Journal of the House - 70th Day - Monday, May 15, 2023 - Top of Page 7613

 

 

STATE OF MINNESOTA

 

 

NINETY-THIRD SESSION - 2023

 

_____________________

 

SEVENTIETH DAY

 

Saint Paul, Minnesota, Monday, May 15, 2023

 

 

      The House of Representatives convened at 10:00 a.m. and was called to order by Dan Wolgamott, Speaker pro tempore.

 

      Prayer was offered by Pastor Jacob Holck, Sauk Centre United Methodist Church, Sauk Centre, Minnesota.

 

      The members of the House gave the pledge of allegiance to the flag of the United States of America.

 

      The roll was called and the following members were present:

 


Acomb

Agbaje

Altendorf

Anderson, P. E.

Backer

Bahner

Bakeberg

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Berg

Bierman

Bliss

Brand

Burkel

Carroll

Cha

Clardy

Coulter

Curran

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Davis

Demuth

Dotseth

Edelson

Elkins

Engen

Feist

Finke

Fischer

Fogelman

Franson

Frazier

Frederick

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gillman

Gomez

Greenman

Grossell

Hansen, R.

Hanson, J.

Harder

Hassan

Heintzeman

Hemmingsen-Jaeger

Her

Hicks

Hill

Hollins

Hornstein

Howard

Hudella

Hudson

Huot

Hussein

Igo

Jacob

Johnson

Jordan

Joy

Keeler

Klevorn

Knudsen

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Kozlowski

Koznick

Kraft

Kresha

Lee, F.

Lee, K.

Liebling

Lillie

Lislegard

Long

McDonald

Mekeland

Moller

Mueller

Murphy

Myers

Nadeau

Nash

Nelson, M.

Nelson, N.

Neu Brindley

Newton

Niska

Noor

Norris

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson, B.

Olson, L.

O'Neill

Pelowski

Pérez-Vega

Perryman

Petersburg

Pfarr

Pinto

Pryor

Pursell

Quam

Rehm

Reyer

Richardson

Robbins

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Sencer-Mura

Skraba

Smith

Stephenson

Swedzinski

Tabke

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

West

Wiener

Wiens

Witte

Wolgamott

Xiong

Youakim

Zeleznikar

Spk. Hortman


 

      A quorum was present.

 

      Anderson, P. H., and Kiel were excused.

 

      The Chief Clerk proceeded to read the Journal of the preceding day.  There being no objection, further reading of the Journal was dispensed with and the Journal was approved as corrected by the Chief Clerk.


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MESSAGES FROM THE SENATE

 

 

      The following message was received from the Senate:

 

 

Madam Speaker:

 

      I hereby announce the passage by the Senate of the following Senate File, herewith transmitted:

 

      S. F. No. 1335.

 

Thomas S. Bottern, Secretary of the Senate

 

 

FIRST READING OF SENATE BILLS

 

 

S. F. No. 1335, A bill for an act relating to public safety; making policy changes related to State Patrol duties, including school bus inspections, commercial vehicle inspections, and rearview mirror requirements; establishing a penalty; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 160.27, subdivision 7, by adding a subdivision; 161.082, subdivision 2a; 161.115, subdivision 265, by adding a subdivision; 161.125, subdivision 1; 161.32, subdivision 2; 161.41; 162.07, subdivision 2; 162.13, subdivisions 2, 3; 168.1235, subdivision 1; 168.1253, subdivision 3; 168.1293, by adding a subdivision; 168.185; 168.27, subdivisions 11, 16; 168A.11, subdivision 3; 168A.151, subdivision 1; 168B.045; 168B.07, subdivision 1; 169.011, by adding a subdivision; 169.09, subdivision 8; 169.14, by adding a subdivision; 169.346, subdivision 2a; 169.451, subdivisions 2, 3, 4; 169.454, subdivision 2; 169.70; 169.781, subdivision 3; 169A.60, subdivision 13; 171.041; 171.06, subdivision 3, as amended; 171.0605, subdivisions 3, 5; 171.12, by adding a subdivision; 171.306, subdivision 4; 174.38, subdivision 5; 174.40, subdivision 4a; 174.50, subdivision 7; 174.52, subdivisions 2, 4, 5; 222.50, subdivision 7; 325F.6641, subdivision 2; 360.55, subdivision 9; 360.59, subdivision 10; 473.375, by adding a subdivision; 473.408, by adding a subdivision; 609.50, subdivision 1; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 161; 174; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 160.05, subdivision 2; 171.06, subdivision 3a; 473.1467; 473.408, subdivisions 6, 7, 8, 9; Laws 2002, chapter 393, section 85; Minnesota Rules, part 8835.0350, subpart 2.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.

 

 

      Long moved that the House recess subject to the call of the Chair.  The motion prevailed.

 

 

RECESS

 

 

RECONVENED

 

      The House reconvened and was called to order by Speaker pro tempore Wolgamott.


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REPORT FROM THE COMMITTEE ON RULES

AND LEGISLATIVE ADMINISTRATION

 

      Long from the Committee on Rules and Legislative Administration, pursuant to rules 1.21 and 3.33, designated the following bill to be placed on the Calendar for the Day for Wednesday, May 17, 2023 and established a prefiling requirement for amendments offered to the following bill:

 

      H. F. No. 2369.

 

 

MOTIONS AND RESOLUTIONS

 

 

SUSPENSION OF RULES

 

      Long moved that Joint Rule 2.06, relating to Conference Committees, be suspended as it relates to H. F. No. 2292.  The motion prevailed. 

 

 

      The following Conference Committee Report was received:

 

 

CONFERENCE COMMITTEE REPORT ON H. F. No. 2292

 

A bill for an act relating to early childhood; modifying provisions for early learning scholarships, Head Start, and early education programs; providing for early childhood educator programs; requiring reports; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 119A.52; 121A.17, subdivision 3; 121A.19; 124D.13, by adding a subdivision; 124D.141, subdivision 2; 124D.162; 124D.165, subdivisions 2, 3, 4, 6; 125A.13; 179A.03, subdivision 18; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 122A.

 

May 15, 2023

The Honorable Melissa Hortman

Speaker of the House of Representatives

 

The Honorable Bobby Joe Champion

President of the Senate

 

We, the undersigned conferees for H. F. No. 2292 report that we have agreed upon the items in dispute and recommend as follows:

 

That the Senate recede from its amendment and that H. F. No. 2292 be further amended as follows:

 

Delete everything after the enacting clause and insert:

 

"Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 119A.52, is amended to read:

 

119A.52 DISTRIBUTION OF APPROPRIATION.

