Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3735

 

 

STATE OF MINNESOTA

 

 

NINETY-THIRD SESSION - 2023

 

_____________________

 

FORTY-SEVENTH DAY

 

Saint Paul, Minnesota, Wednesday, April 12, 2023

 

 

      The House of Representatives convened at 12:30 p.m. and was called to order by Dan Wolgamott, Speaker pro tempore.

 

      Prayer was offered by the Reverend Pepe Demarest, The Recovery Church, St. Paul, Minnesota.

 

      The members of the House gave the pledge of allegiance to the flag of the United States of America.

 

      The roll was called and the following members were present:

 


Acomb

Agbaje

Altendorf

Anderson, P. H.

Backer

Bahner

Bakeberg

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Berg

Bierman

Bliss

Brand

Burkel

Carroll

Cha

Clardy

Coulter

Curran

Daniels

Davids

Davis

Demuth

Dotseth

Edelson

Elkins

Engen

Feist

Finke

Fischer

Fogelman

Franson

Frazier

Frederick

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gillman

Gomez

Greenman

Grossell

Hansen, R.

Hanson, J.

Harder

Hassan

Heintzeman

Hemmingsen-Jaeger

Her

Hicks

Hill

Hollins

Hornstein

Howard

Hudella

Hudson

Huot

Hussein

Igo

Jacob

Johnson

Jordan

Joy

Keeler

Klevorn

Knudsen

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Koznick

Kraft

Kresha

Lee, F.

Lee, K.

Liebling

Lillie

Lislegard

Long

McDonald

Mekeland

Moller

Mueller

Murphy

Myers

Nadeau

Nash

Nelson, M.

Nelson, N.

Neu Brindley

Newton

Niska

Noor

Norris

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson, L.

O'Neill

Pelowski

Pérez-Vega

Perryman

Petersburg

Pfarr

Pinto

Pryor

Pursell

Quam

Rehm

Reyer

Richardson

Robbins

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Sencer-Mura

Skraba

Smith

Stephenson

Swedzinski

Tabke

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

West

Wiener

Wiens

Witte

Wolgamott

Xiong

Youakim

Zeleznikar

Spk. Hortman


 

      A quorum was present.

 

      Anderson, P. E.; Daudt; Kiel; Kozlowski and Olson, B., were excused.

 

      The Chief Clerk proceeded to read the Journal of the preceding day.  There being no objection, further reading of the Journal was dispensed with and the Journal was approved as corrected by the Chief Clerk.


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3736

PETITIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS

 

 

      The following communications were received:

 

 

STATE OF MINNESOTA

OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR

SAINT PAUL 55155

 

March 30, 2023

 

The Honorable Melissa Hortman

Speaker of the House of Representatives

The State of Minnesota

 

Dear Speaker Hortman:

 

      Please be advised that I have received, approved, signed, and deposited in the Office of the Secretary of State the following House Files:

 

      H. F. No. 1440, relating to housing; appropriating money for the family homeless prevention and assistance program; requiring a report.

 

      H. F. No. 244, relating to uniform laws; adopting the Uniform Electronic Wills Act; making technical, clarifying, and conforming changes.

 

                                                                                                                                Sincerely,

 

                                                                                                                                Tim Walz

                                                                                                                                Governor

 

 

STATE OF MINNESOTA

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE

ST. PAUL 55155

 

The Honorable Melissa Hortman

Speaker of the House of Representatives

 

The Honorable Bobby Joe Champion

President of the Senate

 

      I have the honor to inform you that the following enrolled Acts of the 2023 Session of the State Legislature have been received from the Office of the Governor and are deposited in the Office of the Secretary of State for preservation, pursuant to the State Constitution, Article IV, Section 23:

 

 

S. F.

No.

 

H. F.

No.

 

Session Laws

Chapter No.

Time and

Date Approved

2023

 

Date Filed

2023

 

                                1440                        20                                         7:39 p.m.  March 30                             March 30

                                  244                        21                                         7:40 p.m.  March 30                             March 30


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3737

       2265                                                                                                           22           7:41 p.m.  March 30 March 30

       1816                                                 23                                         2:37 p.m.  April 5                                  April 5

 

                                                                                                                                Sincerely,

 

                                                                                                                                Steve Simon

                                                                                                                                Secretary of State

 

 

REPORTS OF STANDING COMMITTEES AND DIVISIONS

 

 

Stephenson from the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 2, A bill for an act relating to employment; providing for paid family, pregnancy, bonding, and applicant's serious medical condition benefits; regulating and requiring certain employment leaves; classifying certain data; authorizing rulemaking; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 13.719, by adding a subdivision; 177.27, subdivision 4; 181.032; 256J.561, by adding a subdivision; 256J.95, subdivisions 3, 11; 256P.01, subdivision 3; 268.19, subdivision 1; proposing coding for new law as Minnesota Statutes, chapter 268B.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 1, after line 24, insert:

 

"Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 62A.01, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Definition.  The term "policy of accident and sickness insurance" as used herein includes any policy covering the kind of insurance described in section 60A.06, subdivision 1, clause (5)(a), or the paid family and medical leave benefits as described in section 268B.10."

 

Page 4, after line 20, insert:

 

"Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 256B.0659, subdivision 18, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 18.  Personal care assistance choice option; generally.  (a) The commissioner may allow a recipient of personal care assistance services to use a fiscal intermediary to assist the recipient in paying and accounting for medically necessary covered personal care assistance services.  Unless otherwise provided in this section, all other statutory and regulatory provisions relating to personal care assistance services apply to a recipient using the personal care assistance choice option.

 

(b) Personal care assistance choice is an option of the personal care assistance program that allows the recipient who receives personal care assistance services to be responsible for the hiring, training, scheduling, and firing of personal care assistants according to the terms of the written agreement with the personal care assistance choice agency required under subdivision 20, paragraph (a).  This program offers greater control and choice for the recipient in who provides the personal care assistance service and when the service is scheduled.  The recipient or the recipient's responsible party must choose a personal care assistance choice provider agency as a fiscal intermediary.  This personal care assistance choice provider agency manages payroll, invoices the state, is responsible for all payroll-related taxes and insurance, including premiums for family and medical benefit insurance, and is responsible for providing the consumer training and support in managing the recipient's personal care assistance services.


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3738

Sec. 5.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 256B.85, subdivision 13, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 13.  Budget model.  (a) Under the budget model participants exercise responsibility and control over the services and supports described and budgeted within the CFSS service delivery plan.  Participants must use services specified in subdivision 13a provided by an FMS provider.  Under this model, participants may use their approved service budget allocation to:

 

(1) directly employ support workers, and pay wages, federal and state payroll taxes, and premiums for workers' compensation, liability, family and medical benefit insurance, and health insurance coverage; and

 

(2) obtain supports and goods as defined in subdivision 7.

 

(b) Participants who are unable to fulfill any of the functions listed in paragraph (a) may authorize a legal representative or participant's representative to do so on their behalf.

 

(c) If two or more participants using the budget model live in the same household and have the same support worker, the participants must use the same FMS provider.

 

(d) If the FMS provider advises that there is a joint employer in the budget model, all participants associated with that joint employer must use the same FMS provider.

 

(e) The commissioner shall disenroll or exclude participants from the budget model and transfer them to the agency-provider model under, but not limited to, the following circumstances:

 

(1) when a participant has been restricted by the Minnesota restricted recipient program, in which case the participant may be excluded for a specified time period under Minnesota Rules, parts 9505.2160 to 9505.2245;

 

(2) when a participant exits the budget model during the participant's service plan year.  Upon transfer, the participant shall not access the budget model for the remainder of that service plan year; or

 

(3) when the department determines that the participant or participant's representative or legal representative is unable to fulfill the responsibilities under the budget model, as specified in subdivision 14.

 

(f) A participant may appeal in writing to the department under section 256.045, subdivision 3, to contest the department's decision under paragraph (e), clause (3), to disenroll or exclude the participant from the budget model.

 

Sec. 6.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 256B.85, subdivision 13a, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 13a.  Financial management services.  (a) Services provided by an FMS provider include but are not limited to:  filing and payment of federal and state payroll taxes and premiums on behalf of the participant; initiating and complying with background study requirements under chapter 245C and maintaining documentation of background study requests and results; billing for approved CFSS services with authorized funds; monitoring expenditures; accounting for and disbursing CFSS funds; providing assistance in obtaining and filing for liability, workers' compensation, family and medical benefit insurance, and unemployment coverage; and providing participant instruction and technical assistance to the participant in fulfilling employer-related requirements in accordance with section 3504 of the Internal Revenue Code and related regulations and interpretations, including Code of Federal Regulations, title 26, section 31.3504-1.

 

(b) Agency-provider services shall not be provided by the FMS provider.

 

(c) The FMS provider shall provide service functions as determined by the commissioner for budget model participants that include but are not limited to:


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3739

(1) assistance with the development of the detailed budget for expenditures portion of the CFSS service delivery plan as requested by the consultation services provider or participant;

 

(2) data recording and reporting of participant spending;

 

(3) other duties established by the department, including with respect to providing assistance to the participant, participant's representative, or legal representative in performing employer responsibilities regarding support workers.  The support worker shall not be considered the employee of the FMS provider; and

 

(4) billing, payment, and accounting of approved expenditures for goods.

 

(d) The FMS provider shall obtain an assurance statement from the participant employer agreeing to follow state and federal regulations and CFSS policies regarding employment of support workers.

 

(e) The FMS provider shall:

 

(1) not limit or restrict the participant's choice of service or support providers or service delivery models consistent with any applicable state and federal requirements;

 

(2) provide the participant, consultation services provider, and case manager or care coordinator, if applicable, with a monthly written summary of the spending for services and supports that were billed against the spending budget;

 

(3) be knowledgeable of state and federal employment regulations, including those under the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, and comply with the requirements under chapter 268B and section 3504 of the Internal Revenue Code and related regulations and interpretations, including Code of Federal Regulations, title 26, section 31.3504-1, regarding agency employer tax liability for vendor fiscal/employer agent, and any requirements necessary to process employer and employee deductions, provide appropriate and timely submission of employer tax liabilities, and maintain documentation to support medical assistance claims;

 

(4) have current and adequate liability insurance and bonding and sufficient cash flow as determined by the commissioner and have on staff or under contract a certified public accountant or an individual with a baccalaureate degree in accounting;

 

(5) assume fiscal accountability for state funds designated for the program and be held liable for any overpayments or violations of applicable statutes or rules, including but not limited to the Minnesota False Claims Act, chapter 15C;

 

(6) maintain documentation of receipts, invoices, and bills to track all services and supports expenditures for any goods purchased and maintain time records of support workers.  The documentation and time records must be maintained for a minimum of five years from the claim date and be available for audit or review upon request by the commissioner.  Claims submitted by the FMS provider to the commissioner for payment must correspond with services, amounts, and time periods as authorized in the participant's service budget and service plan and must contain specific identifying information as determined by the commissioner; and

 

(7) provide written notice to the participant or the participant's representative at least 30 calendar days before a proposed service termination becomes effective.

 

(f) The commissioner shall:

 

(1) establish rates and payment methodology for the FMS provider;


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3740

(2) identify a process to ensure quality and performance standards for the FMS provider and ensure statewide access to FMS providers; and

 

(3) establish a uniform protocol for delivering and administering CFSS services to be used by eligible FMS providers."

 

Page 8, after line 16, insert:

 

"(e) For an applicant under a private plan as provided in section 268B.10, the base period is those most recent four quarters in which wage credits were earned with the current employer as provided by the current employer.  If an employer does not have four quarters of wage detail information, the employer must accept an employee's certification of wage credits, based on the employee's records.  If the employee does not provide certification of additional wage credits, the employer may use a base period that consists of all available quarters."

 

Page 8, line 22, delete ""Benefit year"" and insert "(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b), "benefit year""

 

Page 8, after line 25, insert:

 

"(b) For a private plan under section 268B.10, "benefit year" means:

 

(1) a calendar year;

 

(2) any fixed 12-month period, such as a fiscal year or a 12-month period measured forward from an employee's first date of employment;

 

(3) a 12-month period measured forward from an employee's first day of leave taken; or

 

(4) a rolling 12-month period measured backward from an employee's first day of leave taken.

 

Employers are required to notify employees of their benefit year within 30 days of the private plan approval and first day of employment."

 

Page 9, after line 4, insert:

 

"Subd. 13.  Construction industry.  "Construction industry" means any construction, reconstruction, building erection, alteration, remodel, repair, renovation, rehabilitation, excavation, or demolition of any building, structure, facility utility, power plant, sewer, dam, highway, road, street, airport, bridge, or other improvement.

 

Subd. 14.  Covered active duty.  "Covered active duty" has the meaning given in United States Code, title 29, section 2611(14)."

 

Renumber the subdivisions in sequence and correct the internal references

 

Page 11, line 7, delete "and"

 

Page 11, line 8, delete "affinity and" and after "whose" insert "close"

 

Page 11, line 13, delete the period and insert "; and"

 

Page 11, after line 13, insert:

 

"(7) up to one person designated by the applicant."


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3741

Page 11, line 26, after "surgeon," insert "podiatrist,"

 

Page 11, delete line 27 and insert "advanced practice registered nurse, alcohol and drug counselor, as defined in section 148F.01, subdivision 5, or mental health professional, as defined in section 245I.02, subdivision 27; or"

 

Page 12, line 24, delete "still birth" and insert "stillbirth"

 

Page 12, line 26, after "member's" insert "covered" and after "to" insert "covered"

 

Page 13, line 29, delete "at-home care or"

 

Page 14, line 5, after "times" insert ", within 30 days of the first day of incapacity, unless extenuating circumstances beyond the applicant's control prevent a follow-up visit from occurring as planned,"

 

Page 15, line 23, delete "hours" and delete "hours"

 

Page 19, line 31, after the period, insert "Appropriations and transfers to the account are credited to the account.  Earnings, such as interest, dividends, and any other earnings arising from assets of the account, are credited to the account.  Money remaining in the account at the end of a fiscal year are not canceled to the general fund but remain in the account until expended."

 

Page 21, line 3, after "filed" insert "up to 60 days before leave taken under section 268B.085"

 

Page 21, line 5, delete "at the time"

 

Page 21, line 6, delete "the application is filed"

 

Page 21, line 7, delete "does not meet eligibility at the time of the application or"

 

Page 22, line 27, delete "37" and insert "41"

 

Page 22, delete subdivision 5 and insert:

 

"Subd. 5.  Maximum length of benefits.  (a) In a single benefit year, an applicant may receive:

 

(1) up to 12 weeks of benefits under this chapter related to the applicant's serious health condition or pregnancy; and

 

(2) up to 12 weeks of benefits under this chapter:

 

(i) for bonding, safety leave, or family care; or

 

(ii) for leave related to one or more qualifying exigencies."

 

Page 24, line 13, delete "(a)"

 

Page 24, line 27, after "clause" insert "(3) or"

 

Page 24, line 31, delete "need not" and insert "must" and after "consecutive" insert ", unless the leave is intermittent"

 

Page 25, line 22, before the period, insert "or estimated due date"

 

Page 26, line 19, before the period, insert "from the employer from whom the applicant is taking leave under this chapter"


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3742

Page 26, delete subdivision 5 and insert:

 

"Subd. 5.  Vacation, sick leave, paid time off, and disability insurance payments.  (a) An employee may use vacation pay, sick pay, paid time off pay, or disability insurance payments, in lieu of family or medical leave program benefits under this chapter, provided the employee is concurrently eligible.  Subject to the limitations of section 268B.09, subdivision 1, an employee is entitled to the employment protections under section 268B.09 for those workdays during which this option is exercised.  This subdivision applies to private plans under section 268B.10.

 

(b) An employer may offer a supplemental benefit payment, as defined in section 268B.01, subdivision 41, to an employee on family or medical leave in addition to any paid family or medical leave benefits the employee is receiving.  The choice to receive a supplemental benefit payment lies with the employee.  Nothing in this section shall be construed as requiring an employee to receive, or an employer to provide, a supplemental benefit payment."

 

Page 27, line 3, delete "and disability insurance"

 

Page 27, line 7, after the semicolon, insert "or"

 

Page 27, line 8, delete "; or" and insert a period

 

Page 27, delete line 9

 

Page 28, line 14, after "(1)" insert "or (2)"

 

Page 29, line 4, after "weeks" insert ", unless the application is incomplete due to outstanding requests for information including clerical or other errors.  Nothing prohibits the commissioner from requesting additional information or the applicant from supplementing their initial application before a determination of eligibility.  The commissioner may extend the deadline for a determination under this subdivision due to extenuating circumstances"

 

Page 30, line 28, before "Ninety" insert "(a)"

 

Page 30, line 29, delete "which the employee" and insert "which:  (1) the employee meets the eligibility criteria under section 268B.06, subdivision 1, clause (2); or"

 

Page 30 delete line 30

 

Page 31, delete lines 1 and 2 and insert:

 

"(2) the employee has applied for benefits in good faith under this chapter.  For the purposes of this subdivision, good faith is defined as anything that is not knowingly false or in reckless disregard of the truth.

 

(b) Notwithstanding paragraph (a), an employee no longer has a right to leave following a denial of benefits by a benefit judge.  The employee's right to leave under this section is not to exceed the maximum length of benefits under section 268B.04, subdivision 5."

 

Page 31, after line 29, insert:

 

"(e) An employer may require that an employee taking leave under this chapter provide a copy of the certification under section 268B.06, subdivision 3.  Upon a written request from the employer, the employee shall provide a copy of the certification as soon as practicable given all of the facts and circumstances in the individual situation.  Providing certification at or around the time the employee provides a certification to the department is considered practicable.  In addition to any prohibition imposed under section 268B.09, an employer must not discharge, discipline, penalize, interfere with, threaten, restrain, coerce, or otherwise retaliate or discriminate against an employee for providing this certification."


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3743

Page 31, line 30, delete "(e)" and insert "(f)"

 

Page 32, line 3, after the period, insert "Employees may also use bonding leave under this chapter before the actual placement or adoption of a child in situations that include but are not limited to an employee's requirement to:  attend counseling sessions; appear in court; consult with any attorney or doctor representing the birth parent; submit to a physical examination; or travel to another country to complete an adoption."

 

Page 32, after line 13, insert:

 

"(c) For applicants who take leave on an intermittent or reduced leave schedule, the weekly benefit amount is prorated."

 

Page 33, line 1, before "Any" insert "(a)"

 

Page 33, line 2, before the period, insert ", except for a voluntary settlement agreement resolving disputed claims or a valid separation agreement releasing putative claims"

 

Page 33, after line 2, insert:

 

"(b) Any provision, whether oral or written, of a lease, contract, or other agreement or instrument that purports to be a waiver by an individual of any right or remedy provided in this chapter is contrary to public policy and void if the waiver or release purports to waive claims arising out of acts or practices that occur after the execution of the waiver or release.

 

(c) A waiver or release of rights or remedies secured by this chapter that purports to apply to claims arising out of acts or practices prior to, or concurrent with, the execution of the waiver or release may be rescinded within 15 calendar days of its execution, except that a waiver or release given in settlement of a claim filed with the department or with another administrative agency or judicial body is valid and final upon execution.  A waiving or releasing party must be informed in writing of the right to rescind the waiver or release.  To be effective, the rescission must be in writing and delivered to the waived or released party by hand, electronically with the receiving party's consent, or by mail within the 15-day period.  If delivered by mail, the rescission must be:

 

(1) postmarked within the 15-day period;

 

(2) properly addressed to the waived or released party; and

 

(3) sent by certified mail, return receipt requested."

 

Page 33, line 4, before the period, insert ", except as provided under section 268B.10, subdivision 7"

 

Page 33, line 6, before "During" insert "(a)"

 

Page 33, line 7, after "benefits" insert "or leave"

 

Page 33, after line 10, insert:

 

"(b) This subdivision may be waived for employees who are working in the construction industry under a bona fide collective bargaining agreement that requires employer contributions to a multiemployer health plan pursuant to United States Code, title 29, section 186(c)(5), but only if the waiver is set forth in clear and unambiguous terms in the collective bargaining agreement and explicitly cites this subdivision."


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3744

Page 35, after line 16, insert:

 

"(g) Nothing in this section shall be deemed to affect the Americans with Disabilities Act, United States Code, title 42, chapter 126.

 

(h) This subdivision and subdivision 7 may be waived for employees who are working in the construction industry under a bona fide collective bargaining agreement with a construction trade union that maintains a referral‑to-work procedure for employees to obtain employment with multiple signatory employers, but only if the waiver is set forth in clear and unambiguous terms in the collective bargaining agreement and explicitly cites this subdivision and subdivision 7."

 

Page 36, delete lines 8 to 11 and insert:

 

"(i) any and all damages recoverable by law;"

 

Page 36, line 12, delete everything after "amount" and insert "of damages awarded; and"

 

Page 36, line 20, after "such" insert "injunctive and other" and delete "may be appropriate" and insert "determined by a court or jury"

 

Page 36, after line 26, insert:

 

"Rule 23 of the Rules of Civil Procedure applies to this section."

 

Page 37, line 10, after the period, insert "Employers may apply for approval of private plans that exceed the benefits provided to employees under this chapter."

 

Page 37, line 12, after "commissioner" insert ", in consultation with the commissioner of commerce,"

 

Page 38, line 9, after "commissioner" insert ", in consultation with the commissioner of commerce,"

 

Page 39, line 2, delete "medical" and insert "family" and delete "medical" and insert "family"

 

Page 39, after line 5, insert:

 

"Subd. 4.  Surety bond requirement.  If the private plan is in the form of self-insurance, the employer shall file with its application for private provision of the medical benefit or family benefit program a surety bond in an amount equal to the employer's annual premium that it would otherwise be required to pay to the family and medical benefit insurance account.  The surety bond must be in a form approved by the commissioner and issued by a surety company authorized to transact business in Minnesota.

 

Subd. 5.  Private plan requirements; timing of payment; intermittent leave increments; and weekly benefit determination.  (a) Private plan benefits under this section may be paid to align with the employer's payroll cycle or according to the terms of the approved private plan.

 

(b) Intermittent leave under a private plan may be taken in the minimum increment the employer offers to employees for other types of leave, not to exceed the eight-hour minimum increment under section 268B.04, subdivision 6.

 

(c) For purposes of determining the family and medical benefit amount and duration under a private plan, the weekly benefit amount and duration must be based on the employee's typical workweek and wages earned with the employer at the time of an application for benefits or over the past 52-week calendar year, whichever calculation results in the highest benefit amount for the employee.  If an employer does not have complete wage information for the full calendar year, the employer must accept an employee's certification of wage credits, based upon the employee's records."


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3745

Page 39, line 8, delete the third "product" and insert "product's policy form must be approved by the commissioner of commerce and issued by an insurance company authorized to transact insurance in this state."

 

Page 39, delete line 9

 

Page 39, line 25, delete "amended to conform" and insert "administered"

 

Page 39, after line 26, insert:

 

"Subd. 7.  Employer reimbursement.  If an employer meeting the requirements of a private plan through an insurance product under subdivision 6 has made advance payments of benefits due under this chapter or has made payments to an employee in like manner as wages during any period of family or medical leave for which the employee is entitled to the benefits provided by this chapter, the employer is entitled to be reimbursed by the carrier or third party administrator out of any benefits due or to become due for the family or medical leave, if the claim for reimbursement is filed with the carrier prior to payment of the benefits by the carrier."

 

Renumber the subdivisions in sequence and correct the internal references

 

Page 39, line 27, before "An" insert "(a)"

 

Page 39, line 28, delete everything before the comma and insert "application for private provision of the medical benefit or family benefit program" and after the period, insert "(b)"

 

Page 39, line 30, after the period, insert "An employee covered under a private plan has the right to request reconsideration of a decision under a private plan made by an insurer, private plan administrator, or employer prior to exercising appeal rights under section 268B.04."

