel

Carroll

Cha

Clardy

Coulter

Curran

Daniels

Davids

Davis

Demuth

Dotseth

Edelson

Elkins

Engen

Feist

Finke

Fischer

Fogelman

Franson

Frederick

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gillman

Gomez

Greenman

Hansen, R.

Hanson, J.

Harder

Hassan

Hemmingsen-Jaeger

Her

Hicks

Hill

Hollins

Hornstein

Howard

Hudella

Hudson

Huot

Hussein

Igo

Jacob

Johnson

Jordan

Joy

Keeler

Kiel

Klevorn

Knudsen

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Kozlowski

Koznick

Kraft

Kresha

Lee, F.

Lee, K.

Liebling

Lillie

Lislegard

Long

McDonald

Mekeland

Moller

Mueller

Murphy

Myers

Nadeau

Nash

Nelson, M.

Nelson, N.

Neu Brindley

Newton

Niska

Noor

Norris

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson, B.

Olson, L.

Pelowski

Pérez-Vega

Perryman

Petersburg

Pfarr

Pinto

Pryor

Pursell

Quam

Rarick

Rehm

Reyer

Robbins

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Sencer-Mura

Skraba

Smith

Stephenson

Swedzinski

Tabke

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

Virnig

West

Wiener

Wiens

Witte

Wolgamott

Xiong

Youakim

Zeleznikar

Spk. Hortman


 

 

      The bill was passed and its title agreed to.

 

 

      The Speaker called Her to the Chair.

 

 

      H. F. No. 3377, A bill for an act relating to natural resources; appropriating money from environment and natural resources trust fund; modifying previous appropriations; amending Laws 2019, First Special Session chapter 4, article 2, section 2, subdivision 9; Laws 2021, First Special Session chapter 6, article 6, section 2, subdivision 9; Laws 2022, chapter 94, section 2, subdivisions 9, as amended, 10; Laws 2023, chapter 60, article 2, section 2, subdivision 9.


Journal of the House - 89th Day - Thursday, March 7, 2024 - Top of Page 11705

         The bill was read for the third time and placed upon its final passage.

 

      The question was taken on the passage of the bill and the roll was called.  There were 94 yeas and 35 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Acomb

Agbaje

Bahner

Bakeberg

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Berg

Bierman

Brand

Carroll

Cha

Clardy

Coulter

Curran

Demuth

Edelson

Elkins

Engen

Feist

Finke