 

(a) The commissioner of education must distribute money appropriated for that purpose to federally designated Head Start programs to expand services and to serve additional low-income children.  Migrant and Indian reservation programs must be initially allocated money based on the programs' share of federal funds., which may


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include costs associated with program operations, infrastructure, or reconfiguration to serve children from birth to age five in center-based services.  The distribution must occur in the following order:  (1) 10.72 percent of the total Head Start appropriation must be initially allocated to federally designated Tribal Head Start programs; (2) the Tribal Head Start portion of the appropriation must be initially allocated to Tribal Head Start programs based on the programs' share of federal funds; and (3) migrant programs must be initially allocated funding based on the programs' share of federal funds.  The remaining money must be initially allocated to the remaining local agencies based equally on the agencies' share of federal funds and on the proportion of eligible children in the agencies' service area who are not currently being served.  A Head Start program must be funded at a per child rate equal to its contracted, federally funded base level at the start of the fiscal year.  For all agencies without a federal Early Head Start rate, the state average federal cost per child for Early Head Start applies.  In allocating funds under this paragraph, the commissioner of education must assure that each Head Start program in existence in 1993 is allocated no less funding in any fiscal year than was allocated to that program in fiscal year 1993.  Before paying money to the programs, the commissioner must notify each program of its initial allocation and how the money must be used.  Each program must present a plan under section 119A.535.  For any program that cannot utilize its full allocation at the beginning of the fiscal year, the commissioner must reduce the allocation proportionately.  Money available after the initial allocations are reduced must be redistributed to eligible programs.

 

(b) The commissioner must develop procedures to make payments to programs based upon the number of children reported to be enrolled during the required time period of program operations.  Enrollment is defined by federal Head Start regulations.  The procedures must include a reporting schedule, corrective action plan requirements, and financial consequences to be imposed on programs that do not meet full enrollment after the period of corrective action.  Programs reporting chronic underenrollment, as defined by the commissioner, will have their subsequent program year allocation reduced proportionately.  Funds made available by prorating payments and allocations to programs with reported underenrollment will be made available to the extent funds exist to fully enrolled Head Start programs through a form and manner prescribed by the department.

 

(c) Programs with approved innovative initiatives that target services to high-risk populations, including homeless families and families living in homeless shelters and transitional housing, are exempt from the procedures in paragraph (b).  This exemption does not apply to entire programs.  The exemption applies only to approved innovative initiatives that target services to high-risk populations, including homeless families and families living in homeless shelters, transitional housing, and permanent supportive housing.

 

Sec. 2.  [119C.01] GREAT START SCHOLARSHIPS PROGRAM.

 

Subdivision 1.  Establishment; purpose.  The commissioner of children, youth, and families, in collaboration with the commissioner of education and the commissioner of human services, shall develop and, to the extent funds are available and notwithstanding federal and state laws to the contrary, implement a plan for the great start scholarships program to ensure affordable access to high-quality early care and learning for children from birth to kindergarten entry.

 

Subd. 2.  Development.  In developing the plan and implementing the program under this section, the commissioner shall:

 

(1) identify ways to integrate the functions, administrative structures, and funding mechanisms of early care and learning programs administered by the state with the great start scholarships program;

 

(2) consider the recommendations made by the Great Start for All Minnesota Children Task Force under Laws 2021, First Special Session chapter 7, article 14, section 18, subdivision 2;


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(3) create a process and timeline to transition the following families to the great start scholarships program by July 1, 2028:

 

(i) families with at least one child receiving an early learning scholarship under section 124D.165; and

 

(ii) families with at least one child who is not yet in kindergarten and is receiving child care assistance under section 119B.03 or 119B.05 for care received from a provider licensed under Minnesota Rules, chapter 9502 or 9503, or Tribally licensed, or a Head Start program that has a rating under section 124D.142;

 

(4) create mechanisms for members of local communities, including families and members of the early care and learning workforce, to have input in decisions regarding needs and preferences for early care and learning options;

 

(5) develop a proposed method for funding early care and learning slots in response to local need through contracts with eligible providers that may be used to deliver services that meet quality and compensation standards with the intent to build early care and learning capacity statewide for children from birth to kindergarten entry; and

 

(6) consider how to maximize available federal resources while maintaining access to child care assistance funding under sections 119B.03 and 119B.05 for school-age children.  The commissioner, in consultation with an appropriate state agency, may seek federal technical assistance or outside consultation as necessary to provide minimally burdensome program access to all participating families.

 

Subd. 3.  Program requirements.  The great start scholarships program must include at a minimum:

 

(1) a method to provide financial assistance to families voluntarily participating in the program;

 

(2) family eligibility for any qualifying family that has at least one child who is not yet in kindergarten;

 

(3) provider eligibility for:

 

(i) any program licensed under Minnesota Rules, chapter 9502 or 9503, or Tribally licensed, that participates in the quality rating and improvement system under section 124D.142; and

 

(ii) any school-based program and Head Start program that has a rating under section 124D.142;

 

(4) a unified, integrated, and simple online application process that utilizes administrative data to ease qualification and benefit determination and meet federal reporting requirements;

 

(5) an electronic attendance tracking system that is integrated, to the extent practicable, and payments system to safeguard program integrity and streamline billing and payment processes for providers; and

 

(6) a schedule for family contributions and provider payments that ensures that no participating family pays more than seven percent of annual income for early care and learning services for children from birth to kindergarten entry.  Family contributions and provider payments may vary by family income, program quality, geography, and need for compensatory services, and may take into consideration the results of the market rate survey under section 119B.02, subdivision 7; information from cost estimation models for providing early care and learning in the state; and cost information gathered through contracts under subdivision 2, clause (5).

 

Subd. 4.  Administration; reporting requirement.  (a) By July 1, 2028, to the extent funding is appropriated and notwithstanding federal and state laws to the contrary, the commissioner shall have in place the administrative structures and systems needed for the great start scholarships program to meet the operational needs of participating families and eligible providers.


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(b) By July 1, 2026, the commissioner, in consultation with the commissioners of education and human services, must submit a report to the legislative committees with jurisdiction over early care and learning on the status of planning for the program under this section.  The report must:

 

(1) include information on progress made and work underway to develop the program;

 

(2) provide details about the administrative structures, systems, and funding needed to meet the needs of families and providers who may participate in the program; and

 

(3) identify any statutory or regulatory changes necessary for implementation of the program.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 121A.17, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Screening program.  (a) A screening program must include at least the following components:  developmental assessments, including virtual developmental screening for families who make the request based on their immunocompromised health status or other health conditions, hearing and vision screening or referral, immunization review and referral, the child's height and weight, the date of the child's most recent comprehensive vision examination, if any, identification of risk factors that may influence learning, an interview with the parent about the child, and referral for assessment, diagnosis, and treatment when potential needs are identified.  The district and the person performing or supervising the screening must provide a parent or guardian with clear written notice that the parent or guardian may decline to answer questions or provide information about family circumstances that might affect development and identification of risk factors that may influence learning.  The notice must state "Early childhood developmental screening helps a school district identify children who may benefit from district and community resources available to help in their development.  Early childhood developmental screening includes a vision screening that helps detect potential eye problems but is not a substitute for a comprehensive eye exam."  The notice must clearly state that declining to answer questions or provide information does not prevent the child from being enrolled in kindergarten or first grade if all other screening components are met.  If a parent or guardian is not able to read and comprehend the written notice, the district and the person performing or supervising the screening must convey the information in another manner.  The notice must also inform the parent or guardian that a child need not submit to the district screening program if the child's health records indicate to the school that the child has received comparable developmental screening performed within the preceding 365 days by a public or private health care organization or individual health care provider.  The notice must be given to a parent or guardian at the time the district initially provides information to the parent or guardian about screening and must be given again at the screening location.