 

Page 45, line 7, after "employer" insert ", except for an employer with an approved private plan under section 268B.10"

 

Page 45, line 15, after the first "employer" insert ", except for an employer with an approved private plan under section 268B.10,"

 

Page 46, line 2, delete everything after "employers" and insert "must pay a minimum of 50 percent"

 

Page 46, line 3, after "of" insert "the" and delete "from employee wages" and after the period, insert "Employees, through a deduction in their wages to the employer, must pay the remaining portion, if any, of the premium not paid by the employer."

 

Page 46, line 13, delete "employer"

 

Page 46, line 15, delete "employers participating in"

 

Page 46, line 16, delete "an employer participating in"

 

Page 46, line 18, delete "an employer participating in"

 

Page 46, line 20, after "and" insert "by July 31 of"

 

Page 52, line 13, delete "without" and insert "with"

 

Page 62, line 24, delete the second "and"


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3746

Page 62, after line 24, insert:

 

"(2) an explanation of the availability of family and medical leave benefits provided under this chapter for independent contractors; and"

 

Page 62, line 25, delete "(2)" and insert "(3)"

 

Page 63, line 15, delete everything before "prohibit" and insert "(2)"

 

Page 63, line 17, delete "under this chapter" and before the semicolon, insert "including through a supplemental benefit payment, as defined under section 268B.01, subdivision 41"

 

Page 63, line 18, delete "or"

 

Page 63, line 22, delete the period and insert "; or"

 

Page 63, after line 22, insert:

 

"(4) applied so as to create any power or duty in conflict with federal law."

 

Page 68, line 5, delete "January 1, 2024" and insert "July 1, 2025"

 

Page 68, after line 5, insert:

 

"ARTICLE 3

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACTUARIAL STUDY

 

Section 1.  ACTUARIAL STUDY REQUIREMENT.

 

(a) The commissioner of employment and economic development must contract with a qualified independent actuarial consultant to conduct an actuarial study of the family and medical leave premium rate, premium structure, weekly benefit formula, duration of benefit weeks, fund reserve, and other components as necessary to determine the financial soundness of the family and medical benefit insurance program created in this act.  A qualified independent actuarial consultant is one who is a Fellow of the Society of Actuaries, Member of the American Academy of Actuaries (FSA MAAA), and who has experience directly relevant to the analysis required under this paragraph.  The commissioner must issue a request for proposal to satisfy the requirements of this section no later than 30 days following enactment.

 

(b) A copy of the actuarial study must be provided to the majority and minority leaders in the senate and house of representatives no later than October 31, 2023."

 

Renumber the sections in sequence and correct the internal references

 

Amend the title as follows:

 

Page 1, line 2, delete everything after "to" and insert "employment; creating a family and medical benefit insurance program; requiring leave from employment under certain circumstances; allowing substitution of a private plan; prohibiting retaliation; classifying data; authorizing expedited rulemaking; appropriating money;"

 

Page 1, delete lines 3 to 4

 

Page 1, line 5, delete "money;"


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Correct the title numbers accordingly

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Workforce Development Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

      Pursuant to Joint Rule 2.03 and in accordance with Senate Concurrent Resolution No. 3, H. F. No. 2 was re‑referred to the Committee on Rules and Legislative Administration.

 

 

Olson, L., from the Committee on Ways and Means to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 2105, A bill for an act relating to state lands; modifying requirements for conveying easements; adding to state parks and state forest; authorizing sales of certain state lands; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 84.66, subdivision 7.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 13, after line 6, insert:

 

"Sec. 21.  LAND TRANSFER; CITY OF DULUTH.

 

Subdivision 1.  Acquisition.  (a) Notwithstanding the requirements or limitations in Minnesota Statutes, section 161.20, or any other law to the contrary, the commissioner of transportation may acquire, by deed or other means, the land described in paragraph (c) from the city of Duluth for the fair market value as determined by an appraisal of the property.

 

(b) The conveyance must be in a form approved by the attorney general.  The attorney general may make changes to the land description to correct errors and ensure accuracy.

 

(c) The land to be acquired is described as:

 

(1) the North 52 feet of Lots 41, 43, 45, and 47 on Glass Street (formerly Fourth Street) in Fond du Lac (part of parcel number 010-1620-00285); and

 

(2) those portions of Lots 49 and 51 on said Glass Street lying North of a straight line extending from a point on the west line of said Lot 49, distant 52 feet South measured along said west line from the northwest corner thereof, to a point on the east line of said Lot 51, distant 38.1 feet South measured along the east line of said Lot 51 from the northeast corner thereof, all in Fond du Lac (part of parcel number 010-1620-00285).

 

(d) The interests of the state and the city of Duluth would best be served if the land was purchased for fair market value by the commissioner of transportation in satisfaction of a State of Minnesota General Obligation Bond Financed Declaration under Minnesota Statutes, section 16A.695, and returned to the Fond du Lac Band of the Lake Superior Chippewa, also known as the Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, for the Mission Creek Cemetery.

 

Subd. 2.  Reconveyance.  (a) Upon acquiring the land described in subdivision 1, the commissioner of transportation must convey the land according to this subdivision.  Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 161.44, or any other law to the contrary, the commissioner of transportation must convey the land described in subdivision 1 for no consideration to the Fond du Lac Band of the Lake Superior Chippewa, also known as Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, for the public purpose of the Mission Creek Cemetery.


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(b) The conveyance must be in accordance with the state standard conveyance form and may incorporate the use restrictions contained in Term 1, paragraphs (a) and (b), of the current vesting deed."

 

Page 13, line 8, delete "20" and insert "21"

 

Renumber the sections in sequence

 

Amend the title as follows:

 

Page 1, line 3, after "sales" insert ", purchases, and transfers"

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Xiong from the Committee on Workforce Development Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 2233, A bill for an act relating to economic development; Department of Employment and Economic Development policy provisions; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 116J.552, subdivisions 4, 6; 116L.04, subdivision 1a; 116L.17, subdivision 1; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 116J.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Delete everything after the enacting clause and insert:

 

"ARTICLE 1

APPROPRIATIONS

 

      Section 1.  APPROPRIATIONS. 

 

(a) The sums shown in the columns marked "Appropriations" are appropriated to the agencies and for the purposes specified in this article.  The appropriations are from the general fund, or another named fund, and are available for the fiscal years indicated for each purpose.  The figures "2024" and "2025" used in this article mean that the appropriations listed under them are available for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2024, or June 30, 2025, respectively.  "The first year" is fiscal year 2024.  "The second year" is fiscal year 2025.  "The biennium" is fiscal years 2024 and 2025.

 

(b) If an appropriation in this article is enacted more than once in the 2023 regular or special legislative session, the appropriation must be given effect only once.

 

 

 

 

APPROPRIATIONS

 

 

 

Available for the Year

 

 

 

Ending June 30

 

 

 

2024

2025

 

      Sec. 2.  DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

 

 

 

 

      Subdivision 1.  Total Appropriation

 

$186,569,000

 

$176,469,000


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Appropriations by Fund

 

 

 

2024

 

2025

 

General

163,982,000

154,582,000

 

Workforce Development

22,587,000

21,887,000

 

 

The amounts that may be spent for each purpose are specified in the following subdivisions.

 

      Subd. 2.  Business and Community Development

 

12,500,000

 

12,500,000

 

(a)(1) $5,000,000 each year is for grants to local communities to increase the number of quality child care providers to support economic development.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available through June 30, 2025.  Fifty percent of grant money must go to communities located outside the seven-county metropolitan area as defined in Minnesota Statutes, section 473.121, subdivision 2.

 

(2) Grant recipients must obtain a 50 percent nonstate match to grant money in either cash or in-kind contribution, unless the commissioner waives the requirement.  Grant money available under this subdivision must be used to implement projects to reduce the child care shortage in the state, including but not limited to funding for child care business start-ups or expansion, training, facility modifications, direct subsidies or incentives to retain employees, or improvements required for licensing, and assistance with licensing and other regulatory requirements.  In awarding grants, the commissioner must give priority to communities that have demonstrated a shortage of child care providers.

 

(3) Within one year of receiving grant money, grant recipients must report to the commissioner on the outcomes of the grant program, including but not limited to the number of new providers, the number of additional child care provider jobs created, the number of additional child care slots, and the amount of cash and in-kind local money invested.  Within one month of all grant recipients reporting on program outcomes, the commissioner must report the grant recipients' outcomes to the chairs and ranking members of the legislative committees with jurisdiction over early learning and child care and economic development.

 

(b) $2,500,000 each year is for a grant to the Minnesota Initiative Foundations.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027.  The Minnesota Initiative Foundations must use grant money under this section to:

 

(1) facilitate planning processes for rural communities resulting in a community solution action plan that guides decision making to sustain and increase the supply of quality child care in the region to support economic development;


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(2) engage the private sector to invest local resources to support the community solution action plan and ensure quality child care is a vital component of additional regional economic development planning processes;

 

(3) provide locally based training and technical assistance to rural child care business owners individually or through a learning cohort.  Access to financial and business development assistance must prepare child care businesses for quality engagement and improvement by stabilizing operations, leveraging funding from other sources, and fostering business acumen that allows child care businesses to plan for and afford the cost of providing quality child care; and

 

(4) recruit child care programs to participate in quality rating and improvement measurement programs.  The Minnesota Initiative Foundations must work with local partners to provide low-cost training, professional development opportunities, and continuing education curricula.  The Minnesota Initiative Foundations must fund, through local partners, an enhanced level of coaching to rural child care providers to obtain a quality rating through measurement programs.

 

(c) $5,000,000 each year is for the community energy transition grant program under Minnesota Statutes, section 116J.55.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until expended.

 

      Subd. 3.  Employment and Training Programs

 

102,798,000

 

102,698,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

General

88,096,000

88,696,000

Workforce Development

14,702,000

14,002,000

 

(a) $500,000 each year from the general fund and $500,000 each year from the workforce development fund are for rural career counseling coordinators in the workforce service areas and for the purposes specified under Minnesota Statutes, section 116L.667.

 

(b) $750,000 each year is for the women and high-wage, high‑demand, nontraditional jobs grant program under Minnesota Statutes, section 116L.99.  Of this amount, up to five percent is for administration and monitoring of the program.

 

(c) $2,546,000 each year from the general fund and $4,604,000 each year from the workforce development fund are for the pathways to prosperity competitive grant program.  Of this amount, up to five percent is for administration and monitoring of the program.


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(d) $500,000 each year is from the workforce development fund for current Minnesota affiliates of OIC of America, Inc.  This appropriation shall be divided equally among the eligible centers.

 

(e) $1,000,000 each year is for competitive grants to organizations providing services to relieve economic disparities in the Southeast Asian community through workforce recruitment, development, job creation, assistance of smaller organizations to increase capacity, and outreach.  Of this amount, up to five percent is for administration and monitoring of the program.

 

(f) $1,000,000 each year is for a competitive grant program to provide grants to organizations that provide support services for individuals, such as job training, employment preparation, internships, job assistance to parents, financial literacy, academic and behavioral interventions for low-performing students, and youth intervention.  Grants made under this section must focus on low-income communities, young adults from families with a history of intergenerational poverty, and communities of color.  Of this amount, up to five percent is for administration and monitoring of the program.

 

(g) $1,750,000 each year is for a grant to Propel Nonprofits to provide capacity-building grants and related technical assistance to small, culturally specific organizations that primarily serve historically underserved cultural communities.  Propel Nonprofits may only award grants to nonprofit organizations that have an annual organizational budget of less than $1,000,000.  These grants may be used for:

 

(1) organizational infrastructure improvements, including developing database management systems and financial systems, or other administrative needs that increase the organization's ability to access new funding sources;

 

(2) organizational workforce development, including hiring culturally competent staff, training and skills development, and other methods of increasing staff capacity; or

 

(3) creating or expanding partnerships with existing organizations that have specialized expertise in order to increase capacity of the grantee organization to improve services to the community.

 

Of this amount, up to ten percent may be used by Propel Nonprofits for administrative costs.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(h) $5,230,000 each year from the general fund and $3,348,000 each year from the workforce development fund are for the youth‑at-work competitive grant program under Minnesota Statutes, section 116L.562.  Of this amount, up to five percent is


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3752

for administration and monitoring of the youth workforce development competitive grant program.  All grant awards shall be for two consecutive years.  Grants shall be awarded in the first year.  In fiscal year 2026 and beyond, the base amount from the general fund is $750,000. 

 

(i) $1,093,000 each year from the general fund and $1,000,000 each year from the workforce development fund are for the youthbuild program under Minnesota Statutes, sections 116L.361 to 116L.366.  In fiscal year 2026 and beyond, the base amount from the general fund is $0. 

 

(j) $4,427,000 each year from the general fund and $4,050,000 each year from the workforce development fund are for the Minnesota youth program under Minnesota Statutes, sections 116L.56 and 116L.561.  In fiscal year 2026 and beyond, the base amount from the general fund is $0.

 

(k) $1,000,000 each year is for a grant to the Minnesota Technology Association to support the SciTech Internship Program, a program that supports science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) internship opportunities for two‑ and four-year college students and graduate students in their fields of study.  The internship opportunities must match students with paid internships within STEM disciplines at small, for-profit companies located in Minnesota having fewer than 250 employees worldwide.  At least 250 students must be matched each year.  No more than 15 percent of the hires may be graduate students.  Selected hiring companies shall receive from the grant 50 percent of the wages paid to the intern, capped at $3,000 per intern.  The program must work toward increasing the participation among women or other underserved populations.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(l) $7,500,000 each year is for the Drive for Five Initiative to conduct outreach and provide job skills training, career counseling, case management, and supportive services for careers in (1) technology, (2) labor, (3) the caring professions, (4) manufacturing, and (5) educational and professional services.  These are onetime appropriations.

 

(m) Of the amounts appropriated in paragraph (l), the commissioner must make $5,000,000 each year available through a competitive request for proposal process.  The grant awards must be used to provide education and training in the five industries identified in paragraph (l).  Education and training may include:

 

(1) student tutoring and testing support services;

 

(2) training and employment placement in high wage and high growth employment;


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3753

(3) assistance in obtaining industry-specific certifications;

 

(4) remedial training leading to enrollment;

 

(5) real-time work experience in information;

 

(6) career and educational counseling;

 

(7) work experience and internships; and

 

(8) supportive services.

 

(n) Of the amount appropriated in paragraph (l), $1,625,000 each year must be awarded through competitive grants made to trade associations or chambers of commerce for job placement services.  Grant awards must be used to encourage workforce training efforts to ensure that efforts are aligned with employer demands and that graduates are connected with employers that are hiring.  Trade associations or chambers must partner with employers with current or anticipated employment opportunities and nonprofit workforce training partners participating in this program.  The trade associations or chambers must work closely with the industry sector training providers in the five industries identified in paragraph (l).  Grant awards may be used for:

 

(1) employer engagement strategies to align employment opportunities for individuals exiting workforce development training programs.  These strategies may include business recruitment, job opening development, employee recruitment, and job matching.  Trade associations must utilize the state's labor exchange system;

 

(2) diversity, inclusion, and retention training for members to increase the business understanding of welcoming and retaining a diverse workforce; and

 

(3) industry-specific training.

 

(o) Of the amount appropriated in paragraph (l), $875,000 each year is to hire, train, and deploy business services representatives in local workforce development areas throughout the state.  Business services representatives must work with an assigned local workforce development area to address the hiring needs of Minnesota's businesses by connecting job seekers and program participants in the CareerForce system.  Business services representatives serve in the classified service of the state and operate as part of the agency's Employment and Training Office.  The commissioner shall develop and implement training materials and reporting and evaluation procedures for the activities of the business services representatives.  The business services representatives must:


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3754

(1) serve as the primary contact for businesses in that area;

 

(2) actively engage employers by assisting with matching employers to job seekers by referring candidates, convening job fairs, and assisting with job announcements; and

 

(3) work with the local area board and the board's partners to identify candidates for openings in small and midsize companies in the local area.

 

(p) $30,000,000 each year is for the targeted population workforce grants under Minnesota Statutes, section 116L.43.  The department may use up to ten percent of this appropriation for administration, monitoring, and oversight of the program.  Of this amount:

 

(1) $22,000,000 each year is for job and entrepreneurial skills training grants under Minnesota Statutes, section 116L.43, subdivision 2;

 

(2) $2,000,000 each year is for diversity and inclusion training for small employers under Minnesota Statutes, section 116L.43, subdivision 3; and

 

(3) $6,000,000 each year is for capacity building grants under Minnesota Statutes, section 116L.43, subdivision 4.

 

Beginning in fiscal year 2026, the base amount is $2,500,000.

 

(q) $1,500,000 each year is to establish an Office of New Americans.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(r) $400,000 each year is for a grant to the nonprofit 30,000 Feet to fund youth apprenticeship jobs, wraparound services, after-school programming, and summer learning loss prevention targeted at African American youth.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(s) $700,000 each year is for a grant to Avivo to provide low‑income individuals with career education and job skills training that is fully integrated with chemical and mental health services.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(t)(1) $450,000 each year is for a grant to Better Futures Minnesota to provide job skills training to individuals who have been released from incarceration for a felony-level offense and are no more than 12 months from the date of release.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(2) Better Futures Minnesota shall annually report to the commissioner on how the money was spent and what results were achieved.  The report must include, at a minimum, information and data about the number of participants; participant homelessness, employment, recidivism, and child support compliance; and job skills training provided to program participants.


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3755

(u) $600,000 each year is for a grant to East Side Neighborhood Services.  This is a onetime appropriation of which:

 

(1) $300,000 each year is for the senior community service employment program, which provides work readiness training to low-income adults ages 55 and older to provide ongoing support and mentoring services to the program participants as well as the transition period from subsidized wages to unsubsidized wages; and

 

(2) $300,000 each year is for the nursing assistant plus program to serve the increased need for growth of medical talent pipelines through expansion of the existing program and development of in‑house training.

 

The amounts specified in clauses (1) and (2) may also be used to enhance employment programming for youth and young adults, ages 14 to 24, to introduce them to work culture, develop essential work readiness skills, and make career plans through paid internship experiences and work readiness training.

 

(v) $250,000 each year is for Minnesota Family Resiliency Partnership programs under Minnesota Statutes, section 116L.96.  The commissioner, through the adult career pathways program, shall distribute the money to existing nonprofit and state displaced homemaker programs.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(w) $550,000 each year is for a grant to the International Institute of Minnesota for workforce training for new Americans in industries in need of a trained workforce.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(x) $1,500,000 each year is for a grant to Summit Academy OIC to expand employment placement, GED preparation and administration, and STEM programming in the Twin Cities, Saint Cloud, and Bemidji.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(y) $500,000 each year is for a grant to Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Greater Twin Cities to provide disadvantaged youth ages 12 to 21 with job-seeking skills, connections to job training and education opportunities, and mentorship while exploring careers.  The grant must serve youth in the Big Brothers Big Sisters chapters in the Twin Cities, central Minnesota, and southern Minnesota.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(z) $400,000 each year is for a grant to the White Bear Center for the Arts for establishing a paid internship program for high school students to learn professional development skills through an arts perspective.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(aa) $750,000 each year is for a grant to Bridges to Healthcare to provide career education, wraparound support services, and job skills training in high-demand health care fields to low-income parents, nonnative speakers of English, and other hard-to-train


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3756

individuals, and to help families build secure pathways out of poverty and address worker shortages in one of Minnesota's most innovative industries.  Money may be used for program expenses, including but not limited to hiring instructors and navigators; space rental; and supportive services to help participants attend classes, including assistance with course fees, child care, transportation, and safe and stable housing.  Up to five percent of grant money may be used for Bridges to Healthcare's administrative costs.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(bb) $400,000 each year is for a grant to Hired to expand their career pathway job training and placement program that connects lower-skilled job seekers to entry-level and gateway jobs in high‑growth sectors.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(cc) $1,000,000 each year is for a grant to the Minnesota Alliance of Boys and Girls Clubs to administer a statewide project of youth job skills and career development.  This project, which may have career guidance components including health and life skills, must be designed to encourage, train, and assist youth in early access to education and job-seeking skills; work-based learning experience, including career pathways in STEM learning, career exploration, and matching; and first job placement through local community partnerships and on-site job opportunities.  This grant requires a 25 percent match from nonstate sources.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(dd) $300,000 each year is for a grant to Southeast Minnesota Workforce Development Area 8 and Workforce Development, Inc., to provide career planning, career pathway training and education, wraparound support services, and job skills advancement in high-demand careers to individuals with barriers to employment in Steele County, and to help families build secure pathways out of poverty and address worker shortages in the Owatonna and Steele County area, as well as supporting Employer Outreach Services that provide solutions to workforce challenges and direct connections to workforce programming.  Money may be used for program expenses, including but not limited to hiring instructors and navigators; space rental; and supportive services to help participants attend classes, including assistance with course fees, child care, transportation, and safe and stable housing.  Up to five percent of grant money may be used for Workforce Development, Inc.'s administrative costs.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2025.

 

(ee) $1,250,000 each year is for a grant to Ujamaa Place to assist primarily African American men with job training, employment preparation, internships, education, vocational housing, and organizational capacity building.  This is a onetime appropriation.


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(ff) $500,000 each year is for grants to Minnesota Diversified Industries, Inc., to provide inclusive employment opportunities and services for people with disabilities.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(gg) $1,000,000 each year is for performance grants under Minnesota Statutes, section 116J.8747, to Twin Cities R!SE to provide training to individuals facing barriers to employment.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026.

 

(hh) $500,000 each year is for the getting to work grant program under Minnesota Statutes, section 116J.545.  Of this amount, up to five percent is for administration and monitoring of the program.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(ii) $400,000 the first year is for a grant to the ProStart and Hospitality Tourism Management Program for a well-established, proven, and successful education program that helps young people advance careers in the hospitality industry and addresses critical long-term workforce shortages in the tourism industry.

 

(jj) $1,500,000 each year is for a grant to Comunidades Latinas Unidas En Servicio-Latino Communities United in Service (CLUES) to address employment, economic, and technology access disparities for low-income, unemployed, or underemployed individuals.  Money must be used to support short-term certifications and transferable skills in high-demand fields, workforce readiness, customized financial capability, and employment supports.  At least 50 percent of this amount must be used for programming targeted at greater Minnesota.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(kk) $500,000 each year is for a grant to the American Indian Opportunities and Industrialization Center for workforce development programming, including reducing academic disparities for American Indian students and adults.  This is a onetime appropriation. 

 

(ll) $300,000 each year is for a grant to YMCA of the North to provide career exploration, job training, and workforce development services for underserved youth and young adults.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(mm) $750,000 each year is for grants to the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board's Teen Teamworks youth employment and training programs.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available in either year of the biennium and is available until spent.

 

(nn) $700,000 each year is for grants to support competitive robotics teams that prepare youth for careers in STEM fields, by creating internships for high school students to work at private companies in STEM fields, including the payment of student stipends.  This is a onetime appropriation.


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(oo) $1,000,000 in the first year and $2,000,000 in the second year are for a clean economy equitable workforce grant program.  Money must be used for grants to support partnership development, planning, and implementation of workforce readiness programs aimed at workers who are Black, Indigenous, and People of Color.  Programs may include workforce training, career development, workers' rights training, employment placement, and culturally appropriate job readiness and must prepare workers for careers in the high-demand fields of construction, clean energy, and energy efficiency.  Grants must be given to nonprofit organizations that serve historically disenfranchised communities, including new Americans, with preference for organizations that are new providers of workforce programming or which have partnership agreements with registered apprenticeship programs.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(pp) $500,000 each year is for a grant to Emerge Community Development to support and reinforce critical workforce training at the Emerge Career and Technical Center, Cedar-Riverside Opportunity Center, and Emerge Second Chance programs in Minneapolis.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(qq) $500,000 each year is for a grant to Project for Pride in Living to provide job training and workforce development services for underserved communities.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(rr) $500,000 each year is for a grant to Pillsbury United Communities to provide job training and workforce development services for underserved communities.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(ss) $1,000,000 each year is for a grant to the Redemption Project to provide employment services to adults leaving incarceration, including recruiting, educating, training, and retaining employment mentors and partners.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(tt) $350,000 each year is for a grant to the YWCA of Minneapolis to provide training to eligible individuals, including job skills training, career counseling, and job placement assistance necessary to secure a child development associate credential and to have a career path in early childhood education.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(uu) $500,000 each year is for a grant to Greater Twin Cities United Way to make grants to partner organizations to provide workforce training using the career pathways model that helps students gain work experience, earn experience in high-demand fields, and transition into family-sustaining careers.  This is a onetime appropriation.