 

(b) All screening components shall be consistent with the standards of the state commissioner of health for early developmental screening programs.  A developmental screening program must not provide laboratory tests or a physical examination to any child.  The district must request from the public or private health care organization or the individual health care provider the results of any laboratory test or physical examination within the 12 months preceding a child's scheduled screening.  For the purposes of this section, "comprehensive vision examination" means a vision examination performed by an optometrist or ophthalmologist.

 

(c) If a child is without health coverage, the school district must refer the child to an appropriate health care provider.

 

(d) A board may offer additional components such as nutritional, physical and dental assessments, review of family circumstances that might affect development, blood pressure, laboratory tests, and health history.

 

(e) If a statement signed by the child's parent or guardian is submitted to the administrator or other person having general control and supervision of the school that the child has not been screened because of conscientiously held beliefs of the parent or guardian, the screening is not required.


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Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 121A.19, is amended to read:

 

121A.19 DEVELOPMENTAL SCREENING AID.

 

Each school year, the state must pay a district for each child or student screened by the district according to the requirements of section 121A.17.  The amount of state aid for each child or student screened shall be:  (1) $75 $98 for a child screened at age three; (2) $50 $65 for a child screened at age four; (3) $40 $52 for a child screened at age five or six prior to kindergarten; and (4) $30 $39 for a student screened within 30 days after first enrolling in a public school kindergarten if the student has not previously been screened according to the requirements of section 121A.17.  If this amount of aid is insufficient, the district may permanently transfer from the general fund an amount that, when added to the aid, is sufficient.  Developmental screening aid shall not be paid for any student who is screened more than 30 days after the first day of attendance at a public school kindergarten, except if a student transfers to another public school kindergarten within 30 days after first enrolling in a Minnesota public school kindergarten program.  In this case, if the student has not been screened, the district to which the student transfers may receive developmental screening aid for screening that student when the screening is performed within 30 days of the transfer date.

 

Sec. 5.  [122A.261] PREKINDERGARTEN, SCHOOL READINESS, PRESCHOOL, AND EARLY EDUCATION PROGRAMS; LICENSURE REQUIREMENT.

 

Subdivision 1.  Licensure requirement.  (a) A school district or charter school must employ a qualified teacher, as defined in section 122A.16, to provide instruction in a preschool, school readiness, school readiness plus, or prekindergarten program or other school district or charter school-based early education program.

 

(b) This subdivision does not apply to individuals providing instruction in a child care center licensed under Minnesota Rules, chapter 9503, or in a certified license-exempt child care center under chapter 245H.

 

Subd. 2.  Exemptions.  Any teacher who has taught in a preschool, school readiness, school readiness plus, or prekindergarten program, or other early learning program for at least five years prior to September 1, 2028, may continue to teach without obtaining a license.  Notwithstanding this exemption from the licensure requirement, these individuals are teachers under section 179A.03, subdivision 18.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective July 1, 2028.

 

Sec. 6.  [122A.731] GRANTS FOR GROW YOUR OWN EARLY CHILDHOOD AND FAMILY EDUCATOR PROGRAMS.

 

Subdivision 1.  Establishment.  The commissioner of education must award grants for Grow Your Own Early Childhood Educator programs established under this section in order to develop an early childhood education workforce that more closely reflects the state's increasingly diverse student population and ensures all students have equitable access to high-quality early educators. 

 

Subd. 2.  Grow Your Own Early Childhood and Family Educator programs.  (a) Minnesota-licensed family child care or licensed center-based child care programs, school district or charter school early learning programs, Head Start programs, institutions of higher education, and other community partnership nongovernmental organizations may apply for a grant to host, build, or expand an early childhood educator preparation program that leads to an individual earning the credential or degree needed to enter or advance in the early childhood education workforce.  Examples include programs that help interested individuals earn the child development associate (CDA) credential, an associate's degree in child development, or a bachelor's degree in early childhood and family education studies or early childhood licensures.  The grant recipient must use at least 80 percent of grant money for student stipends, tuition scholarships, or unique student teaching or field placement experiences.


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(b) Programs providing financial support to interested individuals may require a commitment from the individuals awarded, as determined by the commissioner, to teach in the program or school for a reasonable amount of time that does not exceed one year.

 

Subd. 3.  Grant procedure.  (a) Eligible programs must apply for a grant under this section in the form and manner specified by the commissioner.  To the extent that there are sufficient applications, the commissioner must, to the extent practicable, award an equal number of grants between applicants in greater Minnesota and those in the metropolitan area.

 

(b) For the 2023-2024 school year and later, grant applications for new and existing programs must be received by the commissioner no later than January 15 of the year prior to the school year in which the grant will be used.  The commissioner must review all applications and notify grant recipients by March 15 or as soon as practicable of the anticipated amount awarded.  If the commissioner determines that sufficient funding is unavailable for the grants, the commissioner must notify grant applicants by June 30 or as soon as practicable that there is insufficient money.

 

Subd. 4.  Grow Your Own Early Childhood Education program account.  (a) The Grow Your Own Early Childhood Education program account is established in the special revenue fund.

 

(b) Money appropriated for the Grow Your Own Early Childhood Education program under this section must be transferred to the Grow Your Own Early Childhood Education program account in the special revenue fund.

 

(c) Money in the account is annually appropriated to the commissioner for the Grow Your Own Early Childhood Education program under this section.  Any returned money is available to be regranted.  Grant recipients may apply to use grant money over a period of up to 60 months.

 

(d) Up to $175,000 annually is appropriated to the commissioner for costs associated with administering and monitoring the program under this section.

 

Subd. 5.  Report.  Grant recipients must annually report to the commissioner in the form and manner determined by the commissioner on their activities under this section, including the number of educators supported through grant money and the number of educators obtaining credentials by type.  Data must indicate the beginning level of education and ending level of education of individual participants and an assessment of program effectiveness, including participant feedback, areas for improvement, and employment changes and current employment status, where applicable, after completing preparation programs.  The commissioner must publish a report for the public that summarizes the activities and outcomes of grant recipients and what was done to promote sharing of effective practices among grant recipients and potential grant applicants.

 

Sec. 7.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 124D.13, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 12a.  Support staff.  (a) The department must employ two full-time equivalent staff to serve as resources for programs described in this section.  The staff persons must provide operational support and guidance to programs, including but not limited to providing professional development and education support, assisting with marketing and outreach, and facilitating collaborations with public and private organizations serving families.

 

(b) Each staff person described in this subdivision must hold a valid license as a teacher of parent and family education.

 

Sec. 8.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 124D.141, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Additional duties.  The following duties are added to those assigned to the council under federal law:

 

(1) make recommendations on the most efficient and effective way to leverage state and federal funding streams for early childhood and child care programs;


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(2) make recommendations on how to coordinate or colocate early childhood and child care programs in one state Office of Early Learning.  The council shall establish a task force to develop these recommendations.  The task force shall include two nonexecutive branch or nonlegislative branch representatives from the council; six representatives from the early childhood caucus; two representatives each from the Departments of Education, Human Services, and Health; one representative each from a local public health agency, a local county human services agency, and a school district; and two representatives from the private nonprofit organizations that support early childhood programs in Minnesota.  In developing recommendations in coordination with existing efforts of the council, the task force shall consider how to:

 

(i) consolidate and coordinate resources and public funding streams for early childhood education and child care, and ensure the accountability and coordinated development of all early childhood education and child care services to children from birth to kindergarten entrance;

 

(ii) create a seamless transition from early childhood programs to kindergarten;

 

(iii) encourage family choice by ensuring a mixed system of high-quality public and private programs, with local points of entry, staffed by well-qualified professionals;

 

(iv) ensure parents a decisive role in the planning, operation, and evaluation of programs that aid families in the care of children;

 

(v) provide consumer education and accessibility to early childhood education and child care resources;

 

(vi) advance the quality of early childhood education and child care programs in order to support the healthy development of children and preparation for their success in school;

 

(vii) develop a seamless service delivery system with local points of entry for early childhood education and child care programs administered by local, state, and federal agencies;

 

(viii) ensure effective collaboration between state and local child welfare programs and early childhood mental health programs and the Office of Early Learning;

 

(ix) develop and manage an effective data collection system to support the necessary functions of a coordinated system of early childhood education and child care in order to enable accurate evaluation of its impact;

 

(x) respect and be sensitive to family values and cultural heritage; and

 

(xi) establish the administrative framework for and promote the development of early childhood education and child care services in order to provide that these services, staffed by well-qualified professionals, are available in every community for all families that express a need for them.

 

In addition, the task force must consider the following responsibilities for transfer to the Office of Early Learning:

 

(A) responsibilities of the commissioner of education for early childhood education programs and financing under sections 119A.50 to 119A.535, 121A.16 to 121A.19, and 124D.129 to 124D.2211;

 

(B) responsibilities of the commissioner of human services for child care assistance, child care development, and early childhood learning and child protection facilities programs and financing under chapter 119B and section 256E.37; and


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(C) responsibilities of the commissioner of health for family home visiting programs and financing under section 145A.17.

 

Any costs incurred by the council in making these recommendations must be paid from private funds.  If no private funds are received, the council must not proceed in making these recommendations.  The council must report its recommendations to the governor and the legislature by January 15, 2011;

 

(3) (2) review program evaluations regarding high-quality early childhood programs;

 

(4) (3) make recommendations to the governor and legislature, including proposed legislation on how to most effectively create a high-quality early childhood system in Minnesota in order to improve the educational outcomes of children so that all children are school-ready by 2020 have the opportunities and experiences to support a successful transition to kindergarten; and

 

(5) make recommendations to the governor and the legislature by March 1, 2011, on the creation and implementation of a statewide school readiness report card to monitor progress toward the goal of having all children ready for kindergarten by the year 2020.  The recommendations shall include what should be measured including both children and system indicators, what benchmarks should be established to measure state progress toward the goal, and how frequently the report card should be published.  In making their recommendations, the council shall consider the indicators and strategies for Minnesota's early childhood system report, the Minnesota school readiness study, developmental assessment at kindergarten entrance, and the work of the council's accountability committee.  Any costs incurred by the council in making these recommendations must be paid from private funds.  If no private funds are received, the council must not proceed in making these recommendations; and

 

(6) make recommendations to the governor and the legislature on how to screen earlier and comprehensively assess children for school readiness in order to provide increased early interventions and increase the number of children ready for kindergarten.  In formulating their recommendations, the council shall consider (i) ways to interface with parents of children who are not participating in early childhood education or care programs, (ii) ways to interface with family child care providers, child care centers, and school-based early childhood and Head Start programs, (iii) if there are age-appropriate and culturally sensitive screening and assessment tools for three-, four-, and five-year-olds, (iv) the role of the medical community in screening, (v) incentives for parents to have children screened at an earlier age, (vi) incentives for early education and care providers to comprehensively assess children in order to improve instructional practice, (vii) how to phase in increases in screening and assessment over time, (viii) how the screening and assessment data will be collected and used and who will have access to the data, (ix) how to monitor progress toward the goal of having 50 percent of three-year-old children screened and 50 percent of entering kindergarteners assessed for school readiness by 2015 and 100 percent of three-year-old children screened and entering kindergarteners assessed for school readiness by 2020, and (x) costs to meet these benchmarks.  The council shall consider the screening instruments and comprehensive assessment tools used in Minnesota early childhood education and care programs and kindergarten.  The council may survey early childhood education and care programs in the state to determine the screening and assessment tools being used or rely on previously collected survey data, if available.  For purposes of this subdivision, "school readiness" is defined as the child's skills, knowledge, and behaviors at kindergarten entrance in these areas of child development:  social; self-regulation; cognitive, including language, literacy, and mathematical thinking; and physical.  For purposes of this subdivision, "screening" is defined as the activities used to identify a child who may need further evaluation to determine delay in development or disability.  For purposes of this subdivision, "assessment" is defined as the activities used to determine a child's level of performance in order to promote the child's learning and development.  Work on this duty will begin in fiscal year 2012.  Any costs incurred by the council in making these recommendations must be paid from private funds.  If no private funds are received, the council must not proceed in making these recommendations.  The council must report its recommendations to the governor and legislature by January 15, 2013, with an interim report on February 15, 2011.


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(4) review and provide input on the recommendations and implementation timelines developed by the Great Start For All Minnesota Children Task Force under Laws 2021, First Special Session chapter 7, article 14, section 18, subdivision 2.