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(vv) $1,500,000 each year is for a grant to the nonprofit Sanneh Foundation to fund out-of-school summer programs focused on mentoring and behavioral, social, and emotional learning interventions and enrichment activities directed toward low‑income students of color.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until spent.

 

(ww) $3,000,000 each year is for a grant to Youthprise to provide economic development services designed to enhance long-term economic self-sufficiency in communities with concentrated African populations statewide.  Of these amounts, 50 percent is for subgrants to Ka Joog and 50 percent is for competitive subgrants to community organizations.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(xx) $1,000,000 each year is for performance grants under Minnesota Statutes, section 116J.8747, to Goodwill-Easter Seals Minnesota and its partners.  The grant shall be used to continue the FATHER Project in Rochester, St. Cloud, St. Paul, Minneapolis, and the surrounding areas to assist fathers in overcoming barriers that prevent fathers from supporting their children economically and emotionally, including with community re-entry following confinement.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(yy) $1,000,000 each year is for a grant to the Hmong American Partnership to expand job training and placement programs primarily serving the Southeast Asian community.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(zz) $400,000 each year is for a grant to Project Restore Minnesota for the Social Kitchen project, a pathway program for careers in the culinary arts.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(aaa) $1,000,000 each year is for competitive grants to organizations providing services to relieve economic disparities in the African immigrant community through workforce recruitment, development, job creation, assistance of smaller organizations to increase capacity, and outreach.  Of this amount, up to five percent is for administration and monitoring of the program.  Beginning in fiscal year 2026, the base amount is $200,000.

 

(bbb) $500,000 each year is for a grant to the Hmong Chamber of Commerce to train ethnically Southeast Asian business owners and operators in better business practices.  Of this amount, up to $5,000 may be used for administrative costs.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(ccc) $250,000 each year is for a grant to the Center for Economic Inclusion for a strategic intervention program designed to target and connect program participants to meaningful, sustainable living-wage employment.  This is a onetime appropriation.


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(ddd) $100,000 each year is for grants to the Minnesota Grocers Association Foundation for Carts to Careers, a statewide initiative to promote careers, conduct outreach, provide job skills training, and award scholarships for students pursuing careers in the food industry.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(eee) $500,000 each year is for a grant to Minnesota Independence College and Community to provide employment preparation, job placement, job retention, and service coordination services to adults with autism and learning differences.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(fff) $500,000 each year is for a grant to Ramsey County to provide job training and workforce development for underserved communities.  Grant money may be subgranted to Milestone Community Development for the Milestone Tech program.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(ggg) $500,000 each year is for a grant to Ramsey County for a technology training pathway program focused on intergenerational community tech work for residents who are at least 18 years old and no more than 24 years old and who live in a census tract that has a poverty rate of at least 20 percent as reported in the most recently completed decennial census published by the United States Bureau of the Census.  Grant money may be used for program administration, training, training stipends, wages, and support services.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(hhh) $700,000 in the first year is from the workforce development fund for a grant to the Southwest Initiative Foundation for the southwestern Minnesota workforce development scholarship pilot program.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2028.

 

      Subd. 4.  General Support Services

 

17,505,000

 

7,505,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

General Fund

17,450,000

7,450,000

Workforce Development

55,000

55,000

 

(a) $1,269,000 each year is for transfer to the Minnesota Housing Finance Agency for operating the Olmstead Compliance Office.

 

(b) $10,000,000 in the first year is for the workforce digital transformation projects.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027.

 

      Subd. 5.  Vocational Rehabilitation

 

42,341,000

 

42,341,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

General

34,511,000

34,511,000

Workforce Development

7,830,000

7,830,000


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(a) $14,300,000 each year is for the state's vocational rehabilitation program under Minnesota Statutes, chapter 268A.

 

(b) $11,495,000 each year from the general fund and $6,830,000 each year from the workforce development fund are for extended employment services for persons with severe disabilities under Minnesota Statutes, section 268A.15.  Of the amounts appropriated from the general fund, $4,500,000 each year is for new rate increases and maintaining prior rate increases to providers of extended employment services.

 

(c) $4,805,000 each year is for grants to programs that provide employment support services to persons with mental illness under Minnesota Statutes, sections 268A.13 and 268A.14.  Beginning in fiscal year 2026, the base amount is $2,555,000.

 

(d) $3,911,000 each year is for grants to centers for independent living under Minnesota Statutes, section 268A.11.  Beginning in fiscal year 2026, the base amount is $3,011,000.

 

(e) $1,000,000 each year is from the workforce development fund for grants under Minnesota Statutes, section 268A.16, for employment services for persons, including transition-age youth, who are deaf, deafblind, or hard-of-hearing.  If the amount in the first year is insufficient, the amount in the second year is available in the first year.

 

      Subd. 6.  Services for the Blind

 

11,425,000

 

11,425,000

 

(a) $500,000 each year is for senior citizens who are becoming blind.  At least one-half of the money for this purpose must be used to provide training services for seniors who are becoming blind.  Training services must provide independent living skills to seniors who are becoming blind to allow them to continue to live independently in their homes.

 

(b) $2,500,000 each year is for the employer reasonable accommodation fund.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

      Sec. 3.  DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

 

$3,500,000

 

$3,500,000

 

(a) $2,250,000 each year is for contracts with Minnesota's institutions of higher education to provide instruction to incarcerated individuals in state correctional facilities and to support partnerships with public and private employers, trades programs, and community colleges in providing employment opportunities for individuals after incarceration.  Funding must be used for contracts with institutions of higher education and other training providers and associated re-entry and operational support services provided by the agency.  Beginning in fiscal year 2026, the base amount is $200,000.


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(b) $1,250,000 each year is to expand the use of the existing work release program at the Department of Corrections to increase the availability of educational programming for incarcerated individuals who are eligible and approved for work release.  Beginning in fiscal year 2026, the base amount is $100,000.

 

ARTICLE 2

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

 

Section 1.  [116J.545] GETTING TO WORK GRANT PROGRAM.

 

Subdivision 1.  Creation.  The commissioner of employment and economic development shall make grants to nonprofit organizations to establish and operate programs under this section that provide, repair, or maintain motor vehicles to assist eligible individuals to obtain or maintain employment.  All grants shall be for two years.

 

Subd. 2.  Qualified grantee.  A grantee must:

 

(1) qualify under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code; and

 

(2) at the time of application, offer or have the demonstrated capacity to offer a motor vehicle program that provides the services required under subdivision 3.

 

Subd. 3.  Program requirements.  (a) A program must offer one or more of the following services:

 

(1) provision of new or used motor vehicles by gift, sale, or lease;

 

(2) motor vehicle repair and maintenance services; or

 

(3) motor vehicle loans.

 

(b) In addition to the requirements of paragraph (a), a program must offer one or more of the following services:

 

(1) financial literacy education;

 

(2) education on budgeting for vehicle ownership;

 

(3) car maintenance and repair instruction;

 

(4) credit counseling; or

 

(5) job training related to motor vehicle maintenance and repair.

 

Subd. 4.  Application.  Applications for a grant must be on a form provided by the commissioner and on a schedule set by the commissioner.  Applications must, in addition to any other information required by the commissioner, include the following:

 

(1) a detailed description of all services to be offered;

 

(2) the area to be served;

 

(3) the estimated number of program participants to be served by the grant; and


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(4) a plan for leveraging resources from partners that may include but are not limited to:

 

(i) automobile dealers;

 

(ii) automobile parts dealers;

 

(iii) independent local mechanics and automobile repair facilities;

 

(iv) banks and credit unions;

 

(v) employers;

 

(vi) employment and training agencies;

 

(vii) insurance companies and agents;

 

(viii) local workforce centers; and

 

(ix) educational institutions, including vocational institutions and jobs or skills training programs.

 

Subd. 5.  Participant eligibility.  (a) To be eligible to receive program services, a person must:

 

(1) have a household income at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty level;

 

(2) be at least 18 years of age;

 

(3) have a valid driver's license;

 

(4) provide the grantee with proof of motor vehicle insurance; and

 

(5) demonstrate to the grantee that a motor vehicle is required by the person to obtain or maintain employment.

 

(b) This subdivision does not preclude a grantee from imposing additional requirements, not inconsistent with paragraph (a), for the receipt of program services.

 

Subd. 6.  Report to legislature.  By January 15, 2026, and each January 15 in an even-numbered year thereafter, the commissioner shall submit a report to the chairs of the house of representatives and senate committees with jurisdiction over workforce and economic development on program outcomes.  At a minimum, the report must include:

 

(1) the total number of program participants;

 

(2) the number of program participants who received each of the following:

 

(i) provision of a motor vehicle;

 

(ii) motor vehicle repair services; and

 

(iii) motor vehicle loans;

 

(3) the number of program participants who report that they or their children were able to increase their participation in community activities such as after school programs, other youth programs, church or civic groups, or library services as a result of participation in the program; and


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(4) an analysis of the impact of the getting to work grant program on the employment rate and wages of program participants.

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116J.5492, subdivision 8, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 8.  Meetings.  The advisory committee must meet monthly until the energy transition plan is submitted quarterly and submit an updated energy transition plan annually to the governor and the legislature.  Once submitted, the committee shall develop a regular meeting schedule as needed.  The chair may call additional meetings as necessary.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116J.5492, subdivision 10, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 10.  Expiration.  This section expires the day after the Minnesota energy transition plan required under section 116J.5493 is submitted to the legislature and the governor on June 30, 2027.

 

Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116J.55, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Definitions.  For the purposes of this section, "eligible community" means a county, municipality, or tribal government located in Minnesota in which an electric generating plant owned by a public utility, as defined in section 216B.02, that is powered by coal, nuclear energy, or natural gas:

 

(1) is currently operating and (i) is scheduled to cease operations or, (ii) whose cessation of operations has been proposed in an integrated resource plan filed with the commission under section 216B.2422, or (iii) whose current operating license expires within 15 years of the effective date of this section; or

 

(2) ceased operations or was removed from the local property tax base no earlier than five years before the date an application is made for a grant under this section.

 

Sec. 5.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116J.55, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Grant awards; limitations.  (a) The commissioner must award grants under this section to eligible communities through a competitive grant process.

 

(b) (a) A grant awarded to an eligible community under this section must not exceed $500,000 $1,000,000 in any calendar year.  The commissioner may accept grant applications on an ongoing or rolling basis.

 

(c) (b) Grants funded with revenues from the renewable development account established in section 116C.779 must be awarded to an eligible community located within the retail electric service territory of the public utility that is subject to section 116C.779 or to an eligible community in which an electric generating plant owned by that public utility is located.

 

Sec. 6.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116J.55, subdivision 6, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 6.  Eligible expenditures.  (a) Money in the account established in subdivision 3 must be used only to:

 

(1) award grants to eligible communities under this section; and

 

(2) reimburse the department's reasonable costs to administer this section, up to a maximum of five percent of the appropriation made to the commissioner under this section.  The commissioner may transfer part of the allowable administrative portion of this appropriation to the Environmental Quality Board to assist communities with regulatory coordination and dedicated technical assistance on conversion for these communities.


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(b) An eligible community awarded a grant under this section may use the grant to plan for or address the economic and social impacts on the eligible community of the electric generating plant's cessation of operations, including but not limited to land use studies, economic planning, researching, planning, and implementing activities, capital costs of public infrastructure necessary for economic development, and impact studies and other planning activities enabling communities to become shovel-ready and support the transition from power plants to other economic activities to minimize the negative impacts of power plant closures on tax revenues and jobs designed to:

 

(1) assist workers at the plant find new employment, including worker retraining and developing small business start-up skills;

 

(2) increase the eligible community's property tax base; and

 

(3) develop alternative economic development strategies to attract new employers to the eligible community.

 

Sec. 7.  [116J.659] OFFICE OF NEW AMERICANS.

 

Subdivision 1.  Office established; purpose.  (a) The Office of New Americans is established within the Department of Employment and Economic Development.  The governor must appoint an assistant commissioner who serves in the unclassified service.  The assistant commissioner must hire a program manager and an office assistant, as well as any staff necessary to carry out the office's duties under subdivision 2.

 

(b) The purpose of the office is to serve immigrants and refugees in Minnesota by:

 

(1) addressing challenges that face immigrants and refugees in Minnesota, and creating access in economic development and workforce programs and services; and

 

(2) providing interstate agency coordination, policy reviews, and guidance that assist in creating access to immigrants and refugees.

 

Subd. 2.  Duties.  (a) The office has the duty to:

 

(1) create and implement a statewide strategy to support immigrant and refugee integration into Minnesota communities;

 

(2) address the state's workforce needs by connecting employers and job seekers within the immigrant and refugee community;

 

(3) identify strategies to reduce employment barriers, including the creation of alternative pathways for immigrants and refugees;

 

(4) support programs and activities designed to ensure equitable access to the workforce for immigrants and refugees, including those who are disabled;

 

(5) support equitable opportunities for immigrants and refugees to access state government services and grants;

 

(6) work with state agencies and community and foundation partners to undertake studies and research and analyze economic and demographic trends to better understand and serve the state's immigrant and refugee communities;

 

(7) coordinate and establish best practices for language access initiatives to all state agencies;

 

(8) convene stakeholders and provide assistance and recommendations to the governor on issues impacting immigrants and refugees;


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(9) make policy recommendations to the governor on issues impacting immigrants and refugees;

 

(10) develop systems of communication and collaboration with local offices and service providers to ensure that immigrants and refugees can access support available to them to address multisectoral barriers to success, including in the areas of employment, housing, legal services, health care, and education;

 

(11) collaborate with existing immigrant and refugee inclusion positions and offices at the city and county level statewide;

 

(12) encourage and support the creation of new immigrant and refugee inclusion positions and offices at the city and county level statewide;

 

(13) serve as the point of contact for immigrants and refugees accessing resources both within the department and with boards charged with oversight of a profession;

 

(14) promulgate rules necessary to implement and effectuate this section;

 

(15) provide an annual report, as required by subdivision 3; and

 

(16) perform any other activities consistent with the office's purpose.

 

Subd. 3.  Reporting.  (a) Beginning January 15, 2024, and each year thereafter, the Office of New Americans shall report to the legislative committees with jurisdiction over the office's activities during the previous year.

 

(b) The report shall contain, at a minimum:

 

(1) a summary of the office's activities;

 

(2) suggested policies, incentives, and legislation designed to accelerate the achievement of the duties under subdivision 2;

 

(3) any proposed legislative and policy initiatives;

 

(4) the amount and types of grants awarded under subdivision 6; and

 

(5) any other information deemed necessary and requested by the legislative committees with jurisdiction over the office.

 

(c) The report may be submitted electronically and is subject to section 3.195, subdivision 1.

 

Subd. 4.  Interdepartmental Coordinating Council on Immigrant and Refugee Affairs.  (a) An interdepartmental Coordinating Council on Immigrant and Refugee Affairs is established to advise the Office of New Americans.

 

(b) The purpose of the council is to identify and establish ways in which state departments and agencies can work together to deliver state programs and services effectively and efficiently to Minnesota's immigrant and refugee populations.  The council shall implement policies, procedures, and programs requested by the governor through the state departments and offices.


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(c) The council shall be chaired by the assistant commissioner of the Office of New Americans and shall be comprised of the commissioners, department directors, or senior leadership designees, from the following state departments and offices:

 

(1) the governor's office;

 

(2) the Department of Administration;

 

(3) the Department of Employment and Economic Development;

 

(4) the Department of Human Services;

 

(5) the Department of Human Services Resettlement Program Office;

 

(6) the Department of Labor and Industry;

 

(7) the Department of Health;

 

(8) the Department of Education;

 

(9) the Office of Higher Education;

 

(10) the Department of Public Safety;

 

(11) the Department of Corrections;

 

(12) the Council for Minnesotans of African Heritage;

 

(13) the Minnesota Council on Latino Affairs; and

 

(14) the Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans.

 

(d) Each department or office serving as a member of the council shall designate one staff member as an immigrant and refugee services liaison.  The liaisons' responsibilities shall include:

 

(1) preparation and dissemination of information and services available to immigrants and refugees; and

 

(2) interfacing with the Office of New Americans on issues that impact immigrants and refugees and their communities.

 

Subd. 5.  No right of action.  Nothing in this section shall be construed to create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the state; its departments, agencies, or entities; its officers, employees, or agents; or any other person.

 

Subd. 6.  Grants.  The office may apply for grants for interested state agencies, community partners, and stakeholders under this section to carry out the duties under subdivision 2.  In awarding grants, the commissioner must allocate grants as evenly as practicable among interested parties.

 

Sec. 8.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116L.361, subdivision 7, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 7.  Very Low income.  "Very Low income" means incomes that are at or less than 50 80 percent of the area median income, adjusted for family size, as estimated by the Department of Housing and Urban Development.


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Sec. 9.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116L.362, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Generally.  (a) The commissioner shall make grants to eligible organizations for programs to provide education and training services to targeted youth.  The purpose of these programs is to provide specialized training and work experience for targeted youth who have not been served effectively by the current educational system.  The programs are to include a work experience component with work projects that result in the rehabilitation, improvement, or construction of (1) residential units for the homeless; (2) improvements to the energy efficiency and environmental health of residential units and other green jobs purposes; (3) facilities to support community garden projects; or (4) education, social service, or health facilities which are owned by a public agency or a private nonprofit organization.

 

(b) Eligible facilities must principally provide services to homeless or very low income individuals and families, and include the following:

 

(1) Head Start or day care centers, including playhouses or similar incidental structures;

 

(2) homeless, battered women, or other shelters;

 

(3) transitional housing and tiny houses;

 

(4) youth or senior citizen centers;

 

(5) community health centers; and

 

(6) community garden facilities.

 

Two or more eligible organizations may jointly apply for a grant.  The commissioner shall administer the grant program.

 

Sec. 10.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116L.364, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Work experience component.  A work experience component must be included in each program.  The work experience component must provide vocational skills training in an industry where there is a viable expectation of job opportunities.  A training subsidy, living allowance, or stipend, not to exceed an amount equal to 100 percent of the poverty line for a family of two as defined in United States Code, title 42, section 673, paragraph (2) the final rules and regulations of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, may be provided to program participants.  The wage or stipend must be provided to participants who are recipients of public assistance in a manner or amount which will not reduce public assistance benefits.  The work experience component must be designed so that work projects result in (1) the expansion or improvement of residential units for homeless persons and very low income families; (2) improvements to the energy efficiency and environmental health of residential units; (3) facilities to support community garden projects; or (4) rehabilitation, improvement, or construction of eligible education, social service, or health facilities that principally serve homeless or very low income individuals and families.  Any work project must include direct supervision by individuals skilled in each specific vocation.  Program participants may earn credits toward the completion of their secondary education from their participation in the work experience component.

 

Sec. 11.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116L.365, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Priority for housing.  Any residential or transitional housing units that become available through a work project that is part of the program described in section 116L.364 must be allocated in the following order:

 

(1) homeless targeted youth who have participated in constructing, rehabilitating, or improving the unit;

 

(2) homeless families with at least one dependent;


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(3) other homeless individuals;

 

(4) other very low income families and individuals; and

 

(5) families or individuals that receive public assistance and that do not qualify in any other priority group.

 

Sec. 12.  [116L.43] TARGETED POPULATIONS WORKFORCE GRANTS.

 

Subdivision 1.  Definitions.  (a) For the purposes of this section, the following terms have the meanings given. 

 

(b) "Community-based organization" means a nonprofit organization that:

 

(1) provides workforce development programming or services;

 

(2) has an annual organizational budget of no more than $1,000,000;

 

(3) has its primary office located in a historically underserved community of color or low-income community; and

 

(4) serves a population that generally reflects the demographics of that local community.

 

(c) "Entry level jobs" means part-time or full-time jobs that an individual can perform without any prior education or experience.

 

(d) "High wage" means the income needed for a family to cover minimum necessary expenses in a given geographic area, including food, child care, health care, housing, and transportation. 

 

(e) "Industry specific certification" means a credential an individual can earn to show proficiency in a particular area or skill.

 

(f) "Remedial training" means additional training provided to staff following the identification of a need and intended to increase proficiency in performing job tasks.

 

(g) "Small business" has the same meaning as section 645.445.

 

Subd. 2.  Job and entrepreneurial skills training grants.  (a) The commissioner shall establish a job and entrepreneurial skills training grant program that must provide competitive funding to community-based organizations to provide skills training that leads to employment or business development in high-growth industries.

 

(b) Eligible forms of skills training include:

 

(1) student tutoring and testing support services;

 

(2) training and employment placement in high-wage and high-growth employment;

 

(3) assistance in obtaining industry specific certifications;

 

(4) remedial training leading to enrollment in further training or education;

 

(5) real-time work experience or on-the-job training;

 

(6) career and educational counseling;

 

(7) work experience and internships;


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(8) supportive services;

 

(9) tuition reimbursement for new entrants into public sector careers;

 

(10) career mentorship;

 

(11) postprogram case management services;

 

(12) job placement services; and

 

(13) the cost of corporate board of director training for people of color.

 

(c) Grant awards must not exceed $750,000 per year per organization and all funding awards must be made for the duration of a biennium.  An organization may partner with another organization to utilize grant awards, provided that the organizations must not be funded to deliver the same services.  Grants awarded under this subdivision are not subject to section 116L.98.

 

Subd. 3.  Diversity and inclusion training for small employers.  (a) The commissioner shall establish a diversity and inclusion training grant program which shall provide competitive grants to small businesses for diversity and inclusion training, including the creation and implementation of a plan to actively engage, hire, and retain people of color for both entry level and high-wage opportunities, including management and board of director positions.

 

(b) Grant awards must not exceed $300,000 per year per business.  A business may only receive one grant for diversity and inclusion training per biennium.

 

(c) Applicants are required to submit a plan for use of the funds.  Grant recipients are required to submit a diversity and inclusion implementation plan after training is completed.

 

(d) Grants awarded under this subdivision are not subject to section 116L.98.

 

(e) Sections 116J.993 to 116J.995 do not apply to assistance under this subdivision.

 

Subd. 4.  Capacity building.  (a) The commissioner shall establish a capacity building grant program to provide training services and funding for capacity building to community-based organizations.

 

(b) Eligible uses of grant awards include covering the cost of workforce program delivery staff, program infrastructure costs, and workforce training related service model development.

 

(c) Grant awards must not exceed $50,000 per organization and are limited to one grant per community-based organization.

 

(d) Grants awarded under this subdivision are not subject to section 116L.98. 

 

(e) Grant recipients must submit a report to the commissioner outlining the use of grant funds and the impact of that funding on the community-based organization's future ability to provide workforce development services.

 

Sec. 13.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116L.56, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Eligible applicant.  "Eligible applicant" means an individual who is between the ages of 14 and 21 24 and economically disadvantaged.