 

Sec. 9.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 124D.142, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  System components.  (a) The standards-based voluntary quality rating and improvement system includes:

 

(1) at least a one-star rating for all programs licensed under Minnesota Rules, chapter 9502 or 9503, or Tribally licensed that do not opt out of the system under paragraph (b) and that are not:

 

(i) the subject of a finding of fraud for which the program or individual is currently serving a penalty or exclusion;

 

(ii) prohibited from receiving public funds under section 245.095, regardless of whether the action is under appeal;

 

(iii) under revocation, suspension, temporary immediate suspension, or decertification, or is operating under a conditional license, regardless of whether the action is under appeal; or

 

(iv) the subject of suspended, denied, or terminated payments to a provider under section 119B.13, subdivision 6, paragraph (d), clause (1) or (2); 245E.02, subdivision 4, paragraph (c), clause (4); or 256.98, subdivision 1, regardless of whether the action is under appeal;

 

(1) (2) quality opportunities in order to improve the educational outcomes of children so that they are ready for school;

 

(2) (3) a framework based on the Minnesota quality rating system rating tool and a common set of child outcome and program standards informed by evaluation results;

 

(3) (4) a tool to increase the number of publicly funded and regulated early learning and care services in both public and private market programs that are high quality;

 

(4) (5) voluntary participation ensuring that if a program or provider chooses to participate, the program or provider will be rated and may receive public funding associated with the rating; and

 

(5) (6) tracking progress toward statewide access to high-quality early learning and care programs, progress toward the number of low-income children whose parents can access quality programs, and progress toward increasing the number of children who are fully prepared to enter kindergarten.

 

(b) By July 1, 2026, the commissioner of human services shall establish a process by which a program may opt out of the rating under paragraph (a), clause (1).  The commissioner shall consult with Tribes to develop a process for rating Tribally licensed programs that is consistent with the goal outlined in paragraph (a), clause (1).

 

Sec. 10.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 124D.162, is amended to read:

 

124D.162 KINDERGARTEN READINESS ENTRY ASSESSMENT.

 

Subdivision 1.  Assessment required.  The commissioner of education may must implement a kindergarten readiness entry assessment representative of incoming kindergartners to identify the percent of kindergartners who meet or exceed end-of-year prekindergarten early learning standards.  The assessment must be based on the Department of Education Kindergarten Readiness Assessment at kindergarten entrance study.


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Subd. 2.  Process.  (a) School districts and charter schools must choose a kindergarten entry assessment tool from a menu of valid and reliable measurement instruments approved by the department that:

 

(1) are aligned to the state early childhood indicators of progress and kindergarten standards and are based on the criteria to be an early learning assessment approved by the department;

 

(2) support the world's best workforce goals in section 120B.11, subdivision 1, paragraph (c); and

 

(3) are based, in part, on information collected from teachers, early learning professionals, families, and other partners.

 

(b) The department must provide technical assistance and professional development related to the assessment required under this section to educators, school districts, and charter schools.

 

Subd. 3.  Reporting.  School districts and charter schools must annually report the results of kindergarten entry assessments to the department in a form and manner determined by the commissioner that is concurrent with a district's and charter school's world's best workforce report under section 120B.11, subdivision 5.  The commissioner must publicly report kindergarten readiness results as part of the performance reports required under section 120B.36 and in a manner consistent with section 120B.35, subdivision 3, paragraph (a), clause (2).

 

Subd. 4.  Implementation.  The requirements under this section must be phased in over three school years with all school districts and charter schools complying beginning with the 2025-2026 school year.

 

Sec. 11.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 124D.165, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Family eligibility.  (a) For a family to receive an early learning scholarship, parents or guardians must have an eligible child and meet at least one of the following eligibility requirements:

 

(1) have an eligible child; and

 

(2) (1) have income equal to or less than 185 percent of federal poverty level income:

 

(i) the at-application rate specified in section 119B.09, subdivision 1, paragraph (a), clause (2), in the current calendar year, or; or

 

(ii) beginning July 1, 2025, the rate specified in United States Code, title 42, section 9858n(4)(B), as adjusted for family size;

 

(2) be able to document their child's current participation in the free and reduced-price lunch meal program or Child and Adult Care Food Program, National School Lunch Act, United States Code, title 42, sections 1751 and 1766; the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations, Food and Nutrition Act, United States Code, title 7, sections 2011-2036; Head Start under the federal Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007; Minnesota family investment program under chapter 256J; child care assistance programs under chapter 119B; the supplemental nutrition assistance program; or placement

 

(3) have a child referred as in need of child protection services or placed in foster care under section 260C.212.

 

(b) An "eligible child" means a child who has not yet enrolled in kindergarten and is:

 

(1) at least three but not yet five years of age on September 1 of the current school year;.


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(2) a sibling from birth to age five of a child who has been awarded a scholarship under this section provided the sibling attends the same program as long as funds are available;

 

(3) the child of a parent under age 21 who is pursuing a high school degree or a course of study for a high school equivalency test; or

 

(4) homeless, in foster care, or in need of child protective services.

 

(c) A child who has received a scholarship under this section must continue to receive a scholarship each year until that child is eligible for kindergarten under section 120A.20 and as long as funds are available.

 

(d) Early learning scholarships may not be counted as earned income for the purposes of medical assistance under chapter 256B, MinnesotaCare under chapter 256L, Minnesota family investment program under chapter 256J, child care assistance programs under chapter 119B, or Head Start under the federal Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007.

 

(e) A child from an adjoining state whose family resides at a Minnesota address as assigned by the United States Postal Service, who has received developmental screening under sections 121A.16 to 121A.19, who intends to enroll in a Minnesota school district, and whose family meets the criteria of paragraph (a) is eligible for an early learning scholarship under this section.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective July 1, 2024, except paragraph (b) is effective January 1, 2024. 

 

Sec. 12.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 124D.165, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 2a.  Applications; priorities.  (a) The commissioner shall establish application timelines and determine the schedule for awarding scholarships that meet the operational needs of eligible families and programs.

 

(b) The commissioner must give highest priority to applications from children who:

 

(1) are not yet four years of age;

 

(2) have a parent under age 21 who is pursuing a high school diploma or a course of study for a high school equivalency test;

 

(3) are in foster care;

 

(4) have been referred as in need of child protection services;

 

(5) have an incarcerated parent;

 

(6) have a parent in a substance use treatment program;

 

(7) have a parent in a mental health treatment program;

 

(8) have experienced domestic violence; or

 

(9) have experienced homelessness in the last 24 months, as defined under the federal McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, United States Code, title 42, section 1143a.


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(c) Notwithstanding paragraph (b), beginning July 1, 2025, the commissioner must give highest priority to applications from children in families with income equal to or less than the rate specified under subdivision 2, paragraph (a), clause (1), item (i), and within this group must prioritize children who meet one or more of the criteria listed in paragraph (b).

 

(d) The commissioner may prioritize applications on additional factors, including but not limited to availability of funding, family income, geographic location, and whether the child's family is on a waiting list for a publicly funded program providing early education or child care services.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective July 1, 2024, except paragraph (b), clause (1), is effective January 1, 2025. 