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An at-risk youth who is classified as a family of one is deemed economically disadvantaged.  For purposes of eligibility determination the following individuals are considered at risk:

 

(1) a pregnant or parenting youth;

 

(2) a youth with limited English proficiency;

 

(3) a potential or actual school dropout;

 

(4) a youth in an offender or diversion program;

 

(5) a public assistance recipient or a recipient of group home services;

 

(6) a youth with disabilities including learning disabilities;

 

(7) a child of drug or alcohol abusers or a youth with substance use disorder;

 

(8) a homeless or runaway youth;

 

(9) a youth with basic skills deficiency;

 

(10) a youth with an educational attainment of one or more levels below grade level appropriate to age; or

 

(11) a foster child.

 

Sec. 14.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116L.561, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Allocation formula.  Seventy percent of Minnesota youth program funds must be allocated based on the county's share of economically disadvantaged youth.  The remaining 30 percent must be allocated based on the county's share of population ages 14 to 21 24.

 

Sec. 15.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 116L.562, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Definitions.  For purposes of this section:

 

(1) "eligible organization" or "eligible applicant" means a local government unit, nonprofit organization, community action agency, or a public school district;

 

(2) "at-risk youth" means youth classified as at-risk under section 116L.56, subdivision 2; and

 

(3) "economically disadvantaged" means youth who are economically disadvantaged as defined in United States Code, title 29, section 1503 the rules and regulations of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.

 

Sec. 16.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 268.035, subdivision 20, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 20.  Noncovered employment.  "Noncovered employment" means:

 

(1) employment for the United States government or an instrumentality thereof, including military service;

 

(2) employment for a state, other than Minnesota, or a political subdivision or instrumentality thereof;

 

(3) employment for a foreign government;

 

(4) employment covered under the federal Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act;


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(5) employment for a church or convention or association of churches, or a nonprofit organization operated primarily for religious purposes that is operated, supervised, controlled, or principally supported by a church or convention or association of churches;

 

(6) employment for an elementary or secondary school with a curriculum that includes religious education that is operated by a church, a convention or association of churches, or a nonprofit organization that is operated, supervised, controlled, or principally supported by a church or convention or association of churches;

 

(7) employment for Minnesota or a political subdivision, or a nonprofit organization, of a duly ordained or licensed minister of a church in the exercise of a ministry or by a member of a religious order in the exercise of duties required by the order;

 

(8) employment for Minnesota or a political subdivision, or a nonprofit organization, of an individual receiving rehabilitation of "sheltered" work in a facility conducted for the purpose of carrying out a program of rehabilitation for individuals whose earning capacity is impaired by age or physical or mental deficiency or injury or a program providing "sheltered" work for individuals who because of an impaired physical or mental capacity cannot be readily absorbed in the competitive labor market.  This clause applies only to services performed in a facility certified by the Rehabilitation Services Branch of the department or in a day training or habilitation program licensed by the Department of Human Services;

 

(9) employment for Minnesota or a political subdivision, or a nonprofit organization, of an individual receiving work relief or work training as part of an unemployment work relief or work training program financed in whole or in part by any federal agency or an agency of a state or political subdivision thereof.  This clause does not apply to programs that require unemployment benefit coverage for the participants;

 

(10) employment for Minnesota or a political subdivision, as an elected official, a member of a legislative body, or a member of the judiciary;

 

(11) employment as a member of the Minnesota National Guard or Air National Guard;

 

(12) employment for Minnesota or a political subdivision, or instrumentality thereof, of an individual serving on a temporary basis in case of fire, flood, tornado, or similar emergency;

 

(13) employment as an election official or election worker for Minnesota or a political subdivision, if the compensation for that employment was less than $1,000 in a calendar year;

 

(14) employment for Minnesota that is a major policy-making or advisory position in the unclassified service;

 

(15) employment for Minnesota in an unclassified position established under section 43A.08, subdivision 1a;

 

(16) employment for a political subdivision of Minnesota that is a nontenured major policy making or advisory position;

 

(17) domestic employment in a private household, local college club, or local chapter of a college fraternity or sorority, if the wages paid in any calendar quarter in either the current or prior calendar year to all individuals in domestic employment totaled less than $1,000.

 

"Domestic employment" includes all service in the operation and maintenance of a private household, for a local college club, or local chapter of a college fraternity or sorority as distinguished from service as an employee in the pursuit of an employer's trade or business;

 

(18) employment of an individual by a son, daughter, or spouse, and employment of a child under the age of 18 by the child's father or mother;


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(19) employment of an inmate of a custodial or penal institution;

 

(20) employment for a school, college, or university, by a student who is enrolled and whose primary relation to the school, college, or university is as a student.  This does not include an individual whose primary relation to the school, college, or university is as an employee who also takes courses;

 

(21) employment of an individual who is enrolled as a student in a full-time program at a nonprofit or public educational institution that maintains a regular faculty and curriculum and has a regularly organized body of students in attendance at the place where its educational activities are carried on, taken for credit at the institution, that combines academic instruction with work experience, if the employment is an integral part of the program, and the institution has so certified to the employer, except that this clause does not apply to employment in a program established for or on behalf of an employer or group of employers;

 

(22) employment of a foreign college or university student who works on a seasonal or temporary basis under the J-1 visa summer work travel program described in Code of Federal Regulations, title 22, section 62.32;

 

(23) employment of university, college, or professional school students in an internship or other training program with the city of St. Paul or the city of Minneapolis under Laws 1990, chapter 570, article 6, section 3;

 

(24) employment for a hospital by a patient of the hospital.  "Hospital" means an institution that has been licensed by the Department of Health as a hospital;

 

(25) employment as a student nurse for a hospital or a nurses' training school by an individual who is enrolled and is regularly attending classes in an accredited nurses' training school;

 

(26) employment as an intern for a hospital by an individual who has completed a four-year course in an accredited medical school;

 

(27) employment as an insurance salesperson, by other than a corporate officer, if all the wages from the employment is solely by way of commission.  The word "insurance" includes an annuity and an optional annuity;

 

(28) employment as an officer of a township mutual insurance company or farmer's mutual insurance company under chapter 67A;

 

(29) employment of a corporate officer, if the officer directly or indirectly, including through a subsidiary or holding company, owns 25 percent or more of the employer corporation, and employment of a member of a limited liability company, if the member directly or indirectly, including through a subsidiary or holding company, owns 25 percent or more of the employer limited liability company;

 

(30) employment as a real estate salesperson, other than a corporate officer, if all the wages from the employment is solely by way of commission;

 

(31) employment as a direct seller as defined in United States Code, title 26, section 3508;

 

(32) employment of an individual under the age of 18 in the delivery or distribution of newspapers or shopping news, not including delivery or distribution to any point for subsequent delivery or distribution;

 

(33) casual employment performed for an individual, other than domestic employment under clause (17), that does not promote or advance that employer's trade or business;

 

(34) employment in "agricultural employment" unless it is "covered agricultural employment" under subdivision 11; or


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(35) if employment during one-half or more of any pay period was covered employment, all the employment for the pay period is covered employment; but if during more than one-half of any pay period the employment was noncovered employment, then all of the employment for the pay period is noncovered employment.  "Pay period" means a period of not more than a calendar month for which a payment or compensation is ordinarily made to the employee by the employer.; or

 

(36) employment of a foreign agricultural worker who works on a seasonal or temporary basis under the H-2A visa temporary agricultural employment program described in Code of Federal Regulations, title 20, section 655.

 

Sec. 17.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 268A.15, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 8a.  Provider rate increases.  (a) Effective July 1, 2023, subject to the availability of additional funding, an annual growth factor adjustment of no less than a three percent increase for providers of extended employment services for persons with severe disabilities shall be authorized.  If there is sufficient funding appropriated, the commissioner shall increase reimbursement rates by the percentage of this adjustment.

 

(b) The commissioner of management and budget must include an annual inflationary adjustment in reimbursement rates for providers of extended employment services for persons with severe disabilities as a budget change request in each biennial detailed expenditure budget submitted to the legislature under section 16A.11.

 

Sec. 18.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 469.40, subdivision 11, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 11.  Public infrastructure project.  (a) "Public infrastructure project" means a project financed in part or in whole with public money in order to support the medical business entity's development plans, as identified in the DMCC development plan.  A public infrastructure project may:

 

(1) acquire real property and other assets associated with the real property;

 

(2) demolish, repair, or rehabilitate buildings;

 

(3) remediate land and buildings as required to prepare the property for acquisition or development;

 

(4) install, construct, or reconstruct elements of public infrastructure required to support the overall development of the destination medical center development district including, but not limited to,:  streets, roadways, utilities systems and related facilities,; utility relocations and replacements,; network and communication systems,; streetscape improvements,; drainage systems,; sewer and water systems,; subgrade structures and associated improvements,; landscaping,; facade construction and restoration,; design and predesign, including architectural, engineering, and similar services; legal, regulatory, and other compliance services; construction costs, including all materials and supplies; wayfinding and signage,; community engagement; transit costs incurred on or after March 16, 2020; and other components of community infrastructure;

 

(5) acquire, construct or reconstruct, and equip parking facilities and other facilities to encourage intermodal transportation and public transit;

 

(6) install, construct or reconstruct, furnish, and equip parks, cultural, and recreational facilities, facilities to promote tourism and hospitality, conferencing and conventions, and broadcast and related multimedia infrastructure;

 

(7) make related site improvements including, without limitation, excavation, earth retention, soil stabilization and correction, and site improvements to support the destination medical center development district;

 

(8) prepare land for private development and to sell or lease land;

 

(9) provide costs of relocation benefits to occupants of acquired properties; and


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(10) construct and equip all or a portion of one or more suitable structures on land owned by the city for sale or lease to private development; provided, however, that the portion of any structure directly financed by the city as a public infrastructure project must not be sold or leased to a medical business entity.

 

(b) A public infrastructure project is not a business subsidy under section 116J.993.

 

(c) Public infrastructure project includes the planning, preparation, and modification of the development plan under section 469.43.  The cost of that planning, preparation, and any modification is a capital cost of the public infrastructure project.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 19.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 469.47, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Definitions.  (a) For purposes of this section, the following terms have the meanings given them.

 

(b) "Commissioner" means the commissioner of employment and economic development.

 

(c) "Construction projects" means:

 

(1) for expenditures by a medical business entity, construction of buildings in the city for which the building permit was issued after June 30, 2013; and

 

(2) for any other expenditures, construction of privately owned buildings and other improvements that are undertaken pursuant to or as part of the development plan and are located within a medical center development district.

 

(d) "Expenditures" means expenditures made by a medical business entity or by an individual or private entity on construction projects for the capital cost of the project including, but not limited to:

 

(1) design and predesign, including architectural, engineering, and similar services;

 

(2) legal, regulatory, and other compliance costs of the project;

 

(3) land acquisition, demolition of existing improvements, and other site preparation costs;

 

(4) construction costs, including all materials and supplies of the project; and

 

(5) equipment and furnishings that are attached to or become part of the real property.

 

Expenditures excludes supplies and other items with a useful life of less than a year that are not used or consumed in constructing improvements to real property or are otherwise chargeable to capital costs.

 

(e) "Qualified expenditures for the year" means the total certified expenditures since June 30, 2013, through the end of the preceding year, minus $200,000,000.

 

(f) "Transit costs" means the portions of a public infrastructure project that are for public transit intended primarily to serve the district, such as including but not limited to buses and other means of transit, transit stations, equipment, bus charging stations or bus charging equipment, rights-of-way, and similar costs permitted under section 469.40, subdivision 11.  This provision includes transit costs incurred on or after March 16, 2020.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.


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Sec. 20.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 469.47, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5.  State transit aid.  (a) The city qualifies for state transit aid under this section if the county contributes the required local matching contribution under subdivision 6 or the city or county has agreed to make an equivalent contribution out of other funds for the year.

 

(b) If the city qualifies for aid under paragraph (a), the commissioner must pay the city the state transit aid in the amount calculated under this paragraph.  The amount of the state transit aid for a year equals the qualified expenditures for the year, as certified by the commissioner, multiplied by 0.75 percent, reduced by subject to the amount of the required local contribution under subdivision 6.  City or county contributions that are in excess of this ratio carry forward and are credited toward subsequent years.  The maximum amount of state transit aid payable in any year is limited to no more than $7,500,000.  If the commissioner determines that the city or county has not made the full required matching local contribution for the year, the commissioner must pay state transit aid only in proportion to the amount of for the matching contribution made for the year and any unpaid amount is a carryover aid.  The carryover aid must be paid in the first year after the required matching contribution for that prior year is made and in which the aid entitlement for the current year is less than the maximum annual limit, but only to the extent the carryover, when added to the current year aid, is less than the maximum annual limit.

 

(c) The commissioner, in consultation with the commissioner of management and budget, and representatives of the city and the corporation, must establish a total limit on the amount of state aid payable under this subdivision that will be adequate to finance, in combination with the local contribution, $116,000,000 of transit costs.

 

(d) The city must use state transit aid it receives under this subdivision for transit costs.  The city must maintain appropriate records to document the use of the funds under this requirement.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 21.  MINNESOTA EMPLOYER REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION FUND.

 

Subdivision 1.  Definitions.  (a) For the purposes of this section, the terms defined in this subdivision have the meanings given.

 

(b) "Applicant" means any person, whether employed or unemployed, seeking or entering into any arrangement for employment or change of employment with an eligible employer.

 

(c) "Commissioner" means the commissioner of employment and economic development.

 

(d) "Eligible employer" means an employer domiciled within the legal boundaries of Minnesota and having its principal place of business as identified in its certificate of incorporation in the state of Minnesota who:

 

(1) employs not more than 500 employees on any business day during the preceding calendar year; and

 

(2) generates $5,000,000 or less in gross annual revenue.

 

(e) "Employee" has the meaning given in Minnesota Statutes, section 363A.03, subdivision 15.

 

(f) "Individual with a disability" has the meaning given to "qualified disabled person" in Minnesota Statutes, section 363A.03, subdivision 36.

 

(g) "Reasonable accommodation" has the meaning given in Minnesota Statutes, section 363A.08, subdivision 6.

 

Subd. 2.  Reimbursement grant program established.  The commissioner shall establish a reasonable accommodation reimbursement grant program that reimburses eligible employers for the cost of expenses incurred in providing reasonable accommodations for individuals with a disability who are either applicants or employees of the eligible employer.


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Subd. 3.  Application.  (a) The commissioner must develop forms and procedures for soliciting and reviewing applications for reimbursement under this section. 

 

(b) The program shall award reimbursements to eligible employers to the extent that funds are available in the account established under subdivision 5 for this purpose.

 

(c) Applications shall be processed on a first-received, first-processed basis within each fiscal year until funding is exhausted.  Applications received after funding has been exhausted in a fiscal year are not eligible for reimbursement.

 

(d) Documentation for reimbursement shall be provided by eligible employers in a form approved by the commissioner.

 

Subd. 4.  Reimbursement awards.  The maximum total reimbursement per eligible employer in a fiscal year is $30,000 and:

 

(1) submissions for onetime reasonable accommodation expenses must be no less than $250 and no more than $15,000 per individual with a disability; and

 

(2) submissions for ongoing reasonable accommodation expenses have no minimum or maximum requirements.

 

Subd. 5.  Employer reasonable accommodation fund account established.  The employer reasonable accommodation fund account is created as an account in the special revenue fund.  Money in the account is appropriated to the commissioner for the purposes of reimbursing eligible employers under this section.

 

Subd. 6.  Technical assistance and consultation.  The commissioner may provide technical assistance regarding requests for reasonable accommodations.

 

Subd. 7.  Administration and marketing costs.  The commissioner may use up to 20 percent of the biennial appropriation for administration and marketing of this section.

 

Subd. 8.  Notification.  By September 1, 2023, or within 60 days following final enactment, whichever is later, and each year thereafter by June 30, the commissioner shall make publicly available information regarding the availability of funds for reasonable accommodation reimbursement and the procedure for requesting reimbursement under this section. 

 

Subd. 9.  Reports to the legislature.  By January 15, 2024, and each January 15 thereafter until expiration, the commissioner must submit a report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the house of representatives and the senate committees with jurisdiction over workforce development that details the use of grant funds.  This report must include data on the number of employer reimbursements the program made in the preceding calendar year.  The report must include:

 

(1) the number and type of accommodations requested;

 

(2) the cost of accommodations requested;

 

(3) the employers from which the requests were made;

 

(4) the number and type of accommodations that were denied and why;

 

(5) any remaining balance left in the account; and

 

(6) if the account was depleted, the date on which funds were exhausted and the number, type, and cost of accommodations that were not reimbursed to employers.


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Subd. 10.  Expiration.  This section expires June 30, 2025, or when money appropriated for its purpose expires, whichever is later.

 

Sec. 22.  ENGAGEMENT TO ADDRESS BARRIERS TO EMPLOYMENT.

 

The commissioner of employment and economic development shall engage stakeholders to identify barriers that adults with mental illness face in obtaining and retaining employment and recommend strategies to address those barriers.  The commissioner shall solicit feedback from advocacy organizations for people with mental illness, mental health providers, people with mental illness, organizations that support people with mental illness in obtaining employment, and employers.  The commissioner shall submit a plan to the legislative committees with jurisdiction over employment and human services before February 1, 2024, identifying the barriers to employment and making recommendations on how to best improve the employment rate among people with mental illness.

 

Sec. 23.  SOUTHWESTERN MINNESOTA WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT SCHOLARSHIP PILOT PROGRAM.

 

Subdivision 1.  Definitions.  (a) For purposes of this section, the following terms have the meanings given.

 

(b) "Commissioner" means the commissioner of employment and economic development.

 

(c) "Southwest Initiative Foundation" or "foundation" means a nonprofit organization that provides services to the following counties in southwest Minnesota:  Big Stone, Chippewa, Cottonwood, Jackson, Kandiyohi, Lac qui Parle, Lincoln, Lyon, McLeod, Meeker, Murray, Nobles, Pipestone, Redwood, Renville, Rock, Swift, and Yellow Medicine, and the Lower Sioux Indian Community and Upper Sioux Community.

 

(d) "Employer-sponsored applicant" means a student applicant with a local employer scholarship equal to or greater than 25 percent of the workforce development scholarship.

 

(e) "Eligible student" means a student applicant who:

 

(1) is eligible for resident or nonresident tuition;

 

(2) is enrolling in an eligible program as determined by the regional workforce development board; and

 

(3) is enrolling at least half-time at a Minnesota West college listed in subdivision 4.

 

(f) "Local employer" means an employer with a physical location in a county within the service area of the foundation listed in paragraph (c).

 

Subd. 2.  Program established.  The commissioner shall establish a southwestern Minnesota workforce development scholarship pilot program administered by the foundation to assist in meeting the workforce challenges in southwest Minnesota and enhance long-term economic self-sufficiency by connecting students, higher education facilities, employers, and communities.

 

Subd. 3.  Grant to the Southwest Initiative Foundation.  The commissioner shall award all grant funds to the foundation, which shall administer the southwestern Minnesota workforce development scholarship pilot program.  The foundation may use up to seven percent of grant funds for administrative costs.

 

Subd. 4.  Scholarship awards.  (a) The foundation shall coordinate available funds and award scholarships to the following Minnesota West colleges:


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(1) Canby;

 

(2) Granite Falls;

 

(3) Pipestone;

 

(4) Worthington;

 

(5) Jackson;

 

(6) Luverne; and

 

(7) Marshall.

 

(b) Scholarships shall be coordinated by the individual colleges listed in paragraph (a) and applied only after all other available grant funding through a last-dollar-in model.

 

(c) In awarding grants, priority shall first be given to applicants that are program-continuing applicants.  Priority shall then be given to employer-sponsored applicants.

 

(d) Scholarships are intended to supplement all other grant opportunities and to cover the full cost of attendance to the eligible students.

 

Subd. 5.  Program eligibility.  Scholarships shall be awarded to eligible students who are enrolled in or enrolling in a high-demand occupation associate degree, diploma, or certificate or industry-recognized credential program as defined annually by the applicable regional workforce development board.  Students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid if applicable to the program to which they are applying.

 

Subd. 6.  Renewal; cap.  A student who has been awarded a scholarship may apply in subsequent academic years, but total lifetime awards are not to exceed two full scholarships per student.  Students may only be awarded a second scholarship upon successful completion of the program and subsequent work period requirement.

 

Subd. 7.  Administration.  (a) The foundation and Minnesota West colleges shall establish an application process and other guidelines for implementing the pilot program.

 

(b) Each college shall receive from their respective workforce development board by December 1 of each year, commencing in 2023, a list of eligible programs administered by the college that are eligible for subsequent year scholarships.  The applicable workforce development board must consider data based on a workforce shortage for full-time employment requiring postsecondary education that is unique to the specific region, as reported in the most recent Department of Employment and Economic Development job vacancy survey data for the economic development region in which the college is located.  A workforce shortage area is one in which the job vacancy rate for full-time employment in a specific occupation in a region is higher than the state average vacancy rate for that same occupation.

 

Subd. 8.  Scholarship recipient requirements.  (a) A recipient of a scholarship awarded under the program established in this section shall:

 

(1) be enrolled in a high-demand occupation associate degree, diploma, or certificate or industry-recognized credential program as defined by the regional workforce development board and offered by a Minnesota West college;

 

(2) adhere to any applicable participating local employer program requirements;


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(3) commit to three years of full-time employment with:

 

(i) a sponsoring local employer; or

 

(ii) any qualified local employer within the high-demand occupations as defined by the regional workforce development board; and

 

(4) fulfill the three-year full-time employment commitment in a county within the service area of the foundation as listed in subdivision 1, paragraph (c).

 

(b) If a recipient of a scholarship fails to fulfill the requirements of paragraph (a), the foundation may convert the scholarship to a loan.  Amounts repaid from a loan shall be used to fund scholarship awards under this section.

 

Subd. 9.  Employer partnerships.  The foundation and Minnesota West colleges shall establish partnerships with qualified local employers and work to ensure that a percentage of the state funds appropriated to each college for the southwestern Minnesota workforce development scholarship program are equally matched with employer funds.

 

Subd. 10.  Report required.  The foundation must submit an annual report by December 31 of each year regarding the scholarship program to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees with jurisdiction over employment and economic development policy.  The first report is due no later than December 31, 2023.  The annual report shall include:

 

(1) the number of students receiving a scholarship at each participating college during the previous calendar year;

 

(2) the number of scholarships awarded for each program and type of program during the previous calendar year;

 

(3) the number of scholarship recipients who completed a program of study or certification;

 

(4) the number of scholarship recipients who secured employment by their graduation date and those who secured employment within three months of their graduation date;

 

(5) a list of the colleges that received funding, the amount of funding each institution received, and whether all withheld funds were distributed;

 

(6) a list of occupations scholarship recipients are entering;

 

(7) the number of students who were denied a scholarship;

 

(8) a list of participating local employers and amounts of any applicable employer contributions; and

 

(9) a list of recommendations to the legislature regarding potential program improvements.

 

Sec. 24.  UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE FINE REDUCTION AND INTEREST ELIMINATION.

 

By January 1, 2024, the commissioner of employment and economic development must make recommendations to the legislative committees with jurisdiction over workforce development for how the unemployment insurance system will reduce the fines and interest applied to misrepresentation overpayments.  The commissioner must provide a timeline for implementing a reduction of the 40 percent fine to 15 percent and an elimination of the 12 percent interest rate."


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Renumber the sections in sequence and correct the internal references

 

Delete the title and insert:

 

"A bill for an act relating to economic development; establishing a budget for workforce development efforts for the Department of Employment and Economic Development; appropriating money to the Department of Corrections for workforce training; modifying various workforce provisions; requiring reports; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 116J.5492, subdivisions 8, 10; 116J.55, subdivisions 1, 5, 6; 116L.361, subdivision 7; 116L.362, subdivision 1; 116L.364, subdivision 3; 116L.365, subdivision 1; 116L.56, subdivision 2; 116L.561, subdivision 5; 116L.562, subdivision 2; 268.035, subdivision 20; 268A.15, by adding a subdivision; 469.40, subdivision 11; 469.47, subdivisions 1, 5; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 116J; 116L."

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Ways and Means.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Olson, L., from the Committee on Ways and Means to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 2310, A bill for an act relating to state government; appropriating money for environment and natural resources; modifying prior appropriations; providing for and modifying disposition of certain receipts; modifying and establishing duties, authorities, and prohibitions regarding environment and natural resources; modifying and creating environment and natural resources programs; modifying and creating grant programs; reestablishing citizen board of Pollution Control Agency; reestablishing Legislative Water Commission; modifying Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources; modifying permit and environmental review requirements; modifying requirements for recreational vehicles; modifying state trail and state park provisions; establishing Lowland Conifer Carbon Reserve; modifying forestry provisions; modifying game and fish provisions; modifying regulation of farmed Cervidae; regulating certain seeds and pesticides; modifying Water Law; providing appointments; modifying and providing for fees; requiring reports; requiring rulemaking; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 13.643, subdivision 6; 16A.151, subdivision 2; 16A.152, subdivision 2; 17.118, subdivision 2; 18B.01, subdivision 31; 18B.09, subdivision 2, by adding a subdivision; 21.82, subdivision 3; 21.86, subdivision 2; 35.155, subdivisions 1, 4, 10, 11, 12, by adding subdivisions; 35.156, subdivision 2, by adding subdivisions; 84.02, by adding a subdivision; 84.0274, subdivision 6; 84.0276; 84.415, subdivisions 3, 6, 7, by adding a subdivision; 84.788, subdivision 5; 84.82, subdivision 2, by adding a subdivision; 84.821, subdivision 2; 84.84; 84.86, subdivision 1; 84.87, subdivision 1; 84.90, subdivision 7; 84.992, subdivisions 2, 5; 84D.02, subdivision 3; 84D.10, subdivision 3; 84D.15, subdivision 2; 85.015, subdivision 10; 85.052, subdivision 6; 85.055, subdivision 1; 85.536, subdivision 2; 85A.01, subdivision 1; 86B.005, by adding a subdivision; 86B.313, subdivision 4; 86B.415, subdivisions 1, 1a, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7; 89A.03, subdivision 5; 90.181, subdivision 2; 97A.015, by adding a subdivision; 97A.031; 97A.126; 97A.137, subdivision 3; 97A.315, subdivision 1; 97A.401, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 97A.405, subdivision 5; 97A.421, subdivision 3; 97A.473, subdivisions 2, 2a, 2b, 5, 5a; 97A.474, subdivision 2; 97A.475, subdivisions 6, 7, 8, 10, 10a, 11, 12, 13, 41; 97B.071; 97B.301, subdivision 6; 97B.516; 97B.668; 97C.087, subdivision 2; 97C.315, subdivision 1; 97C.345, subdivision 1; 97C.355, by adding a subdivision; 97C.371, subdivisions 1, 2, 4; 97C.395, subdivision 1; 97C.601, subdivision 1; 97C.605, subdivisions 1, 2c, 3; 97C.611; 97C.836; 103B.101, subdivisions 2, 9, 16, by adding a subdivision; 103B.103; 103C.501, subdivisions 1, 4, 5, 6, by adding a subdivision; 103D.605, subdivision 5; 103F.505; 103F.511, by adding subdivisions; 103G.005, by adding subdivisions; 103G.2242, subdivision 1; 103G.271, subdivision 6; 103G.287, subdivisions 2, 3; 103G.299, subdivisions 1, 2, 5, 10; 103G.301, subdivisions 2, 6, 7; 115.01, by adding subdivisions; 115.03, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 115.061; 115A.03, by adding a subdivision; 115A.1415; 115A.565, subdivisions 1, 3; 115B.17, subdivision 14; 115B.171, subdivision 3; 115B.52, subdivision 4; 116.02; 116.03, subdivisions 1, 2a; 116.06, subdivision 1, by adding


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subdivisions; 116.07, subdivision 6, by adding subdivisions; 116C.03, subdivision 2a; 116P.05, subdivisions 1, 1a, 2; 116P.09, subdivision 6; 116P.11; 116P.15; 116P.16; 116P.18; 168.1295, subdivision 1; 171.07, by adding a subdivision; 297A.94; 325E.046; 325F.072, subdivisions 1, 3, by adding a subdivision; 373.475; Laws 2022, chapter 94, section 2, subdivisions 5, 8, 9; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 3; 18B; 21; 84; 86B; 88; 97A; 97B; 97C; 103B; 103E; 103F; 103G; 115A; 116; 116P; 325E; 473; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 84.033, subdivision 3; 84.944, subdivision 3; 86B.101; 86B.305; 86B.313, subdivisions 2, 3; 97A.145, subdivision 2; 97C.605, subdivisions 2, 2a, 2b, 5; 103C.501, subdivisions 2, 3; 115.44, subdivision 9; 116.011; 325E.389; 325E.3891; Minnesota Rules, parts 6100.5000, subparts 3, 4, 5; 6100.5700, subpart 4; 6115.1220, subpart 8; 6256.0500, subparts 2, 2a, 2b, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8; 8400.0500; 8400.0550; 8400.0600, subparts 4, 5; 8400.0900, subparts 1, 2, 4, 5; 8400.1650; 8400.1700; 8400.1750; 8400.1800; 8400.1900.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Delete everything after the enacting clause and insert:

 

"ARTICLE 1

ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES APPROPRIATIONS

 

      Section 1.  ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES APPROPRIATIONS. 

 

The sums shown in the columns marked "Appropriations" are appropriated to the agencies and for the purposes specified in this article.  The appropriations are from the general fund, or another named fund, and are available for the fiscal years indicated for each purpose.  The figures "2024" and "2025" used in this article mean that the appropriations listed under them are available for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2024, or June 30, 2025, respectively.  "The first year" is fiscal year 2024.  "The second year" is fiscal year 2025.  "The biennium" is fiscal years 2024 and 2025.

 

 

 

 

APPROPRIATIONS

 

 

 

Available for the Year

 

 

 

Ending June 30

 

 

 

2024

2025

 

      Sec. 2.  POLLUTION CONTROL AGENCY

 

 

 

 

 

      Subdivision 1.  Total Appropriation

 

$276,096,000

 

$214,828,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

 

2025

General

151,113,000

81,891,000

State Government

 Special Revenue

85,000

90,000

Environmental

105,227,000

112,600,000

Remediation

19,671,000

20,247,000

 

The amounts that may be spent for each purpose are specified in the following subdivisions.

 

The commissioner must present the agency's biennial budget for fiscal years 2026 and 2027 to the legislature in a transparent way by agency division, including the proposed budget bill and presentations of the budget to committees and divisions with jurisdiction over the agency's budget.


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           Subd. 2.  Environmental Analysis and Outcomes

 

46,983,000

 

41,231,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

 

2025

General

28,970,000

20,714,000

Environmental

17,764,000

20,312,000

Remediation

249,000

205,000

 

(a) $122,000 the first year and $125,000 the second year are from the general fund for:

 

(1) a municipal liaison to assist municipalities in implementing and participating in the rulemaking process for water quality standards and navigating the NPDES/SDS permitting process;

 

(2) enhanced economic analysis in the rulemaking process for water quality standards, including more-specific analysis and identification of cost-effective permitting;

 

(3) developing statewide economic analyses and templates to reduce the amount of information and time required for municipalities to apply for variances from water quality standards; and

 

(4) coordinating with the Public Facilities Authority to identify and advocate for the resources needed for urban, suburban, and Greater Minnesota municipalities to achieve permit requirements.

 

(b) $216,000 the first year and $219,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for a monitoring program under Minnesota Statutes, section 116.454.

 

(c) $132,000 the first year and $137,000 the second year are for monitoring water quality and operating assistance programs.

 

(d) $390,000 the first year and $399,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for monitoring ambient air for hazardous pollutants.

 

(e) $106,000 the first year and $109,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for duties related to harmful chemicals in children's products under Minnesota Statutes, sections 116.9401 to 116.9407.  Of this amount, $68,000 the first year and $70,000 the second year are transferred to the commissioner of health.

 

(f) $128,000 the first year and $132,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for registering wastewater laboratories.

 

(g) $1,492,000 the first year and $1,519,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to continue perfluorochemical biomonitoring in eastern metropolitan communities, as recommended by the Environmental Health Tracking and


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Biomonitoring Advisory Panel, and to address other environmental health risks, including air quality.  The communities must include Hmong and other immigrant farming communities.  Of this amount, up to $1,226,000 the first year and $1,248,000 the second year are for transfer to the commissioner of health.

 

(h) $61,000 the first year and $62,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for the listing procedures for impaired waters required under this act.

 

(i) $72,000 the first year and $74,000 the second year are from the remediation fund for the leaking underground storage tank program to investigate, clean up, and prevent future releases from underground petroleum storage tanks and for the petroleum remediation program for vapor assessment and remediation.  These same annual amounts are transferred from the petroleum tank fund to the remediation fund.

 

(j) $500,000 the first year is to facilitate the collaboration and modeling of greenhouse gas impacts, costs, and benefits of strategies to reduce statewide greenhouse gas emissions.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(k) $20,266,000 the first year and $20,270,000 the second year are to establish and implement a local government water infrastructure grant program for local governmental units and Tribal governments.  Of this amount, $19,720,000 each year is for grants to support communities in planning and implementing projects that will allow for adaptation for a changing climate.  At least 50 percent of the money granted under this paragraph must be for projects in the seven-county metropolitan area.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027.  The base for this appropriation in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $270,000.

 

(l) $2,070,000 the first year and $2,070,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to develop and implement a drinking water protection and PFAS response program related to emerging issues, including Minnesota's PFAS Blueprint.

 

(m) $1,820,000 the second year is from the environmental fund to support improved management of data collected by the agency and its partners and regulated parties to facilitate decision-making and public access.

 

(n) $500,000 the first year is for developing and implementing firefighter biomonitoring protocols required under this act.  Of this amount, up to $250,000 may be transferred to the commissioner of health for biomonitoring of firefighters.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2025.


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(o) $2,000,000 the first year is to develop protocols to be used by agencies and departments for sampling and testing groundwater, surface water, public drinking water, and private wells for microplastics and nanoplastics and to begin implementation.  The commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency may transfer money appropriated under this paragraph to the commissioners of agriculture, natural resources, and health to implement the protocols developed.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2025.

 

(p) $50,000 the first year is from the remediation fund for the work group on PFAS manufacturer fees and report required under this act.

 

(q) $387,000 the first year and $90,000 the second year are to develop and implement the requirements for fish kills under Minnesota Statutes, sections 103G.216 and 103G.2165.  Of this amount, up to $331,000 the first year and $90,000 the second year may be transferred to the commissioners of health, natural resources, agriculture, and public safety and to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota as necessary to implement those sections.  The base for this appropriation for fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $7,000.

 

(r) $63,000 the first year and $92,000 the second year are for transfer to the commissioner of health for amending the health risk limit for PFOS.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026.

 

(s) $5,000,000 the first year is for community air-monitoring grants as provided in this act.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2025.

 

(t) $625,000 the first year and $779,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to adopt rules and implement air toxics emissions requirements under Minnesota Statutes, section 116.062.  The base for this appropriation is $669,000 in fiscal year 2026 and $1,400,000 in fiscal year 2027 and beyond.

 

      Subd. 3.  Industrial

 

54,056,000

 

34,308,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

 

2025

General

34,980,000

14,577,000

Environmental

17,355,000

17,958,000

Remediation

1,721,000

1,773,000

 

(a) $1,621,000 the first year and $1,670,000 the second year are from the remediation fund for the leaking underground storage tank program to investigate, clean up, and prevent future releases


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from underground petroleum storage tanks and for the petroleum remediation program for vapor assessment and remediation.  These same annual amounts are transferred from the petroleum tank fund to the remediation fund.

 

(b) $448,000 the first year and $457,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to further evaluate the use and reduction of trichloroethylene around Minnesota and identify its potential health effects on communities.  Of this amount, $145,000 the first year and $149,000 the second year are transferred to the commissioner of health.

 

(c) $4,000 the first year and $4,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to purchase air emissions monitoring equipment to support compliance and enforcement activities.

 

(d) $3,200,000 the first year and $3,200,000 the second year are to provide air emission reduction grants.  Of this amount, $2,800,000 each year is for grants to reduce air pollution at regulated facilities within environmental justice areas of concern.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, and is a onetime appropriation.

 

(e) $40,000 the first year and $40,000 the second year are for air compliance equipment maintenance.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(f) $20,000,000 the first year and $300,000 the second year are to support research on innovative technologies to treat difficult‑to‑manage pollutants and for implementation grants based on this research at taconite facilities.  Of this amount, $2,100,000 is for the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for academic and applied research through the MnDRIVE program at the Natural Resources Research Institute for research to foster economic development of the state's natural resources in an environmentally sound manner and $17,600,000 is for grants.  Of the $2,100,000, at least $900,000 is to develop and demonstrate technologies that enhance the long-term health and management of Minnesota's water and mineral resources.  This appropriation is for continued characterization of Minnesota's iron resources and development of next-generation process technologies for iron products and reduced effluent.  This research must be conducted in consultation with the Mineral Coordinating Committee established under Minnesota Statutes, section 93.0015.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027.

 

(g) $500,000 the first year and $500,000 the second year are for the purposes of biofuel wastewater monitoring requirements under Minnesota Statutes, section 115.03, subdivision 12.

 

(h) $250,000 the first year is for a life cycle assessment of the presence of neonicotinoid pesticide in the production of ethanol, biodiesel, and advanced biofuel, including feedstocks, coproducts, air emissions, and the fuel itself.  This is a onetime appropriation


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and is available until June 30, 2025.  No later than December 15, 2024, the commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency must submit the assessment, including recommendations, to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees with jurisdiction over agriculture and environment.

 

(i) $670,000 the first year and $522,000 the second year are from the general fund and $277,000 the first year and $277,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for the purposes of the nonexpiring state individual air quality permit requirements under Minnesota Statutes, section 116.07, subdivision 4m.  The base for this appropriation in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $277,000 from the environmental fund.

 

(j) $250,000 the first year and $250,000 the second year are for rulemaking and implementation of the odor management requirements under Minnesota Statutes, section 116.064.  The base for this appropriation is $250,000 in fiscal year 2026 and $500,000 in fiscal year 2027 and beyond.

 

(k) $9,526,000 the first year and $9,221,000 the second year are from the general fund for implementation of the environmental justice, cumulative impact analysis, and demographic analysis requirements under this act.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2028.  The base for this appropriation in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $9,021,000 from the environmental fund.

 

      Subd. 4.  Municipal

 

10,725,000

 

11,373,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

 

2025

General

761,000

767,000

State Government

 Special Revenue

 

85,000

 

90,000

Environmental

9,879,000

10,516,000

 

(a) $217,000 the first year and $223,000 the second year are for:

 

(1) a municipal liaison to assist municipalities in implementing and participating in the rulemaking process for water quality standards and navigating the NPDES/SDS permitting process;

 

(2) enhanced economic analysis in the rulemaking process for water quality standards, including more-specific analysis and identification of cost-effective permitting;

 

(3) developing statewide economic analyses and templates to reduce the amount of information and time required for municipalities to apply for variances from water quality standards; and


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(4) coordinating with the Public Facilities Authority to identify and advocate for the resources needed for municipalities to achieve permit requirements.

 

(b) $50,000 the first year and $50,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for transfer to the Office of Administrative Hearings to establish sanitary districts.

 

(c) $1,240,000 the first year and $1,338,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for subsurface sewage treatment system (SSTS) program administration and community technical assistance and education, including grants and technical assistance to communities for water-quality protection.  Of this amount, $350,000 each year is for assistance to counties through grants for SSTS program administration.  A county receiving a grant from this appropriation must submit the results achieved with the grant to the commissioner as part of its annual SSTS report.  Any unexpended balance in the first year does not cancel but is available in the second year.

 

(d) $994,000 the first year and $1,094,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to address the need for continued increased activity in new technology review, technical assistance for local governments, and enforcement under Minnesota Statutes, sections 115.55 to 115.58, and to complete the requirements of Laws 2003, chapter 128, article 1, section 165.

 

(e) Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 16A.28, the appropriations encumbered on or before June 30, 2025, as grants or contracts for subsurface sewage treatment systems, surface water and groundwater assessments, storm water, and water-quality protection in this subdivision are available until June 30, 2028.

 

      Subd. 5.  Operations

 

34,236,000

 

32,836,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

2025

 

 

 

General

23,250,000

21,859,000

Environmental

8,369,000

8,486,000

Remediation

2,617,000

2,491,000

 

(a) $1,154,000 the first year and $1,124,000 the second year are from the remediation fund for the leaking underground storage tank program to investigate, clean up, and prevent future releases from underground petroleum storage tanks and for the petroleum remediation program for vapor assessment and remediation.  These same annual amounts are transferred from the petroleum tank fund to the remediation fund.


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(b) $3,000,000 the first year and $3,109,000 the second year are to support agency information technology services provided at the enterprise and agency level to improve operations.

 

(c) $906,000 the first year and $919,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to develop and maintain systems to support agency permitting and regulatory business processes and data.

 

(d) $2,000,000 the first year and $2,000,000 the second year are to provide technical assistance to Tribal governments.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(e) $18,250,000 the first year and $16,750,000 the second year are to support modernizing and automating agency environmental programs and data systems and how the agency provides services to regulated parties, partners, and the public.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(f) $270,000 the first year and $270,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to support current and future career pathways for underrepresented students.

 

(g) $700,000 the first year and $700,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to improve the coordination, effectiveness, transparency, and accountability of the environmental review and permitting process.

 

(h) $438,000 the first year and $333,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency citizen members.

 

      Subd. 6.  Remediation

 

40,318,000

 

16,022,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

 

2025

General

25,000,000

-0-

Environmental

607,000

628,000

Remediation

14,711,000

15,394,000

 

(a) All money for environmental response, compensation, and compliance in the remediation fund not otherwise appropriated is appropriated to the commissioners of the Pollution Control Agency and agriculture for purposes of Minnesota Statutes, section 115B.20, subdivision 2, clauses (1), (2), (3), (6), and (7).  At the beginning of each fiscal year, the two commissioners must jointly submit to the commissioner of management and budget an annual spending plan that maximizes resource use and appropriately allocates the money between the two departments.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2025.


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(b) $415,000 the first year and $426,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to manage contaminated sediment projects at multiple sites identified in the St. Louis River remedial action plan to restore water quality in the St. Louis River Area of Concern.

 

(c) $4,476,000 the first year and $4,622,000 the second year are from the remediation fund for the leaking underground storage tank program to investigate, clean up, and prevent future releases from underground petroleum storage tanks and for the petroleum remediation program for vapor assessment and remediation.  These same annual amounts are transferred from the petroleum tank fund to the remediation fund.

 

(d) $308,000 the first year and $316,000 the second year are from the remediation fund for transfer to the commissioner of health for private water-supply monitoring and health assessment costs in areas contaminated by unpermitted mixed municipal solid waste disposal facilities and drinking water advisories and public information activities for areas contaminated by hazardous releases.

 

(e) $25,000,000 the first year is for grants to support planning, designing, and preparing for solutions for public water treatment systems contaminated with PFAS.  The grants are to reimburse local public water supply operators for source investigations, sampling and treating private drinking water wells, and evaluating solutions for treating private drinking water wells.  At least 50 percent of the money appropriated under this paragraph must be for grants in the seven-county metropolitan area.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, and is a onetime appropriation.

 

(f) $76,000 the first year is from the remediation fund for the petroleum tank release cleanup program duties and report required under this act.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

      Subd. 7.  Resource Management and Assistance

 

75,025,000

 

63,467,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

 

2025

General

31,477,000

18,655,000

Environmental

43,548,000

44,812,000

 

(a) Up to $150,000 the first year and $150,000 the second year may be transferred from the environmental fund to the small business environmental improvement loan account under Minnesota Statutes, section 116.993.


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(b) $1,000,000 the first year and $1,000,000 the second year are for competitive recycling grants under Minnesota Statutes, section 115A.565.  Of this amount, $300,000 the first year and $300,000 the second year are from the general fund, and $700,000 the first year and $700,000 the second year are from the environmental fund.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027.

 

(c) $694,000 the first year and $694,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for emission-reduction activities and grants to small businesses and other nonpoint-emission-reduction efforts.  Of this amount, $100,000 the first year and $100,000 the second year are to continue work with Clean Air Minnesota, and the commissioner may enter into an agreement with Environmental Initiative to support this effort.

 

(d) $22,450,000 the first year and $22,450,000 the second year are for SCORE block grants to counties.  Of this amount, $4,000,000 the first year and $4,000,000 the second year are from the general fund, and $18,450,000 the first year and $18,450,000 the second year are from the environmental fund.  The base in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $18,450,000 from the environmental fund.  For fiscal years 2024 and 2025, each county's allocation is based on Minnesota Statutes, section 115A.557, and $2,000,000 must be used only for waste prevention and reuse activities.

 

(e) $119,000 the first year and $119,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for environmental assistance grants or loans under Minnesota Statutes, section 115A.0716.

 

(f) $400,000 the first year and $400,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for grants to develop and expand recycling markets for Minnesota businesses.

 

(g) $767,000 the first year and $770,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for reducing and diverting food waste, redirecting edible food for consumption, and removing barriers to collecting and recovering organic waste.  Of this amount, $500,000 each year is for grants to increase food rescue and waste prevention.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027.

 

(h) $2,797,000 the first year and $2,811,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for the purposes of Minnesota Statutes, section 473.844.

 

(i) $318,000 the first year and $474,000 the second year are from the environmental fund to address chemicals in products, including to implement and enforce flame retardant provisions under Minnesota Statutes, section 325F.071, and perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances in food packaging provisions under Minnesota Statutes, section 325F.075.  Of this amount, $78,000 the first year and $80,000 the second year are transferred to the commissioner of health.


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(j) $180,000 the first year and $140,000 the second year are for quantifying climate-related impacts from projects for environmental review.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(k) $1,790,000 the first year and $70,000 the second year are for accelerating pollution prevention at small businesses.  Of this amount, $1,720,000 the first year is for zero-interest loans to phase out high-polluting equipment, products, and processes and replace with new options.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(l) $190,000 the first year and $190,000 the second year are to support the Greenstep Cities program.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(m) $420,000 the first year is to complete a study on the viability of recycling solar energy equipment.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(n) $650,000 the first year and $650,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for Minnesota GreenCorps investment.

 

(o) $4,210,000 the first year and $210,000 the second year are for PFAS reduction grants.  Of this amount, $4,000,000 the first year is for grants to industry and public entities to identify sources of PFAS entering facilities and to develop pollution prevention and reduction initiatives to reduce PFAS entering facilities, prevent releases, and monitor the effectiveness of these projects.  Priority must be given to projects in underserved communities.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027.

 

(p) $12,940,000 the first year and $12,940,000 the second year are for a waste prevention and reduction grants and loan program.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027.

 

(q) $825,000 the first year and $1,453,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for rulemaking and implementation of the new PFAS requirements under Minnesota Statutes, section 116.943.  Of this amount, $312,000 the first year and $468,000 the second year are for transfer to the commissioner of health.  The base for this appropriation is $1,115,000 in fiscal year 2026 and beyond.  The base for the transfer to the commissioner of health in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $468,000.

 

(r) $680,000 the first year is for the zero-waste report required in this act.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026.

 

(s) $1,592,000 the first year and $805,000 the second year are for zero-waste grants under Minnesota Statutes, section 115A.566.

 

(t) $35,000 the second year is from the environmental fund for the compostable labeling requirements under Minnesota Statutes, section 325E.046.  The base for this appropriation in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $68,000.


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(u) $175,000 the first year is for the rulemaking required under this act providing for the safe and lawful disposal of waste treated seed.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2025.