 

Sec. 13.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 124D.165, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Administration.  (a) The commissioner shall establish application timelines and determine the schedule for awarding scholarships that meets operational needs of eligible families and programs.  The commissioner must give highest priority to applications from children who:

 

(1) have a parent under age 21 who is pursuing a high school diploma or a course of study for a high school equivalency test;

 

(2) are in foster care or otherwise in need of protection or services; or

 

(3) have experienced homelessness in the last 24 months, as defined under the federal McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, United States Code, title 42, section 11434a.

 

The commissioner may prioritize applications on additional factors including family income, geographic location, and whether the child's family is on a waiting list for a publicly funded program providing early education or child care services.

 

(b) (a) The commissioner shall establish a target for the average scholarship amount per child schedule of tiered per-child scholarship amounts based on the results of the rate survey conducted under section 119B.02, subdivision 7, the cost of providing high-quality early care and learning to children in varying circumstances, a family's income, and geographic location.

 

(b) Notwithstanding paragraph (a), a program that has a four-star rating under section 124D.142 must receive, for each scholarship recipient who meets the criteria in subdivision 2a, paragraph (b) or (c), an amount not less than the cost to provide full-time care at the 75th percentile of the most recent market rate survey under section 119B.02, subdivision 7.

 

(c) A four-star rated program that has children eligible for a scholarship enrolled in or on a waiting list for a program beginning in July, August, or September may notify the commissioner, in the form and manner prescribed by the commissioner, each year of the program's desire to enhance program services or to serve more children than current funding provides.  The commissioner may designate a predetermined number of scholarship slots for that program and notify the program of that number.  For fiscal year 2018 and later, the statewide amount of funding directly designated by the commissioner must not exceed the funding directly designated for fiscal year 2017.  Beginning July 1, 2016, a school district or Head Start program qualifying under this paragraph may use its established registration process to enroll scholarship recipients and may verify a scholarship recipient's family income in the same manner as for other program participants.


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(d) A scholarship is awarded for a 12-month period.  If the scholarship recipient has not been accepted and subsequently enrolled in a rated program within ten three months of the awarding of the scholarship, the scholarship cancels and the recipient must reapply in order to be eligible for another scholarship.  An extension may be requested if a program is unavailable for the child within the three-month timeline.  A child may not be awarded more than one scholarship in a 12-month period.

 

(e) A child who receives a scholarship who has not completed development screening under sections 121A.16 to 121A.19 must complete that screening within 90 days of first attending an eligible program or within 90 days after the child's third birthday if awarded a scholarship under the age of three.

 

(f) For fiscal year 2017 and later, a school district or Head Start program enrolling scholarship recipients under paragraph (c) may apply to the commissioner, in the form and manner prescribed by the commissioner, for direct payment of state aid.  Upon receipt of the application, the commissioner must pay each program directly for each approved scholarship recipient enrolled under paragraph (c) according to the metered payment system or another schedule established by the commissioner.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective July 1, 2024.

 

Sec. 14.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 124D.165, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Early childhood program eligibility.  (a) In order to be eligible to accept an early learning scholarship, a program must:

 

(1) participate in the quality rating and improvement system under section 124D.142; and.

 

(2) beginning July 1, 2024, have a three- or four-star rating in the quality rating and improvement system.

 

(b) Any program accepting scholarships must use the revenue to supplement and not supplant federal funding.

 

Sec. 15.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 124D.165, subdivision 6, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 6.  Early learning scholarship account.  (a) An account is established in the special revenue fund known as the "early learning scholarship account."

 

(b) Funds appropriated for early learning scholarships under this section must be transferred to the early learning scholarship account in the special revenue fund.

 

(c) Money in the account is annually appropriated to the commissioner for early learning scholarships under this section.  Any returned funds are available to be regranted.

 

(d) Up to $950,000 $2,133,000 annually is appropriated to the commissioner for costs associated with administering and monitoring early learning scholarships.

 

(e) The commissioner may use funds under paragraph (c) for the purpose of family outreach and distribution of scholarships.

 

(f) The commissioner may use up to $5,000,000 in funds under paragraph (c) to create information technology systems, including but not limited to an online application, a case management system, attendance tracking, and a centralized payment system.  Beginning July 1, 2025, the commissioner may use up to $750,000 annually in funds under paragraph (c) to maintain the information technology systems created under this paragraph.


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Sec. 16.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 125A.13, is amended to read:

 

125A.13 SCHOOL OF PARENTS' CHOICE.

 

(a) Nothing in this chapter must be construed as preventing parents of a child with a disability from sending the child to a school of their choice, if they so elect, subject to admission standards and policies adopted according to sections 125A.62 to 125A.64 and 125A.66 to 125A.73, and all other provisions of chapters 120A to 129C.

 

(b) The parent of a student with a disability not yet enrolled in kindergarten and not open enrolled in a nonresident district may request that the resident district enter into a tuition agreement with elect, in the same manner as the parent of a resident student with a disability, a school in the nonresident district if:

 

(1) where the child is enrolled in a Head Start program or a licensed child care setting in the nonresident district; and, provided

 

(2) the child can be served in the same setting as other children in the nonresident district with the same level of disability.

 

Sec. 17.  DIRECTION TO COMMISSIONER OF HUMAN SERVICES; ONE-STAR RATING REPORT.

 

The commissioner of human services must engage with early care and learning providers to assess how the availability of a one-star rating under Minnesota Statutes, section 124D.142, subdivision 2, paragraph (a), clause (1), may impact the number of providers that choose to work toward higher ratings under Minnesota Statutes, section 124D.142.  The commissioner must determine the cost to establish the one-star rating under Minnesota Statutes, section 124D.142, subdivision 2, paragraph (a), clause (1), and the extent to which funding is needed to support quality improvement for providers that seek to earn higher ratings.  By December 31, 2024, the commissioner must report on findings under this section to the legislative committees with jurisdiction over early care and learning programs.

 

Sec. 18.  APPROPRIATIONS GIVEN EFFECT ONCE.

 

If an appropriation or transfer in this article is enacted more than once during the 2023 regular session, the appropriation or transfer must be given effect once.

 

Sec. 19.  APPROPRIATION; GREAT START SCHOLARSHIPS PROGRAM.

 

$2,610,000 in fiscal year 2024 is appropriated from the general fund to the commissioner of human services for establishing and implementing the great start scholarships program under Minnesota Statutes, section 119C.01.  The commissioner may transfer all or part of the appropriation to the commissioner of children, youth, and families beginning July 1, 2024.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027.

 

Sec. 20.  APPROPRIATIONS; DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION.

 

Subdivision 1.  Department of Education.  The sums indicated in this section are appropriated from the general fund to the Department of Education for the fiscal years designated.

 

Subd. 2.  Grow Your Own.  (a) For grants to develop, continue, or expand Grow Your Own programs under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.731:

 

 

 

$2,500,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$2,500,000

. . . . .

2025


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(b) This appropriation is subject to the requirements under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.731, subdivision 4.

 

(c) The base for fiscal year 2026 and later is $500,000.

 

Subd. 3.  Early childhood and family education teacher shortage.  (a) For transfer to the Office of Higher Education for grants to Minnesota institutions of higher education to address the early childhood and family education teacher shortage:

 

 

 

$500,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$500,000

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) Grant funds may be used to provide tuition and other supports to students.

 

(c) Up to five percent of the grant amount is available for grant administration and monitoring.

 

(d) Any balance in the first year does not cancel but is available in the second year.

 

Subd. 4.  School readiness.  (a) For revenue for school readiness programs under Minnesota Statutes, sections 124D.15 and 124D.16:

 

 

 

$33,683,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$33,683,000

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) The 2024 appropriation includes $3,368,000 for 2023 and $30,315,000 for 2024.

 

(c) The 2025 appropriation includes $3,368,000 for 2024 and $30,315,000 for 2025.

 

Subd. 5.  Early learning scholarships.  (a) For the early learning scholarship program under Minnesota Statutes, section 124D.165:

 

 

 

$196,737,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$196,738,000

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) This appropriation is subject to the requirements under Minnesota Statutes, section 124D.165, subdivision 6.

 

(c) The base for fiscal year 2026 and later is $100,173,000.

 

Subd. 6.  Head Start program.  (a) For Head Start programs under Minnesota Statutes, section 119A.52:

 

 

 

$35,100,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$35,100,000

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) Any balance in the first year does not cancel but is available in the second year.

 

Subd. 7.  Early childhood family education aid.  (a) For early childhood family education aid under Minnesota Statutes, section 124D.135:

 

 

 

$37,497,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$39,108,000

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) The 2024 appropriation includes $3,518,000 for 2023 and $33,979,000 for 2024.

 

(c) The 2025 appropriation includes $3,775,000 for 2024 and $35,333,000 for 2025.


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Subd. 8.  Early childhood family education support staff.  (a) For the purposes described under Minnesota Statutes, section 124D.13, subdivision 12a:

 

 

 

$375,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$375,000

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) Any balance in the first year does not cancel but is available in the second year.

 

Subd. 9.  Developmental screening aid.  (a) For developmental screening aid under Minnesota Statutes, sections 121A.17 and 121A.19:

 

 

 

$4,350,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$4,375,000

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) The 2024 appropriation includes $349,000 for 2023 and $4,001,000 for 2024.

 

(c) The 2025 appropriation includes $445,000 for 2024 and $3,930,000 for 2025.

 

Subd. 10.  Administrative costs for developmental screening.  (a) For the administrative costs associated with developmental screening under Minnesota Statutes, sections 121A.17 and 121A.19:

 

 

 

$127,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$77,000

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) The base for fiscal year 2026 and later is $77,000.

 

Subd. 11.  ParentChild+ program.  (a) For a grant to the ParentChild+ program:

 

 

 

$1,800,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$1,800,000

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) The grant must be used for an evidence-based and research-validated early childhood literacy and school readiness program for children ages 16 months to four years at its existing suburban program location.  The program must include urban and rural program locations for fiscal years 2024 and 2025.

 

(c) Any balance in the first year does not cancel but is available in the second year.

 

(d) The base for fiscal year 2026 and later is $900,000.

 

Subd. 12.  Kindergarten entry assessment.  (a) For the kindergarten entry assessment under Minnesota Statutes, section 124D.162:

 

 

 

$1,049,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$2,037,000

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) The base for fiscal year 2026 is $2,357,000 and the base for fiscal year 2027 is $1,743,000.

 

Subd. 13.  Quality rating and improvement system.  (a) For transfer to the commissioner of human services for the purposes of expanding the quality rating and improvement system under Minnesota Statutes, section 124D.142, in greater Minnesota and increasing supports for providers participating in the quality rating and improvement system:

 

 

 

$2,850,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$1,750,000

. . . . .

2025


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(b) The amounts in paragraph (a) must be in addition to any federal funding under the child care and development block grant authorized under Public Law 101-508 in that year for the system under Minnesota Statutes, section 124D.142.

 

(c) The commissioner of human services shall use up to $1,100,000 in fiscal year 2024 from the amount appropriated under paragraph (a) to establish and report on the automatic one-star rating under Minnesota Statutes, section 124D.142, subdivision 2, paragraph (a), and to offer related supports. 

 

Subd. 14.  Children's savings accounts start-up grants.  (a) For a grant to Youthprise to implement and administer a pilot program to award grants to entities to start up new, local child savings account programs:

 

 

 

$500,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$0

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) Youthprise must allocate at least $400,000 of this appropriation for grants to entities in up to four locations in the state to start up new, local child savings account programs.  To the extent possible, Youthprise must award grants in urban, rural, suburban, and Tribal settings.

 

(c) By December 1, 2025, Youthprise must report on the status and any outcomes of the pilot project to the Department of Education and relevant committees of the legislature.

 

(d) This is a onetime appropriation and is available through June 30, 2025.

 

Subd. 15.  Early childhood programs at Tribal contract schools.  (a) For early childhood family education programs at Tribal contract schools under Minnesota Statutes, section 124D.83, subdivision 4:

 

 

 

$68,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$68,000

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) Any balance in the first year does not cancel but is available in the second year.

 

Subd. 16.  Educate parents partnership.  (a) For the educate parents partnership under Minnesota Statutes, section 124D.129:

 

 

 

$49,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$49,000

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) Any balance in the first year does not cancel but is available in the second year.

 

Subd. 17.  Home visiting aid.  (a) For home visiting aid under Minnesota Statutes, section 124D.135:

 

 

 

$391,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$309,000

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) The 2024 appropriation includes $41,000 for 2023 and $350,000 for 2024.

 

(c) The 2025 appropriation includes $38,000 for 2024 and $271,000 for 2025.


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Subd. 18.  Learning with Music program.  (a) For a grant to the MacPhail Center for Music to expand the Learning with Music program:

 

 

 

$250,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$250,000

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) The MacPhail Center for Music must use the grant money received under this subdivision to:

 

(1) expand direct programming to four early childhood center locations in each year of the grant, with a focus on meeting the needs of children experiencing economic hardship in the metropolitan area; and

 

(2) create and deliver professional development training opportunities to early childhood educators statewide, both online and in person, that are based on current successful elements of the Learning with Music program.

 

(c) Any balance in the first year does not cancel but is available in the second year.

 

(d) The base for fiscal year 2026 is $0.

 

Subd. 19.  Way to Grow.  (a) For a grant to Way to Grow:

 

 

 

$150,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$150,000

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) Way to Grow must use the grant money to extend its home visiting services, including family support services, health and wellness education, and learning support to more families with children from birth to age eight.