 

(v) $1,000,000 the first year is for a lead tackle reduction program that provides outreach, education, and opportunities to safely dispose of and exchange lead tackle throughout the state.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2025.

 

(w) $4,000,000 is for a grant to the owner of a biomass energy generation plant in Shakopee that uses waste heat from the generation of electricity in the malting process to purchase a wood dehydrator to facilitate disposal of wood that is infested by the emerald ash borer.  By October 1, 2024, the commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency must report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees and divisions with jurisdiction over environment and natural resources on the use of money appropriated under this paragraph.

 

(x) Any unencumbered grant and loan balances in the first year do not cancel but are available for grants and loans in the second year.  Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 16A.28, the appropriations encumbered on or before June 30, 2025, as contracts or grants for environmental assistance awarded under Minnesota Statutes, section 115A.0716; technical and research assistance under Minnesota Statutes, section 115A.152; technical assistance under Minnesota Statutes, section 115A.52; and pollution prevention assistance under Minnesota Statutes, section 115D.04, are available until June 30, 2027.

 

      Subd. 8.  Watershed

 

12,678,000

 

13,952,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

 

2025

General

4,821,000

3,906,000

Environmental

7,484,000

9,662,000

Remediation

373,000

384,000

 

(a) $3,000,000 the first year and $3,000,000 the second year are for grants to delegated counties to administer the county feedlot program under Minnesota Statutes, section 116.0711, subdivisions 2 and 3.  Money remaining after the first year is available for the second year.  The base for this appropriation in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $1,959,000.

 

(b) $236,000 the first year and $241,000 the second year are from the environmental fund for the costs of implementing general operating permits for feedlots over 1,000 animal units.


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(c) $125,000 the first year and $129,000 the second year are from the remediation fund for the leaking underground storage tank program to investigate, clean up, and prevent future releases from underground petroleum storage tanks and for the petroleum remediation program for vapor assessment and remediation.  These same annual amounts are transferred from the petroleum tank fund to the remediation fund.

 

(d) $459,000 the first year and $494,000 the second year are from the general fund and $1,680,000 the second year is from the environmental fund to implement feedlot financial assurance requirements and compile the annual feedlot and manure storage area lists required under Minnesota Statutes, section 116.07, subdivisions 7f and 7g.  The general fund base for this appropriation in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $315,000.  The environmental fund base in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $1,680,000.

 

(e) $700,000 the first year is for distribution to delegated counties based on registered feedlots and manure storage areas for inspections of manure storage areas and the abandoned manure storage area reports required under this act.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2025.

 

(f) $250,000 the first year is for a grant to the Minnesota Association of County Feedlot Officers to provide training on state feedlot requirements, working efficiently and effectively with producers, and reducing the incidence of manure or nutrients entering surface water or groundwater.

 

(g) $140,000 the first year and $140,000 the second year are for the Pig's Eye Landfill Task Force.

 

      Subd. 9.  Environmental Quality Board

 

2,075,000

 

1,639,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

 

2025

General

1,854,000

1,413,000

Environmental

221,000

226,000

 

$620,000 the first year and $140,000 the second year are to develop a Minnesota-based greenhouse gas sector and source‑specific guidance, including climate information, a greenhouse gas calculator, and technical assistance for users.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

      Subd. 10.  Transfers

 

 

 

 

 

(a) The commissioner must transfer up to $23,000,000 the first year and $24,000,000 the second year from the environmental fund to the remediation fund for purposes of the remediation fund under Minnesota Statutes, section 116.155, subdivision 2.  The base for this transfer is $24,000,000 in fiscal year 2026 and beyond.


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(b) By June 30, 2024, the commissioner of management and budget must transfer $29,055,000 from the general fund to the metropolitan landfill contingency action trust account in the remediation fund to restore the money transferred from the account as intended under Laws 2003, chapter 128, article 1, section 10, paragraph (e), and Laws 2005, First Special Session chapter 1, article 3, section 17, and to compensate the account for the estimated lost investment income.

 

      Sec. 3.  NATURAL RESOURCES

 

 

 

 

 

      Subdivision 1.  Total Appropriation

 

$569,950,000

 

$424,403,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

 

2025

General

307,778,000

165,064,000

Natural Resources

125,611,000

124,456,000

Game and Fish

129,903,000

131,814,000

Remediation

117,000

117,000

Permanent School

791,000

702,000

Reinvest in Minnesota

 Resources

5,750,000

2,250,000

 

The amounts that may be spent for each purpose are specified in the following subdivisions.

 

      Subd. 2.  Land and Mineral Resources Management

 

9,095,000

 

8,828,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

 

2025

General

4,095,000

3,828,000

Natural Resources

4,438,000

4,438,000

Game and Fish

344,000

344,000

Permanent School

218,000

218,000

 

(a) $319,000 the first year and $319,000 the second year are for environmental research relating to mine permitting, of which $200,000 each year is from the minerals management account in the natural resources fund and $119,000 each year is from the general fund.

 

(b) $3,383,000 the first year and $3,383,000 the second year are from the minerals management account in the natural resources fund for use as provided under Minnesota Statutes, section 93.2236, paragraph (c), for mineral resource management, projects to enhance future mineral income, and projects to promote new mineral-resource opportunities.


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3796

(c) $218,000 the first year and $218,000 the second year are transferred from the forest suspense account to the permanent school fund and are appropriated from the permanent school fund to secure maximum long-term economic return from the school trust lands consistent with fiduciary responsibilities and sound natural resources conservation and management principles.

 

(d) $338,000 the first year and $338,000 the second year are from the water management account in the natural resources fund for mining hydrology.

 

(e) $1,052,000 the first year and $242,000 the second year are for modernizing utility licensing for state lands and public waters.  The first year appropriation is available through fiscal year 2026.

 

(f) $125,000 the first year and $125,000 the second year are for conservation stewardship.

 

      Subd. 3.  Ecological and Water Resources

 

58,394,000

 

46,763,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

 

2025

General

37,664,000

26,008,000

Natural Resources

15,006,000

15,031,000

Game and Fish

5,724,000

5,724,000

 

(a) $5,397,000 the first year and $5,422,000 the second year are from the invasive species account in the natural resources fund and $2,831,000 the first year and $2,831,000 the second year are from the general fund for management, public awareness, assessment and monitoring research, and water access inspection to prevent the spread of invasive species; management of invasive plants in public waters; and management of terrestrial invasive species on state-administered lands.

 

(b) $6,056,000 the first year and $6,056,000 the second year are from the water management account in the natural resources fund for only the purposes specified in Minnesota Statutes, section 103G.27, subdivision 2.

 

(c) $124,000 the first year and $124,000 the second year are for a grant to the Mississippi Headwaters Board for up to 50 percent of the cost of implementing the comprehensive plan for the upper Mississippi within areas under the board's jurisdiction.  By December 15, 2025, the board must submit a report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees and divisions with jurisdiction over environment and natural resources on the activities funded under this paragraph and the progress made in implementing the comprehensive plan.


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3797

(d) $10,000 the first year and $10,000 the second year are for payment to the Leech Lake Band of Chippewa Indians to implement the band's portion of the comprehensive plan for the upper Mississippi River.

 

(e) $300,000 the first year and $300,000 the second year are for grants for up to 50 percent of the cost of implementing the Red River mediation agreement.  The base for this appropriation in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $264,000.

 

(f) $2,498,000 the first year and $2,498,000 the second year are from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund for only the purposes specified in Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, paragraph (h), clause (1).

 

(g) $1,150,000 the first year and $1,150,000 the second year are from the nongame wildlife management account in the natural resources fund for nongame wildlife management.  Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 290.431, $100,000 the first year and $100,000 the second year may be used for nongame wildlife information, education, and promotion.

 

(h) Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 84.943, $48,000 the first year and $48,000 the second year from the critical habitat private sector matching account may be used to publicize the critical habitat license plate match program.

 

(i) $5,700,000 the first year and $6,000,000 the second year are for the following activities:

 

(1) financial reimbursement and technical support to soil and water conservation districts or other local units of government for groundwater-level monitoring;

 

(2) surface water monitoring and analysis, including installing monitoring gauges;

 

(3) groundwater analysis to assist with water-appropriation permitting decisions;

 

(4) permit application review incorporating surface water and groundwater technical analysis;

 

(5) precipitation data and analysis to improve irrigation use;

 

(6) information technology, including electronic permitting and integrated data systems; and

 

(7) compliance and monitoring.


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(j) $410,000 the first year and $410,000 the second year are from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund and $500,000 the first year and $500,000 the second year are from the general fund for grants to the Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center at the University of Minnesota to prioritize, support, and develop research-based solutions that can reduce the effects of aquatic invasive species in Minnesota by preventing spread, controlling populations, and managing ecosystems and to advance knowledge to inspire action by others.

 

(k) $134,000 the first year and $134,000 the second year are for increased capacity for broadband utility licensing for state lands and public waters.

 

(l) $998,000 the first year and $568,000 the second year are for protecting and restoring carbon storage in state-administered peatlands by reviewing and updating the state's peatland inventory, piloting a restoration project, and piloting trust fund buyouts.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2028.

 

(m) $900,000 the first year is for a grant to the Minnesota Lakes and Rivers Advocates to work with civic leaders to purchase, install, and operate waterless cleaning stations for watercraft; conduct aquatic invasive species education; and implement education upgrades at public accesses to prevent invasive starry stonewort spread beyond the lakes already infested.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2025.

 

(n) $300,000 the first year is to prepare an analysis of alternative sources of water to resolve the water-use conflict in the Little Rock Creek area and to protect the stream from negative impacts due to groundwater use.  The analysis must be submitted to the legislative committees and divisions with jurisdiction over environment and natural resources by June 30, 2027, and include:

 

(1) a conceptual engineering plan;

 

(2) an estimate of implementation costs and funding needs;

 

(3) governance and operational considerations;

 

(4) a development schedule; and

 

(5) an economic evaluation of lost revenue if no action is taken.

 

(o) $6,000,000 the first year is for land acquisition and maintenance and restoration at Grey Cloud Dunes Scientific and Natural Area.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027.


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(p) $6,000,000 the first year is for improved maintenance at scientific and natural areas under Minnesota Statutes, section 86A.05, subdivision 5, including additional natural resource specialists and technicians, coordinators, seasonal crews, equipment, supplies, and administrative support.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027.

 

(q) The general fund base for the Ecological and Water Resources Division in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $25,004,000.

 

      Subd. 4.  Forest Management

 

116,725,000

 

76,067,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

 

2025

General

99,072,000

58,389,000

Natural Resources

16,161,000

16,161,000

Game and Fish

1,492,000

1,517,000

 

(a) $7,521,000 the first year and $7,521,000 the second year are for prevention, presuppression, and suppression costs of emergency firefighting and other costs incurred under Minnesota Statutes, section 88.12.  The amount necessary to pay for presuppression and suppression costs during the biennium is appropriated from the general fund.  By January 15 each year, the commissioner of natural resources must submit a report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the house and senate committees and divisions having jurisdiction over environment and natural resources finance that identifies all firefighting costs incurred and reimbursements received in the prior fiscal year.  These appropriations may not be transferred.  Any reimbursement of firefighting expenditures made to the commissioner from any source other than federal mobilizations must be deposited into the general fund.

 

(b) $15,386,000 the first year and $15,386,000 the second year are from the forest management investment account in the natural resources fund for only the purposes specified in Minnesota Statutes, section 89.039, subdivision 2.

 

(c) $1,492,000 the first year and $1,517,000 the second year are from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund to advance ecological classification systems (ECS), forest habitat, and invasive species management.

 

(d) $906,000 the first year and $926,000 the second year are for the Forest Resources Council to implement the Sustainable Forest Resources Act.


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(e) $1,143,000 the first year and $1,143,000 the second year are for the Next Generation Core Forestry data system.  Of this appropriation, $868,000 each year is from the general fund and $275,000 each year is from the forest management investment account in the natural resources fund.

 

(f) $500,000 the first year and $500,000 the second year are from the forest management investment account in the natural resources fund for forest road maintenance on state forest roads.

 

(g) $500,000 the first year and $500,000 the second year are for forest road maintenance on county forest roads.

 

(h) $2,086,000 the first year and $2,086,000 the second year are to support forest management, cost-share assistance, and inventory on private woodlands.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(i) $800,000 the first year and $800,000 the second year are to accelerate tree seed collection to support a growing demand for tree planting on public and private lands.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027.

 

(j) $10,400,000 the first year and $10,400,000 the second year are for grants to local and Tribal governments and nonprofit organizations to enhance community forest ecosystem health and sustainability under Minnesota Statutes, section 88.82, the Minnesota ReLeaf program.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027.  Money appropriated for grants under this paragraph may be used to pay reasonable costs incurred by the commissioner of natural resources to administer the grants.  The base is $400,000 beginning in fiscal year 2026.

 

(k) $3,000,000 the first year and $3,000,000 the second year are for forest stand improvement and to meet the reforestation requirements of Minnesota Statutes, section 89.002, subdivision 2.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(l) $5,000,000 is for purposes of the Lowland Conifer Carbon Reserve under Minnesota Statutes, section 88.85.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026.

 

(m) $37,000,000 the first year is for emerald ash borer response grants under Minnesota Statutes, section 88.83.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2030.  The commissioner may use up to two percent of this appropriation to administer the grants.  Of this amount:

 

(1) $9,000,000 is for grants to local units of government responding or actively preparing to respond to an emerald ash borer infestation; and

 

(2) $28,000,000 is for grants to a Minnesota nonprofit corporation that owns a cogeneration facility that serves a St. Paul district heating and cooling system.


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(n) $1,000,000 the first year is for grants to schools, including public and private schools, to plant trees on school grounds while providing hands-on learning opportunities for students.  A grant application under this section must be prepared jointly with the parent-teacher organization or similar parent organization for the school.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026.

 

      Subd. 5.  Parks and Trails Management

 

125,897,000

 

113,230,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

 

2025

General

50,094,000

38,707,000

Natural Resources

73,503,000

72,223,000

Game and Fish

2,300,000

2,300,000

 

(a) $7,985,000 the first year and $7,985,000 the second year are from the natural resources fund for state trail, park, and recreation area operations.  This appropriation is from revenue deposited in the natural resources fund under Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, paragraph (h), clause (2).

 

(b) $23,828,000 the first year and $23,828,000 the second year are from the state parks account in the natural resources fund to operate and maintain state parks and state recreation areas.

 

(c) $1,300,000 the first year and $1,300,000 the second year are from the natural resources fund for park and trail grants to local units of government on land to be maintained for at least 20 years for parks or trails.  Priority must be given for projects that are in underserved communities or that increase access to persons with disabilities.  This appropriation is from revenue deposited in the natural resources fund under Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, paragraph (h), clause (4).  Any unencumbered balance does not cancel at the end of the first year and is available for the second year.

 

(d) $9,624,000 the first year and $9,624,000 the second year are from the snowmobile trails and enforcement account in the natural resources fund for the snowmobile grants-in-aid program.  Any unencumbered balance does not cancel at the end of the first year and is available for the second year.

 

(e) $2,435,000 the first year and $2,435,000 the second year are from the natural resources fund for the off-highway vehicle grants‑in-aid program.  Of this amount, $1,960,000 each year is from the all-terrain vehicle account; $150,000 each year is from the off-highway motorcycle account; and $325,000 each year is from the off-road vehicle account.  Any unencumbered balance does not cancel at the end of the first year and is available for the second year.


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(f) $2,250,000 the first year and $2,250,000 the second year are from the state land and water conservation account in the natural resources fund for priorities established by the commissioner for eligible state projects and administrative and planning activities consistent with Minnesota Statutes, section 84.0264, and the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund Act.  Any unencumbered balance does not cancel at the end of the first year and is available for the second year.

 

(g) $250,000 the first year and $250,000 the second year are for matching grants for local parks and outdoor recreation areas under Minnesota Statutes, section 85.019, subdivision 2.

 

(h) $250,000 the first year and $250,000 the second year are for matching grants for local trail connections under Minnesota Statutes, section 85.019, subdivision 4c.

 

(i) $750,000 the first year is from the all-terrain vehicle account in the natural resources fund for a grant to St. Louis County to match other funding sources for design, right-of-way acquisition, permitting, and construction of trails within the Voyageur Country ATV trail system.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026.  This appropriation may be used as a local match to a 2023 state bonding award.

 

(j) $700,000 the first year is from the all-terrain vehicle account in the natural resources fund for a grant to St. Louis County to match other funding sources for design, right-of-way acquisition, permitting, and construction of a new trail within the Prospector trail system.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026.  This appropriation may be used as a local match to a 2023 state bonding award.

 

(k) $5,000,000 the first year is to facilitate the transfer of land within Upper Sioux Agency State Park required under this act, including but not limited to the acquisition of any land necessary to facilitate the transfer.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2033.

 

(l) $10,000,000 the first year is to remove hazardous trees and replace ash trees with more diverse, climate-adapted species within the state park system.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027.

 

(m) $100,000 the first year is for the report on state trails required under this act.

 

(n) $1,075,000 the first year and $1,075,000 the second year are from the water recreation account in the natural resources fund for maintaining and enhancing public water-access facilities.


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           Subd. 6.  Fish and Wildlife Management

 

116,489,000

 

99,230,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

 

2025

General

20,936,000

3,616,000

Natural Resources

2,082,000

2,082,000

Game and Fish

87,721,000

91,282,000

Reinvest in Minnesota

 Resources

5,750,000

2,250,000

 

(a) $10,458,000 the first year and $10,658,000 the second year are from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund only for activities specified under Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, paragraph (h), clause (1).  Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, five percent of this appropriation may be used for expanding hunter and angler recruitment and retention.

 

(b) $982,000 the first year and $982,000 the second year are from the general fund and $1,675,000 the first year and $1,675,000 the second year are from the game and fish fund for statewide response and management of chronic wasting disease.  The commissioner and the Board of Animal Health must each submit annual reports on chronic wasting disease activities funded in this biennium to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees and divisions with jurisdiction over environment and natural resources and agriculture.  The general fund base for this appropriation in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $282,000.

 

(c) $484,000 of the general fund appropriation for fiscal year 2023 in Laws 2021, First Special Session chapter 6, article 1, section 3, subdivision 6, paragraph (b), for planning for and emergency response to disease outbreaks in wildlife is canceled no later than June 29, 2023.

 

(d) $8,546,000 the first year and $8,546,000 the second year are from the deer management account for the purposes identified in Minnesota Statutes, section 97A.075, subdivision 1.

 

(e) $134,000 the first year and $134,000 the second year are for increased capacity for broadband utility licensing for state lands and public waters.

 

(f) $15,000,000 the first year is for enhancing prairies and grasslands and restoring wetlands on state-owned wildlife management areas to sequester more carbon and enhance climate resiliency.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027.


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(g) $500,000 the first year and $500,000 the second year are from the general fund and $500,000 the first year and $500,000 the second year are from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund for grants for natural-resource-based education and recreation programs serving youth under Minnesota Statutes, section 84.976, and for grant administration.  Priority must be given to projects benefiting underserved communities.  The base for this appropriation in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $500,000 from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund.  The general fund appropriation is onetime.

 

(h) $400,000 the first year and $400,000 the second year are from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund for the walk-in access program under Minnesota Statutes, section 97A.126.

 

(i) $1,000,000 the first year and $1,000,000 the second year are from the game and fish fund for investments in fish management activities.

 

(j) $2,000,000 the first year and $2,000,000 the second year are for grants to the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa to expand Minnesota's wild elk population and range.  Consideration must be given to moving elk from existing herds in northwest Minnesota to the area of the Fond du Lac State Forest and the Fond du Lac Reservation in Carlton and southern St. Louis Counties.  The Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa's elk reintroduction efforts must undergo thorough planning with the Department of Natural Resources to develop necessary capture and handling protocols, including protocols related to cervid disease management, and to produce postrelease state and Tribal elk comanagement plans.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026.

 

(k) $773,000 the first year is to examine the impacts of neonicotinoid exposure on the reproduction and survival of Minnesota's game species, including deer and prairie chicken.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027.

 

(l) $134,000 the first year and $134,000 the second year are from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund for native fish conservation and classification.

 

(m) $1,400,000 the first year is for designating swan protection areas under Minnesota Statutes, section 97A.096, and to provide increased education and outreach promoting the protection of swans in the state, including education regarding the restrictions on taking swans.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026.


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(n) $65,000 the first year is for preparing the report on feral pigs and mink required under this act and holding at least one public meeting on the topic.

 

(o) Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 84.943, subdivision 3, $5,750,000 the first year and $2,250,000 the second year are transferred from the Minnesota critical habitat private sector matching account to the reinvest in Minnesota resources fund and are appropriated from the reinvest in Minnesota resources fund for wildlife management area acquisition.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027.

 

(p) $82,000 the first year is for the native fish reports required under this act.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(q) Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, $300,000 the first year and $300,000 the second year are from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund for shooting sports facility grants under Minnesota Statutes, section 87A.10, including grants for archery facilities.  Grants must be matched with a nonstate match, which may include in-kind contributions.  Priority must be given to facilities that prohibit the use of lead ammunition.  Recipients of money appropriated under this paragraph must provide information on the toxic effects of lead.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026.  This appropriation must be allocated as follows:

 

(1) $200,000 each fiscal year is for grants of $25,000 or less; and

 

(2) $100,000 each fiscal year is for grants in excess of $25,000.

 

      Subd. 7.  Enforcement

 

64,672,000

 

67,712,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

 

2025

General

18,322,000

22,937,000

Natural Resources

13,911,000

14,011,000

Game and Fish

32,322,000

30,647,000

Remediation

117,000

117,000

 

(a) $1,718,000 the first year and $1,718,000 the second year are from the general fund for enforcement efforts to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species.

 

(b) $2,080,000 the first year and $1,892,000 the second year are from the heritage enhancement account in the game and fish fund for only the purposes specified under Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, paragraph (h), clause (1).


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(c) $1,442,000 the first year and $1,442,000 the second year are from the water recreation account in the natural resources fund for grants to counties for boat and water safety.  Any unencumbered balance does not cancel at the end of the first year and is available for the second year.

 

(d) $315,000 the first year and $315,000 the second year are from the snowmobile trails and enforcement account in the natural resources fund for grants to local law enforcement agencies for snowmobile enforcement activities.  Any unencumbered balance does not cancel at the end of the first year and is available for the second year.

 

(e) $250,000 the first year and $250,000 the second year are from the all-terrain vehicle account in the natural resources fund for grants to qualifying organizations to assist in safety and environmental education and monitoring trails on public lands under Minnesota Statutes, section 84.9011.  Grants issued under this paragraph must be issued through a formal agreement with the organization.  By December 15 each year, an organization receiving a grant under this paragraph must report to the commissioner with details on expenditures and outcomes from the grant.  Of this appropriation, $25,000 each year is for administering these grants.  Any unencumbered balance does not cancel at the end of the first year and is available for the second year.

 

(f) $510,000 the first year and $510,000 the second year are from the natural resources fund for grants to county law enforcement agencies for off-highway vehicle enforcement and public education activities based on off-highway vehicle use in the county.  Of this amount, $498,000 each year is from the all-terrain vehicle account, $11,000 each year is from the off-highway motorcycle account, and $1,000 each year is from the off-road vehicle account.  The county enforcement agencies may use money received under this appropriation to make grants to other local enforcement agencies within the county that have a high concentration of off-highway vehicle use.  Of this appropriation, $25,000 each year is for administering the grants.  Any unencumbered balance does not cancel at the end of the first year and is available for the second year.

 

(g) $2,250,000 the first year and $5,734,000 the second year are appropriated for inspections, investigations, and enforcement activities taken in conjunction with the Board of Animal Health for the white-tailed deer farm program and for statewide response and management of chronic wasting disease.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027.  The base for fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $3,250,000.

 

(h) $3,000,000 of the general fund appropriation for fiscal years 2022 and 2023 in Laws 2021, First Special Session chapter 6, article 1, section 3, subdivision 7, paragraph (i), for inspections, investigations, and enforcement activities taken in conjunction with the Board of Animal Health for the white-tailed deer farm program is canceled no later than June 29, 2023.


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(i) $3,050,000 the first year is for modernizing the enforcement aviation fleet.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027.

 

(j) $360,000 the first year and $360,000 the second year are for training department enforcement officers and for maintaining and storing equipment for conservation officer public safety responses.  The training may not include training for duties unrelated to enforcement of game and fish laws.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

      Subd. 8.  Operations Support

 

2,434,000

 

1,408,000

 

(a) $1,684,000 the first year and $1,408,000 second year are for information technology security and modernization.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(b) $750,000 the first year is for legal costs.  The unencumbered amount of the general fund appropriation in Laws 2019, First Special Session chapter 4, article 1, section 3, subdivision 8, for legal costs, estimated to be $750,000, is canceled no later than June 29, 2023.

 

      Subd. 9.  Pass Through Funds

 

11,244,000

 

11,165,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

 

2025

General

10,161,000

10,171,000

Natural Resources

510,000

510,000

Permanent School

573,000

484,000

 

(a) $510,000 the first year and $510,000 the second year are from the natural resources fund for grants to be divided equally between the city of St. Paul for the Como Park Zoo and Conservatory and the city of Duluth for the Lake Superior Zoo.  This appropriation is from revenue deposited to the natural resources fund under Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, paragraph (h), clause (5).

 

(b) $211,000 the first year and $221,000 the second year are for the Office of School Trust Lands.

 

(c) $250,000 the first year and $150,000 the second year are transferred from the forest suspense account to the permanent school fund and are appropriated from the permanent school fund for transaction and project management costs for divesting of school trust lands within Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness.

 

(d) $323,000 the first year and $334,000 the second year are transferred from the forest suspense account to the permanent school fund and are appropriated from the permanent school fund for the Office of School Trust Lands.


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(e) $9,950,000 the first year and $9,950,000 the second year are to be added as a supplement to the 1854 Treaty Area agreement payment under Minnesota Statutes, section 97A.165.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

      Subd. 10.  Get Out MORE (Modernizing Outdoor Recreation Experiences)

 

65,000,000

 

 

-0-

 

(a) $65,000,000 the first year is for modernizing Minnesota's state‑managed outdoor recreation experiences.  Of this amount:

 

(1) $25,000,000 is for enhancing access and welcoming new users to public lands and outdoor recreation facilities, including improvements to improve climate resiliency;

 

(2) $4,000,000 is for modernizing camping and related infrastructure, including improvements to improve climate resiliency;

 

(3) $25,000,000 is for modernizing fish hatcheries and fishing infrastructure; and

 

(4) $11,000,000 is for restoring streams and modernizing water‑related infrastructure with priority given to fish habitat improvements, dam removal, and improvements to improve climate resiliency.

 

(b) The commissioner may reallocate money appropriated in paragraph (a) across those purposes based on project readiness and priority.  The appropriations in paragraph (a) are available until June 30, 2029.

 

      Subd. 11.  Fiscal Year 2023 Appropriation

 

 

 

 

 

$1,000,000 in fiscal year 2023 is from the general fund to address safety concerns at the drill core library.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026.

 

      EFFECTIVE DATE.  Subdivisions 6, 7, 8, and 11 are effective the day following final enactment.

 

      Sec. 4.  BOARD OF WATER AND SOIL RESOURCES

$52,086,000

 

$46,574,000

 

(a) $3,116,000 the first year and $3,116,000 the second year are for grants and payments to soil and water conservation districts for accomplishing the purposes of Minnesota Statutes, chapter 103C, and for other general purposes, nonpoint engineering, and implementation and stewardship of the reinvest in Minnesota reserve program.  Expenditures may be made from this appropriation for supplies and services benefiting soil and water conservation districts.  Any district receiving a payment under this paragraph must maintain a website that publishes, at a minimum, the district's annual report, annual audit, annual budget, and meeting notices.


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(b) $761,000 the first year and $761,000 the second year are to implement, enforce, and provide oversight for the Wetland Conservation Act, including administering the wetland banking program and in-lieu fee mechanism.

 

(c) $1,560,000 the first year and $1,560,000 the second year are for the following:

 

(1) $1,460,000 each year is for cost-sharing programs of soil and water conservation districts for accomplishing projects and practices consistent with Minnesota Statutes, section 103C.501, including perennially vegetated riparian buffers, erosion control, water retention and treatment, water quality cost-sharing for feedlots under 500 animal units and nutrient and manure management projects in watersheds where there are impaired waters, and other high-priority conservation practices; and

 

(2) $100,000 each year is for county cooperative weed management programs and to restore native plants at selected invasive species management sites.

 

(d) $166,000 the first year and $166,000 the second year are to provide technical assistance to local drainage management officials and for the costs of the Drainage Work Group.  The board must coordinate the activities of the Drainage Work Group according to Minnesota Statutes, section 103B.101, subdivision 13.  The Drainage Work Group must review a drainage authority's power under Minnesota Statutes, chapter 103E, to consider the abandonment or dismantling of drainage systems; to re-meander, restore, or reconstruct a natural waterway that has been modified by drainage; or to deconstruct dikes, dams, or other water-control structures.

 

(e) $100,000 the first year and $100,000 the second year are for a grant to the Red River Basin Commission for water quality and floodplain management, including program administration.  This appropriation must be matched by nonstate funds.

 

(f) $140,000 the first year and $140,000 the second year are for grants to Area II Minnesota River Basin Projects for floodplain management.

 

(g) $125,000 the first year and $125,000 the second year are for conservation easement stewardship.

 

(h) $240,000 the first year and $240,000 the second year are for a grant to the Lower Minnesota River Watershed District to defray the annual cost of operating and maintaining sites for dredge spoil to sustain the state, national, and international commercial and recreational navigation on the lower Minnesota River.


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3810

(i) $2,000,000 the first year and $2,000,000 the second year are for the lawns to legumes program under Minnesota Statutes, section 103B.104.  The board may enter into agreements with local governments, Metro Blooms, and other organizations to support this effort.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2029.  The base for fiscal year 2026 and each year thereafter is $250,000.

 

(j) $2,000,000 the first year and $2,000,000 the second year are for the habitat enhancement landscape program under Minnesota Statutes, section 103B.106.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2029.

 

(k) $203,000 the first year and $203,000 the second year are for soil health practice adoption purposes consistent with the cost‑sharing provisions of Minnesota Statutes, section 103C.501, and for soil health program responsibilities in consultation with the University of Minnesota Office for Soil Health.

 

(l) $8,500,000 the first year and $8,500,000 the second year are for conservation easements and to restore and enhance grasslands and adjacent lands consistent with Minnesota Statutes, sections 103F.501 to 103F.531, for the purposes of climate resiliency, adaptation, carbon sequestration, and related benefits.  Of this amount, up to $423,000 is for deposit in the water and soil conservation easement stewardship account established under Minnesota Statutes, section 103B.103.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2029.  The board must give priority to leveraging nonstate funding, including practices, programs, and projects funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture via the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program, the Conservation Reserve Program, the Federal Inflation Reduction Act, the Federal Farm Bill, or the Climate-Smart Commodities Program.

 

(m) $2,500,000 the first year and $5,000,000 the second year are to acquire conservation easements and to restore and enhance peatlands and adjacent lands consistent with Minnesota Statutes, sections 103F.501 to 103F.531, for the purposes of climate resiliency, adaptation, carbon sequestration, and related benefits.  Of this amount, up to $299,000 is for deposit in the water and soil conservation easement stewardship account established under Minnesota Statutes, section 103B.103.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2029.  The board must give priority to leveraging nonstate funding, including practices, programs, and projects funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture via the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program, the Conservation Reserve Program, the Federal Inflation Reduction Act, the Federal Farm Bill, or the Climate-Smart Commodities Program.


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(n) $3,550,000 the first year and $3,550,000 the second year are to enhance existing easements established under Minnesota Statutes, sections 103F.501 to 103F.531.  Enhancements are for the purposes of climate resiliency, adaptation, and carbon sequestration and include but are not limited to increasing biodiversity and mitigating the effects of rainfall and runoff events.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2029.  The board must give priority to leveraging nonstate funding, including practices, programs, and projects funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture via the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program, the Conservation Reserve Program, the Federal Inflation Reduction Act, the Federal Farm Bill, or the Climate-Smart Commodities Program.

 

(o) $8,500,000 the first year and $8,500,000 the second year are for water quality and storage practices and projects to protect infrastructure, improve water quality and related public benefits, and mitigate climate change impacts consistent with Minnesota Statutes, sections 103F.05 and 103F.06.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2029.  The board must give priority to leveraging nonstate funding, including practices, programs, and projects funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture via the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program, the Conservation Reserve Program, the Federal Inflation Reduction Act, the Federal Farm Bill, or the Climate-Smart Commodities Program.

 

(p) $4,673,000 the first year and $4,673,000 the second year are for natural resources block grants to local governments to implement the Wetland Conservation Act and shoreland management program under Minnesota Statutes, chapter 103F, and local water management responsibilities under Minnesota Statutes, chapter 103B.  The board may reduce the amount of the natural resources block grant to a county by an amount equal to any reduction in the county's general services allocation to a soil and water conservation district from the county's previous year allocation when the board determines that the reduction was disproportionate.  The base for this appropriation in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $3,423,000.

 

(q) $129,000 the first year and $136,000 the second year are to accomplish the objectives of Minnesota Statutes, section 10.65, and related Tribal government coordination.  The base for fiscal year 2026 and each year thereafter is $144,000.

 

(r) $5,000,000 the first year is to provide onetime state incentive payments to enrollees in the federal Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) during the continuous enrollment period and to enroll complementary areas in conservation easements consistent with Minnesota Statutes, section 103F.515.  The board may establish payment rates based on land valuation and on environmental


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3812

benefit criteria, including but not limited to surface water or groundwater pollution reduction, drinking water protection, soil health, pollinator and wildlife habitat, and other conservation enhancements.  The board may use state funds to implement the program and to provide technical assistance to landowners or their agents to fulfill enrollment and contract provisions.  The board must consult with the commissioners of agriculture, health, natural resources, and the Pollution Control Agency and the United States Department of Agriculture in establishing program criteria.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027.

 

(s) $3,000,000 the first year is to acquire conservation easements from landowners to preserve, restore, create, and enhance wetlands and associated uplands of prairie and grasslands and to restore and enhance rivers and streams, riparian lands, and associated uplands of prairie and grasslands, in order to protect soil and water quality, support fish and wildlife habitat, reduce flood damage, and provide other public benefits.  Minnesota Statutes, section 103F.515, applies to this program.  The board must give priority to leveraging federal money by enrolling targeted new lands or enrolling environmentally sensitive lands that have expiring federal conservation agreements.  The board is authorized to enter into new agreements and amend past agreements with landowners as required by Minnesota Statutes, section 103F.515, subdivision 5, to allow for restoration.  Up to five percent of this appropriation may be used for restoration and enhancement.

 

(t) $200,000 the first year is to establish the drainage registry information portal under Minnesota Statutes, section 103E.122.

 

(u) $5,623,000 the first year and $5,804,000 the second year are for agency administration and operation of the Board of Water and Soil Resources.

 

(v) The board may shift money in this section and may adjust the technical and administrative assistance portion of the funds to leverage federal or other nonstate funds or to address accountability, oversight, local government performance, or high‑priority needs.

 

(w) Returned grants and payments are available for two years after they are returned or regranted, whichever is later.  Funds must be regranted consistent with the purposes of this section.  If an appropriation for grants in either year is insufficient, the appropriation in the other year is available for it.

 

(x) Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 16B.97, grants awarded from appropriations in this section are exempt from the Department of Administration, Office of Grants Management Policy 08-08 Grant Payments and 08-10 Grant Monitoring.


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           Sec. 5.  METROPOLITAN COUNCIL

 

$47,490,000

 

$16,490,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

 

2025

General

38,540,000

7,540,000

Natural Resources

8,950,000

8,950,000

 

(a) $7,540,000 the first year and $7,540,000 the second year are for metropolitan-area regional parks operation and maintenance according to Minnesota Statutes, section 473.351.  The base for this appropriation in fiscal year 2026 and beyond is $2,540,000.

 

(b) $8,950,000 the first year and $8,950,000 the second year are from the natural resources fund for metropolitan-area regional parks and trails maintenance and operations.  This appropriation is from revenue deposited in the natural resources fund under Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, paragraph (h), clause (3).

 

(c) $5,000,000 the first year is for developing a decision-making support tool set to help local partners quantify the risks of a changing climate and prioritize strategies that mitigate those risks.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027.

 

(d) $9,000,000 the first year is to modernize regional parks and trails.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027.

 

(e) $5,000,000 the first year is for reducing the amount of inflow and infiltration to the Metropolitan Council's metropolitan sanitary sewer disposal system.  Of this amount, $4,000,000 is for grants to cities for capital improvements in municipal wastewater collection systems under Minnesota Statutes, section 473.5491, and $1,000,000 is for grants and loans to inspect, repair, and replace privately owned sewer service lines.  Priority for grants and loans for privately owned lines must be given to applicants with a household income at or below 80 percent of area median income.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026.

 

(f) $9,000,000 the first year is for grants to implementing agencies to remove hazardous trees and replace ash trees with more diverse, climate-adapted species within the metropolitan regional park system.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(g) $3,000,000 the first year is to develop a comprehensive plan to ensure communities in the White Bear Lake area have access to sufficient safe drinking water to allow for municipal growth while simultaneously ensuring the sustainability of surface water and groundwater resources to supply the needs of future generations.  The Metropolitan Council must establish a work group consisting


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3814

of the commissioners of natural resources, health, and the Pollution Control Agency or their designees and representatives from the Metropolitan Area Water Supply Advisory Committee; the St. Paul Regional Water Services; the cities of Stillwater, Mahtomedi, Hugo, Lake Elmo, Lino Lakes, North St. Paul, Oakdale, Vadnais Heights, Shoreview, Woodbury, New Brighton, and White Bear Lake; and the town of White Bear to advise the council in developing the comprehensive plan.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027.  The comprehensive plan must:

 

(1) evaluate methods for conserving and recharging groundwater in the area, including:

 

(i) converting water supplies that are groundwater dependent to total or partial supplies from surface water sources;

 

(ii) reusing water, including water discharged from contaminated wells;

 

(iii) projects designed to increase groundwater recharge; and

 

(iv) other methods for reducing groundwater use;

 

(2) based on the evaluation conducted under clause (1), determine which existing groundwater supply wells, if converted to surface water sources, would be most effective and efficient in ensuring future water sustainability in the area;

 

(3) identify a long-term plan for converting groundwater supply wells identified in clause (2) to surface water sources, including recommendations on water supply governance and concept-level engineering that addresses preliminary design considerations, including supply source, treatment, distribution, operation, and financing needed to complete any changes to water supply infrastructure;

 

(4) include any policy and funding recommendations for converting groundwater supply wells to surface water sources, recommendations for treating and reusing wastewater, and any other recommendations for additional measures that reduce groundwater use, promote water reuse, and increase groundwater recharge;

 

(5) include any policy and funding recommendations for local wastewater treatment and recharge; and

 

(6) be submitted to the chairs and ranking minority members of the house of representatives and senate committees and divisions with jurisdiction over environment and natural resources finance and policy by June 30, 2027.


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           Sec. 6.  CONSERVATION CORPS MINNESOTA

 

$1,195,000

 

$1,195,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

 

2025

General

705,000

705,000

Natural Resources

490,000

490,000

 

Conservation Corps Minnesota may receive money appropriated from the natural resources fund under this section only as provided in an agreement with the commissioner of natural resources.

 

      Sec. 7.  ZOOLOGICAL BOARD

 

$14,494,000

 

$13,812,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

2025

 

General

14,239,000

13,557,000

Natural Resources

255,000

255,000

 

(a) $255,000 the first year and $255,000 the second year are from the natural resources fund from revenue deposited under Minnesota Statutes, section 297A.94, paragraph (h), clause (5).

 

(b) $850,000 the first year is to improve safety and security at the Minnesota Zoo.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(c) $250,000 the first year is for removing hazardous trees and replacing ash trees with more diverse, climate-adapted species.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

      Sec. 8.  SCIENCE MUSEUM

 

$10,200,000

 

$1,710,000

 

$9,000,000 the first year and $450,000 the second year are for debt reduction, rehiring and retaining employees, and reducing entrance fees for fiscal years 2024 and 2025.

 

      Sec. 9.  LEGISLATIVE COORDINATING COMMISSION

$52,000

 

$52,000

 

$52,000 the first year and $52,000 the second year are for the Legislative Water Commission established in this act.

 

      Sec. 10.  UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

 

$8,433,000

 

$1,856,000

 

(a) $1,633,000 the first year and $1,856,000 the second year are for chronic wasting disease contingency plans developed by the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy.  The center must develop, refine, and share with relevant experts and stakeholders contingency plans regarding the potential transmission of chronic wasting disease from Cervidae to humans, livestock, and other


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3816

species.  The contingency plans must provide a blueprint for preparedness and response planning documents, including authoritative risk communication, education, and outreach materials.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2026.

 

(b) $200,000 the first year is for the University of Minnesota Water Council to develop a scope of work, timeline, and budget for the 50-year clean water plan as required under this act.

 

(c) $6,600,000 the first year is for the Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center to enhance and implement the center's aquatic invasive species research-based solutions through:

 

(1) implementation of a watershed-scale carp management plan and additional research focused on site-specific method refinement and evaluation;

 

(2) creation of a long-term monitoring program with state and local partners that evaluates the feasibility of whole-lake zebra mussel control projects and the development of criteria for selecting and managing lakes;

 

(3) refinement and implementation of large-scale surveillance and early detection methods for high-priority aquatic invasive species, including but not limited to zebra mussels, spiny water flea, and starry stonewort; and

 

(4) development and sharing, with relevant experts and stakeholders, contingency plans regarding the potential risks of aquatic invasive species.  The contingency plans must provide a blueprint for preparedness and response planning documents, including authoritative risk communication, education, and outreach materials.  The communication, education, and outreach materials must be prepared in multiple languages, including but not limited to Tribal languages.

 

(d) The board must ensure that the Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center coordinates research activities funded under paragraph (c) with Tribal governments.

 

(e) The appropriation under paragraph (c) is onetime and available until June 30, 2027. 

 

      Sec. 11.  PUBLIC SAFETY

 

$-0-

 

$229,000

 

$229,000 the second year is from the fire safety account in the special revenue fund for purposes of the class B firefighting foam requirements under Minnesota Statutes, section 325F.072.

 

Sec. 12.  APPROPRIATIONS GIVEN EFFECT ONCE.

 

If an appropriation or transfer in this article is enacted more than once during the 2023 regular session, the appropriation or transfer must be given effect once.


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ARTICLE 2

ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES TRUST FUND

 

      Section 1.  APPROPRIATIONS. 

 

The sums shown in the columns marked "Appropriations" are appropriated to the agencies and for the purposes specified in this article.  The appropriations are from the environment and natural resources trust fund, or another named fund, and are available for the fiscal years indicated for each purpose.  The figures "2024" and "2025" used in this article mean that the appropriations listed under them are available for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2024, or June 30, 2025, respectively.  "The first year" is fiscal year 2024.  "The second year" is fiscal year 2025.  "The biennium" is fiscal years 2024 and 2025.  Any unencumbered balance remaining in the first year does not cancel and is available for the second year or until the end of the appropriation.  These are onetime appropriations.

 

 

 

 

APPROPRIATIONS

 

 

 

Available for the Year

 

 

 

Ending June 30

 

 

 

2024

2025

 

      Sec. 2.  MINNESOTA RESOURCES

 

 

 

 

 

      Subdivision 1.  Total Appropriation

 

$79,833,000

 

$-0-

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2024

 

2025

Environment and  

 Natural Resources

 Trust Fund

79,644,000

-0-

Great Lakes Protection

 Account

189,000

-0-

 

The amounts that may be spent for each purpose are specified in the following subdivisions.

 

      Subd. 2.  Definitions

 

 

 

 

 

(a) "Trust fund" means the Minnesota environment and natural resources trust fund established under the Minnesota Constitution, article XI, section 14.

 

(b) "Great Lakes protection account" means the account referred to in Minnesota Statutes, section 116Q.02.

 

      Subd. 3.  Foundational Natural Resource Data and Information

 

8,219,000

 

 

-0-

 

(a) Assessing Restorations for Rusty-Patched and Other Bumblebee Habitat

 

 

 

 

$75,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Friends of the Mississippi River to assess how prairie restoration and different


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restoration seeding methods affect bumblebee abundance, diversity, and habitat and make recommendations to improve restoration outcomes.

 

(b) Removing Barriers to Carbon Market Entry

 

 

 

 

 

$482,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to develop ground-tested carbon stock models of forest resources throughout Minnesota to enable better resource management of public and private forests as well as generate reliable tools for landowners seeking to enter carbon markets.

 

(c) Mapping Migratory Bird Pit Stops in Minnesota

 

 

 

 

 

$340,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the National Audubon Society, Minnesota office, to identify avian migratory stopover sites, develop a shared decision-support tool, and publish guidance for conserving migratory birds in Minnesota.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered.

 

(d) Enhancing Knowledge of Minnesota River Fish Ecology

 

 

 

 

$199,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to collect baseline information about the diets, distribution, status, and movement patterns of fish in the Minnesota River to inform management and conservation decisions.

 

(e) Changing Distribution of Flying Squirrel Species in Minnesota

 

 

 

 

$186,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the Natural Resources Research Institute in Duluth to determine current distribution and habitat associations of northern and southern flying squirrels to fill key knowledge gaps in flying squirrel status in Minnesota.

 

(f) Statewide Forest Carbon Inventory and Change Mapping

 

 

 

 

$987,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to work with Minnesota Forest Resources Council, Minnesota Forestry Association, the Board of Water and Soil Resources, and the University of Minnesota to develop a programmatic approach and begin collecting plot-based inventories on private forestland for use with remote sensing data to better assess changing forest conditions and climate mitigation opportunities across all ownerships in the state.


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(g) Predicting the Future of Aquatic Species by Understanding the Past

 

 

 

 

$170,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to use past and present information to model future ranges of native aquatic species in Minnesota to generate publicly available tools for species and habitat management.

 

(h) Assessing Status of Common Tern Populations in Minnesota

 

 

 

 

$199,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the Natural Resources Research Institute in Duluth to assess the population status of Common Tern breeding colonies in Minnesota, implement management activities, and develop a standardized monitoring protocol and online database for accessing current and historic monitoring data to help prioritize conservation and restoration actions for this state-threatened species.

 

(i) Salvaged Wildlife to Inform Environmental Health, Ecology, and Education

 

 

 

 

$486,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota, Bell Museum of Natural History, to establish a statewide network to collect, analyze, and archive salvaged dead wildlife and build a foundation of biodiversity resources to track ecosystem-wide changes, monitor environmental health, and educate Minnesotans about the value of scientific specimens.

 

(j) Developing Conservation Priorities for Rare and Specialist Bees

 

 

 

 

$619,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to collect data on rare and specialist bees and their habitat preferences, determine their conservation status, and develop strategies to improve their chances of survival.

 

(k) Efficacy of Urban Archery Hunting to Manage Deer

 

 

 

 

 

$393,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Trustees of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities for Bemidji State University to conduct an analysis of deer survival, habitat use, and hunter data in the city of Bemidji to improve special archery hunt management practices in urban areas of the state.

 

(l) Mapping the Ecology of Urban and Rural Canids

 

 

 

 

 

$601,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to determine how disease prevalence, diet, habitat use, and interspecies interactions of coyotes and foxes change from urban to rural areas along the Mississippi River corridor.


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(m) Maximizing Lowland Conifer Ecosystem Services - Phase II

 

 

 

 

$482,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to continue monitoring forested peatland hydrology and wildlife, conduct new wildlife and habitat surveys, and quantify carbon storage to provide support for management decisions.

 

(n) Modernizing Minnesota's Wildlife (and Plant) Action Plan

 

 

 

 

$889,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to modernize the Minnesota Wildlife Action Plan by filling critical data gaps, including adding rare plants to the plan, and standardizing conservation status assessment methods to ensure Minnesota's natural heritage is protected into the future.

 

(o) Linking Breeding and Migratory Bird Populations in Minnesota

 

 

 

 

$199,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Hawk Ridge Bird Observatory to map year-round habitat use of understudied bird species of special conservation concern and evaluate areas with the greatest risk of contaminant exposure.

 

(p) Old Growth Forest Monitoring

 

 

 

 

 

$441,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to establish baseline conditions and develop a cost-effective method to monitor approximately 93,000 acres of old growth forest in Minnesota to ensure that these rare and important forest resources are properly protected.

 

(q) Integrating Remotely Sensed Data with Traditional Forest Inventory

 

 

 

 

$191,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the Natural Resources Research Institute in Duluth to calibrate and optimize the use of LiDAR for forest inventory purposes and estimate stand-level forest resource metrics in northeastern Minnesota so ecosystem services can be better considered in management decisions.

 

(r) Community Response Monitoring for Adaptive Management in Southeast Minnesota

 

 

 

 

$483,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with The Nature Conservancy to assess community-level plant and animal responses to past restoration efforts in select southeast Minnesota conservation focus areas to determine if management outcomes are being achieved.


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(s) Minnesota Biodiversity Atlas - Phase III

 

 

 

 

 

$797,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota, Bell Museum of Natural History, to expand the Minnesota Biodiversity Atlas to include more than 2,000,000 records and images of Minnesota wildlife, plants, and fungi by adding insect specimens, collections from new partners, historical data, and repatriating records of Minnesota's biodiversity that exist in various federal institutions.

 

      Subd. 4.  Water Resources

 

8,328,000

 

-0-

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

Environment and

 Natural Resources

 Trust Fund

8,139,000

-0-

Great Lakes Protection

 Account

189,000

-0-

 

(a) Ditching Delinquent Ditches:  Optimizing Wetland Restoration

 

 

 

 

$199,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to use new techniques to identify and rank areas statewide where targeted removal of poorly functioning drainage ditches and restoration to wetlands can provide maximum human and ecological benefits, including aquifer recharge and flood prevention.

 

(b) Assessment of Red River Basin Project Outcomes

 

 

 

 

 

$920,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Red River Watershed Management Board acting as fiscal agent for the Red River Basin Flood Damage Reduction Work Group to plan and implement multiresource monitoring at flood damage reduction and natural resource enhancement projects across the Red River Basin to evaluate outcomes and improve design of future projects at a regional scale.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2028, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered.

 

(c) Wind Wave and Boating Impacts on Inland Lakes

 

 

 

 

 

$415,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory to conduct a field study to measure the impacts of boat propeller wash and boat wakes on lake bottoms, shorelines, and water quality compared to the impacts of wind-generated waves.


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(d) Finding, Capturing, and Destroying PFAS in Minnesota Waters

 

 

 

 

$478,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to develop novel methods for the detection, sequestration, and degradation of poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in Minnesota's lakes and rivers.

 

(e) Sinking and Suspended Microplastic Particles in Lake Superior

 

 

 

 

$412,000 the first year is to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the Large Lakes Observatory in Duluth to investigate the abundance, characteristics, and fate of microplastic particles in Lake Superior to inform remediation strategies and analyses of environmental impacts.  Of this amount, $189,000 is from the Great Lakes protection account and $223,000 is from the trust fund.  These appropriations may also be used to educate the public about the research conducted with this appropriation.

 

(f) Ecotoxicological Impacts of Quinone Outside Inhibitor (QoI) Fungicides

 

 

 

 

$279,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the University of St. Thomas to assess the ecological hazards associated with QoI fungicides and their major environmental transformation products.

 

(g) Brightsdale Dam Channel Restoration

 

 

 

 

 

$1,004,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Fillmore County Soil and Water Conservation District to reduce sedimentation and improve aquatic habitat by restoring a channel of the north branch of the Root River at the site of a failed hydroelectric power dam that was removed in 2003.

 

(h) Mapping Aquifer Recharge Potential

 

 

 

 

 

$391,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory to partner with the Freshwater Society to develop a practical tool for mapping aquifer recharge potential, demonstrate the tool with laboratory and field tests, use the tool to evaluate recharge potential of several aquifers in Minnesota, and analyze aquifer recharge policy.

 

(i) ALASD's Chloride Source Reduction Pilot Program

 

 

 

 

 

$764,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Alexandria Lake Area Sanitary District (ALASD) to coordinate with Douglas County and the Pollution Control Agency to pilot an incentive program for


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3823

residences and businesses to install high-efficiency water softeners, salt-free systems, or softener discharge disposal systems to reduce the annual salt load to Lake Winona and downstream waters.  The pilot program includes rebates, inspections, community education, and water quality monitoring to measure chloride reduction success.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered.

 

(j) Removing CECs from Stormwater with Biofiltration

 

 

 

 

 

$641,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory to develop a treatment practice design using biofiltration media to remove contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) from stormwater runoff and to provide statewide stormwater management guidance.

 

(k) Didymo II The North Shore Threat Continues

 

 

 

 

 

$394,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Science Museum of Minnesota for the St. Croix Watershed Research Station to identify North Shore streams with didymo, determine the risk of invasion to other streams, document didymo impacts to stream functioning, and develop strategies to prevent further spread of didymo.

 

(l) Leveraging Data Analytics Innovations for Watershed District Planning

 

 

 

 

$738,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Minnehaha Creek Watershed District to integrate local and statewide data sets into a high-resolution planning tool that forecasts the impacts of changing precipitation patterns and quantitatively compares cost effectiveness and outcomes for water quality, ecological integrity, and flood prevention projects in the district.  Minnehaha Creek Watershed District may license third parties to use products developed with this appropriation without further approval from the legislature or the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources, provided the licensing does not generate income.  This appropriation is subject to Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.10.

 

(m) Protecting Water in the Central Sands Region of the Mississippi River Headwaters

 

 

 

 

$1,693,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the White Earth Band of Minnesota Chippewa Indians to conduct a policy analysis and assess aggregate irrigation impacts on water quality and quantity in the Pineland Sands region of the state.


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           Subd. 5.  Environmental Education

 

3,905,000

 

-0-

 

(a) Fostering Conservation by Connecting Students to the BWCA

 

 

 

 

$1,080,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Friends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness to connect Minnesota youth to the Boundary Waters through environmental education, experiential learning, and wilderness canoe trips.

 

(b) Statewide Environmental Education via PBS Outdoor Series

 

 

 

 

$391,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Pioneer Public Broadcasting Service to produce new episodes of a statewide public television series and an educational web page designed to inspire Minnesotans to connect with the outdoors and to restore and protect the state's natural resources.

 

(c) Increasing Diversity in Environmental Careers

 

 

 

 

 

$763,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources in cooperation with Conservation Corps Minnesota and Iowa to ensure a stable and prepared natural resources work force in Minnesota by encouraging a diversity of students to pursue careers in environment and natural resources through internships, mentorships, and fellowships with the Department of Natural Resources, the Board of Water and Soil Resources, and the Pollution Control Agency.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2028, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered.

 

(d) Reducing Biophobia & Fostering Environmental Stewardship in Underserved Schools

 

 

 

 

$180,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the Raptor Center to foster long-lasting environmental stewardship and literacy in Minnesota youth in underserved schools by providing engaging, multiunit, standards-based environmental programming featuring positive interactions with raptors and evaluating program effectiveness and areas for improvement.

 

(e) Sharing Minnesota's Biggest Environmental Investment

 

 

 

 

$628,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Science Museum of Minnesota, in coordination with the Legislative‑Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources (LCCMR), to increase public access to the results of LCCMR‑recommended research, including through a free online interactive map, in-depth videos, and public events.


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(f) North Shore Private Forestry Outreach and Implementation

 

 

 

 

$375,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Sugarloaf:  The North Shore Stewardship Association to conduct outreach to private forest landowners, develop site restoration plans, and connect landowners with restoration assistance to encourage private forest restoration and improve the ecological health of Minnesota's North Shore forest landscape.

 

(g) Teaching Students about Watersheds through Outdoor Science

 

 

 

 

$290,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Minnesota Trout Unlimited to engage students in classroom and outdoor hands-on learning focused on water quality, groundwater, aquatic life, and watershed stewardship and provide youth and their families with fishing experiences to further foster a conservation ethic.

 

(h) Bioblitz Urban Parks:  Engaging Communities in Scientific Efforts

 

 

 

 

$198,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board to work with volunteers to collect baseline biodiversity data for neighborhood and regional parks to inspire stewardship and inform habitat restoration work.

 

      Subd. 6.  Aquatic and Terrestrial Invasive Species

 

5,104,000

 

-0-

 

(a) Northward Expansion of Ecologically Damaging Amphibians and Reptiles

 

 

 

 

$163,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to assess the distribution and potential for expansion of key detrimental and nonnative amphibians and reptiles in Minnesota.

 

(b) Developing Research-Based Solutions to Minnesota's AIS Problems

 

 

 

 

$4,941,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota for the Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center to conduct high-priority projects aimed at solving Minnesota's aquatic invasive species problems using rigorous science and a collaborative process.  Additionally, funds may be spent to deliver research findings to end users through strategic communication and outreach.  This appropriation is subject to Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.10.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered.


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           Subd. 7.  Air Quality, Climate Change, and Renewable Energy

3,913,000

 

-0-

 

(a) Community Forestry AmeriCorps

 

 

 

 

 

$1,500,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with ServeMinnesota to preserve and increase tree canopy throughout the state by training, supporting, and deploying AmeriCorps members to local agencies and nonprofit organizations to plant and inventory trees, develop and implement pest management plans, create and maintain nursery beds for replacement trees, and organize opportunities for community engagement in tree stewardship activities.

 

(b) Biochar Implementation in Habitat Restoration:  A Pilot

 

 

 

 

$185,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Great River Greening to pilot the use of portable biochar kilns as an alternative to open-pile burning of trees and shrubs to reduce smoke and carbon emissions and produce beneficial by-products from invasive species removal and land restoration efforts.

 

(c) Completing Installment of the Minnesota Ecological Monitoring Network

 

 

 

 

$1,094,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to improve conservation and management of Minnesota's native forests, wetlands, and grasslands by completing the Ecological Monitoring Network to measure ecosystems' change through time.

 

(d) Lichens as Low-Cost Air Quality Monitors in Minnesota

 

 

 

 

$341,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to develop community science protocols for using lichens as indicators of air quality and conduct an analysis of air pollution changes across Minnesota in the present and in the past century.

 

(e) Environment-Friendly Decarbonizing of Steel Production with Hydrogen Plasma

 

 

 

 

$739,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to investigate the use of microwave hydrogen plasma to reduce fossil fuel use, carbon dioxide emissions, and waste and enable the use of alternative iron resources, including lower quality iron ores, tailings, and iron ore waste piles, in the iron-making industry.  This appropriation is subject to Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.10.


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(f) Economic Analysis Guide for Minnesota Climate Investments

 

 

 

 

$54,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency to create a guide that will incorporate nation-wide best practices for considering costs, benefits, economics, and equity in Minnesota climate policy decisions.

 

      Subd. 8.  Methods to Protect or Restore Land, Water, and Habitat

15,997,000

 

-0-

 

(a) Minnesota Bee and Beneficial Species Habitat Enhancement II

 

 

 

 

$876,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Pheasants Forever Inc. to enhance grassland habitats to benefit pollinators and other wildlife species on permanently protected lands and to collaborate with the University of Minnesota to determine best practices for seeding timing and techniques.

 

(b) Karner Blue Butterfly Insurance Population Establishment in Minnesota

 

 

 

 

$405,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Three Rivers Park District to establish a breeding population of the federally endangered Karner blue butterfly on protected lands within the butterfly's northern expanding range, increase the habitat area, and evaluate the butterfly establishment effort to assist with adaptive management.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered.

 

(c) Root River Habitat Restoration at Eagle Bluff

 

 

 

 

 

$866,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center to restore habitat in and alongside the Root River north of Lanesboro, Minnesota, and to conduct monitoring to ensure water quality and fish population improvements are achieved.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2028, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered.

 

(d) Restoring Mussels in Streams and Lakes - Continuation

 

 

 

 

$825,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to propagate, rear, and restore native freshwater mussel assemblages and the ecosystem services they


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provide in the Mississippi, Cedar, and Cannon Rivers; to evaluate reintroduction success; and to inform the public on mussels and mussel conservation.

 

(e) Minnesota Million:  Seedlings for Reforestation and CO 2 Sequestration

 

 

 

 

$906,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota, Duluth, to collaborate with The Nature Conservancy and Minnesota Extension to expand networks of seed collectors and tree growers and to research tree planting strategies to accelerate reforestation for carbon sequestration, wildlife habitat, and watershed resilience.

 

(f) Panoway on Wayzata Bay Shoreline Restoration Project

 

 

 

 

$200,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Wayzata to restore native lake bottom and shoreline vegetation to improve shoreline stability, wildlife habitat, and the natural beauty of Lake Minnetonka's Wayzata Bay.  The recipient must report to the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources on the effectiveness of any new methods tested while conducting the project and may use a portion of the appropriation to prepare that report.

 

(g) Pollinator Central III:  Habitat Improvement with Community Monitoring

 

 

 

 

$190,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Great River Greening to restore and enhance pollinator habitat in parks, schools, and other public spaces to benefit pollinators and people and to build knowledge about impacts of the pollinator plantings through community-based monitoring.

 

(h) Restoring Forests and Savannas Using Silvopasture ‑ Phase II

 

 

 

 

$674,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Great River Greening to continue to partner with the University of Minnesota and the Sustainable Farming Association to demonstrate, evaluate, and increase adoption of the combined use of intensive tree, forage, and grazing as a method to restore and manage forest and savanna habitats.

 

(i) Minnesota Community Schoolyards

 

 

 

 

 

$1,433,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with The Trust for Public Land to engage students and communities to create nature-focused habitat improvements at schoolyards across the state to increase environmental outcomes and encourage outdoor learning.


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(j) Pollinator Enhancement and Mississippi River Shoreline Restoration

 

 

 

 

$187,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the adjutant general of the Department of Military Affairs to restore native prairie, support pollinator plantings, and stabilize a large section of stream bank along the Mississippi River within Camp Ripley.

 

(k) Conservation Cooperative for Working Lands

 

 

 

 

 

$2,611,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Pheasants Forever Inc. to collaborate with Natural Resources Conservation Service, Board of Water and Soil Resources, and Minnesota Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts to accelerate adoption of voluntary conservation practices on working lands in Minnesota by increasing technical assistance to farmers and landowners while also attracting federal matching funds.

 

(l) Quantifying Environmental Benefits of Peatland Restoration in Minnesota

 

 

 

 

$754,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota to quantify the capacity of restored peatlands to store and accumulate atmospheric carbon and prevent release of accumulated mercury into the surrounding environment.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered.

 

(m) Renewing Access to an Iconic North Shore Vista

 

 

 

 

 

$197,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Superior Hiking Trail Association to use national trail design best practices to renew trails and a campground along the Bean and Bear Lakes section of the Superior Hiking Trail that provides access to one of Minnesota's most iconic vistas.

 

(n) Addressing Erosion Along High Use River Loops

 

 

 

 

 

$368,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Superior Hiking Trail Association to rehabilitate and renew popular river loops of the Superior Hiking Trail to withstand high visitor use and serve Minnesotans for years to come.

 

(o) Pollinator Habitat Creation at Minnesota Closed Landfills

 

 

 

 

$1,508,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency to conduct a pilot project to create pollinator habitat at closed landfill sites in the


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closed landfill program.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered.

 

(p) Enhancing Habitat Connectivity within the Urban Mississippi Flyway

 

 

 

 

$190,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board to enhance and restore habitat in and between urban neighborhood parks and the Mississippi River to benefit animals, plants, and neighborhoods traditionally disconnected from nature and to raise awareness of the Mississippi River Flyway.

 

(q) Statewide Diversion of Furniture and Mattress Waste Pilots

 

 

 

 

$2,833,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with EMERGE Community Development to work collaboratively with the University of Minnesota, Second Chance Recycling, and local governments to test and implement methods to expand mattress and furniture recycling statewide, including by researching value-add commodity markets for recycled materials, piloting mattress collection in greater Minnesota counties, piloting curbside furniture collection in the metropolitan area, and increasing facility capacity to recycle collected mattresses.  Any revenue generated from selling products or assets developed or acquired with this appropriation must be repaid to the trust fund unless a plan is approved for reinvestment of income in the project.  This appropriation is subject to Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.10.

 

(r) Phelps Mill Wetland and Prairie Restoration

 

 

 

 

 

$974,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Otter Tail County to plan, engineer, and restore wetlands and prairie within the newly expanded Phelps Mill County Park to improve habitat connectivity for wildlife and enhance recreational experiences for users.  Up to $322,000 of this appropriation may be used to plan, engineer, and construct a boardwalk, viewing platforms, and soft trails within the park.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered.

 

      Subd. 9.  Land Acquisition, Habitat, and Recreation

 

31,241,000

 

-0-

 

(a) SNA Stewardship, Outreach, and Biodiversity Protection

 

 

 

 

$1,919,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to restore and enhance exceptional habitat on scientific and natural areas (SNAs), increase public involvement


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and outreach, and strategically acquire lands that meet criteria for SNAs under Minnesota Statutes, section 86A.05, from willing sellers.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered.

 

(b) Wannigan Regional Park Land Acquisition

 

 

 

 

 

$727,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Frazee to acquire land for protecting and enhancing natural resources and for future development as Wannigan Regional Park, where the Heartland State, North Country National, and Otter Tail River Water Trails will meet.  Initial site development or restoration work may be conducted with this appropriation.

 

(c) Local Parks, Trails, and Natural Areas Grant Programs

 

 

 

 

$3,802,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to solicit and rank applications and fund competitive matching grants for local parks, trail connections, and natural and scenic areas under Minnesota Statutes, section 85.019.  This appropriation is for local nature-based recreation, connections to regional and state natural areas, and recreation facilities and may not be used for athletic facilities such as sport fields, courts, and playgrounds.

 

(d) Outreach and Stewardship Through the Native Prairie Bank Program

 

 

 

 

$620,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to enhance and monitor lands enrolled in the native prairie bank and to provide outreach and technical assistance to landowners, practitioners, and the public to increase awareness and stewardship of the state's remaining native prairie.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered.

 

(e) Minnesota State Trails Development

 

 

 

 

 

$4,952,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to expand recreational opportunities on Minnesota state trails by rehabilitating and enhancing existing state trails and replacing or repairing existing state trail bridges.

 

(f) Construction of East Park

 

 

 

 

 

$700,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of St. Joseph to increase recreational opportunities and access at East Park along the Sauk River in St. Joseph through enhancements such as a canoe and kayak access, a floating dock, paved and mowed trails, and parking entrance improvements.


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(g) Scandia Gateway Trail to William O'Brien State Park

 

 

 

 

 

$2,689,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Scandia to engineer and construct a segment of the Gateway State Trail between the city of Scandia and William O'Brien State Park that will be maintained by the Department of Natural Resources.  The segment to be constructed includes a pedestrian tunnel and trailhead parking area.  This project must be designed and constructed in accordance with Department of Natural Resources state trail standards.  Engineering and construction plans must be approved by the commissioner of natural resources before construction may commence.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered.

 

(h) Grand Marais Mountain Bike Trail Rehabilitation - Phase II

 

 

 

 

$200,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Superior Cycling Association to rehabilitate and modify existing mountain bike trails at Pincushion Mountain to increase the trail's environmental sustainability and provide better access to beginner and adaptive cyclers.

 

(i) Acquisition of State Parks and Trails Inholdings

 

 

 

 

 

$5,425,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources to acquire high-priority inholdings from willing sellers within the legislatively authorized boundaries of state parks, recreation areas, and trails to protect Minnesota's natural heritage, enhance outdoor recreation, and improve the efficiency of public land management.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027, by which time the project must be completed and final products delivered.

 

(j) St. Louis River Re-Connect - Phase II

 

 

 

 

 

$1,375,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Duluth to increase recreational opportunities and access to the Waabizheshikana hiking and water trails in West Duluth with trail and trailhead enhancements such as accessible canoe and kayak launches, picnic areas, and restrooms; restored habitat; stormwater improvements; directional signage, and trailside interpretation.  This appropriation may also be used to partner with the St. Louis River Alliance to create an ambassadors program to engage the surrounding community and facilitate use of the trails.

 

(k) City of Biwabik Recreation

 

 

 

 

 

$1,306,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Biwabik to reconstruct and renovate Biwabik Recreation Area's access road, parking area, and bathroom facilities.


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(l) Silver Bay Multimodal Trailhead Project

 

 

 

 

 

$1,970,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Silver Bay to develop a multimodal trailhead center to provide safe access to the Superior Hiking, Gitchi-Gami Bike, and C.J. Ramstad/North Shore trails; Black Beach Park; and other recreational destinations.  Before any construction costs are incurred, the city must demonstrate that all funding to complete the project are secured.

 

(m) Above the Falls Regional Park Restoration Planning and Acquisition

 

 

 

 

$1,376,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board to acquire land along the Mississippi River from willing sellers for habitat restoration, trail development, and low-intensity recreational facilities in Above the Falls Regional Park.  This appropriation may also be used to prepare restoration plans for lands acquired.  This appropriation may not be used to purchase habitable residential structures.  Before the acquisition, a phase 1 environmental assessment must be completed and the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board must not accept any liability for previous contamination of lands acquired with this appropriation.

 

(n) Redhead Mountain Bike Park

 

 

 

 

 

$1,666,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with the city of Chisholm as the fiscal agent for the Minnesota Discovery Center to enhance outdoor recreational opportunities by adding trails and amenities to the Redhead Mountain Bike Park in Chisholm.  Amenities may include such things as pump tracks, skills courses, changing stations, shade shakes, and signage.

 

(o) Maplewood State Park Trail Segment of the Perham to Pelican Rapids Regional Trail

 

 

 

 

$2,514,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources for an agreement with Otter Tail County to partner with the Department of Natural Resources to construct the Maplewood State Park segment of the Perham to Pelican Rapids Regional Trail.  This project must be designed and constructed in accordance with Department of Natural Resources state trail standards.  Engineering and construction plans must be approved by the commissioner of natural resources before construction may commence.

 

      Subd. 10.  Administration, Emerging Issues, and Contract Agreement Reimbursement

3,126,000

 

-0-

 

(a) LCCMR Administrative Budget

 

 

 

 

 

$2,133,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Legislative‑Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources for


Journal of the House - 47th Day - Wednesday, April 12, 2023 - Top of Page 3834

administration in fiscal years 2024 and 2025 as provided in Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.09, subdivision 5.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2025.  Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.11, paragraph (b), Minnesota Statutes, section 16A.281, applies to this appropriation.

 

(b) Emerging Issues

 

 

 

 

 

$767,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the Legislative‑Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources to an emerging issues account authorized in Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.08, subdivision 4, paragraph (d).

 

(c) Contract Agreement Reimbursement

 

 

 

 

 

$224,000 the first year is from the trust fund to the commissioner of natural resources, at the direction of the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources, for expenses incurred in preparing and administering contracts, including for the agreements specified in this section.