 

(c) This is a onetime appropriation.

 

Subd. 20.  Reach Out and Read Minnesota.  (a) For a grant to Reach Out and Read Minnesota to establish a statewide plan that encourages early childhood development through a network of health care clinics:

 

 

 

$250,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$250,000

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) The grant recipient must develop and implement a plan that includes:

 

(1) integrating children's books and parent education into well-child visits;

 

(2) creating literacy-rich environments at health care clinics by providing books to clinics for visits outside of Reach Out and Read Minnesota parameters, for waiting room use, or for volunteer readers to model read-aloud techniques for parents where possible;

 

(3) working with public health clinics, federally qualified health centers, Tribal sites, community health centers, and clinics that belong to health care systems, as well as independent clinics in underserved areas; and

 

(4) training medical professionals on discussing the importance of early literacy with parents of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers.

 

(c) The grant recipient must fully implement the plan on a statewide basis by 2030.


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Subd. 21.  Executive function across generations curriculum grant.  (a) For a grant to the family partnership for an executive function curriculum pilot program:

 

 

 

$300,000

. . . . .

2024

 

(b) The family partnership must establish six sites across Minnesota to provide executive function across generations curriculum.  The sites must be spread across the state and include rural, suburban, and urban early education and care providers, organizations providing home visiting services, or parenting groups in high-risk communities.  The family partnership must report to the legislature by December 15, 2024, and December 15, 2025, on the progress made to expand the executive function curriculum across Minnesota.

 

(c) This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2025.

 

Subd. 22.  Metro Deaf School.  (a) For a grant to Metro Deaf School to provide services to young children who have a primary disability of deaf, deafblind, or hard-of-hearing and who are not eligible for funding under Minnesota Statutes, section 124E.11, paragraph (h):

 

 

 

$100,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$100,000

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) This is a onetime appropriation.

 

Subd. 23.  Voluntary prekindergarten administrative costs.  For administrative and IT costs associated with the voluntary prekindergarten program under Minnesota Statutes, section 124D.151:

 

 

 

$340,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$691,000

. . . . .

2025

 

Subd. 24.  Early childhood curriculum grants.  (a) For competitive grants to Minnesota postsecondary institutions to improve the curricula of the recipient institution's early childhood education programs by incorporating or conforming to the Minnesota knowledge and competency frameworks for early childhood professionals:

 

 

 

$250,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$250,000

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) By December 1, 2024, and again by December 1, 2025, the commissioner must submit a report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees with jurisdiction over early childhood through grade 12 education and higher education finance and policy reporting on grants awarded under this subdivision.  The report must include the following information for the previous fiscal year:

 

(1) the number of grant applications received;

 

(2) the criteria applied by the commissioner for evaluating applications;

 

(3) the number of grants awarded, grant recipients, and amounts awarded;

 

(4) early childhood education curricular reforms proposed by each recipient institution;

 

(5) grant outcomes for each recipient institution; and


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(6) other information identified by the commissioner as outcome indicators.

 

(c) The commissioner may use no more than three percent of the appropriation under this subdivision to administer the grant program.

 

(d) This is a onetime appropriation.

 

Subd. 25.  Great start scholarships program.  (a) For establishing and implementing the great start scholarships program under Minnesota Statutes, section 119C.01:

 

 

 

$1,656,000

. . . . .

2024

 

 

$0

. . . . .

2025

 

(b) The commissioner may transfer all or part of the appropriation to the commissioner of children, youth, and families beginning July 1, 2024. 

 

(c) This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2027."

 

Delete the title and insert:

 

"A bill for an act relating to early childhood; modifying provisions for early learning scholarships, Head Start, and early education programs; providing for early childhood educator programs; requiring reports; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 119A.52; 121A.17, subdivision 3; 121A.19; 124D.13, by adding a subdivision; 124D.141, subdivision 2; 124D.142, subdivision 2; 124D.162; 124D.165, subdivisions 2, 3, 4, 6, by adding a subdivision; 125A.13; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 122A; proposing coding for new law as Minnesota Statutes, chapter 119C."

 

 

      We request the adoption of this report and repassage of the bill. 

 

 

      House Conferees:  Dave Pinto and Maria Isa Pérez-Vega.

 

 

 

 

      Senate Conferees: Mary Kunesh and Melissa Wiklund.

 

 

      Pinto moved that the report of the Conference Committee on H. F. No. 2292 be adopted and that the bill be repassed as amended by the Conference Committee.  The motion prevailed.

 

 

      H. F. No. 2292, A bill for an act relating to early childhood; modifying provisions for early learning scholarships, Head Start, and early education programs; providing for early childhood educator programs; requiring reports; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 119A.52; 121A.17, subdivision 3; 121A.19; 124D.13, by adding a subdivision; 124D.141, subdivision 2; 124D.162; 124D.165, subdivisions 2, 3, 4, 6; 125A.13; 179A.03, subdivision 18; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 122A.

 

 

      The bill was read for the third time, as amended by Conference, and placed upon its repassage.

 

      The question was taken on the repassage of the bill and the roll was called.  There were 71 yeas and 61 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Acomb

Agbaje

Bahner

Becker-Finn

Berg

Bierman

Brand

Carroll

Cha

Clardy

Coulter

Curran

Edelson

Elkins

Feist

Finke

Fischer

Frazier

Frederick

Freiberg

Gomez

Greenman

Hansen, R.

Hanson, J.

Hassan

Hemmingsen-Jaeger

Her

Hicks

Hill

Hollins


Journal of the House - 70th Day - Monday, May 15, 2023 - Top of Page 7635

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Hussein

Jordan

Keeler

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Kozlowski

Kraft

Lee, F.

Lee, K.

Liebling

Lillie

Lislegard

Long

Moller

Nadeau

Nelson, M.

Newton

Noor

Norris

Olson, L.

Pelowski

Pérez-Vega

Pinto

Pryor

Pursell

Rehm

Reyer

Richardson

Sencer-Mura

Smith

Stephenson

Tabke

Vang

Wolgamott

Xiong

Youakim

Spk. Hortman


 

      Those who voted in the negative were:

 


Altendorf

Anderson, P. E.

Backer

Bakeberg

Baker

Bennett

Bliss

Burkel

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Davis

Demuth

Dotseth

Engen

Fogelman

Franson

Garofalo

Gillman

Grossell

Harder

Heintzeman

Hudella

Hudson

Igo

Jacob

Johnson

Joy

Knudsen

Koznick

Kresha

McDonald

Mekeland

Mueller

Murphy

Myers

Nash

Nelson, N.

Neu Brindley

Niska

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson, B.

O'Neill

Perryman

Petersburg

Pfarr

Quam

Robbins

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Skraba

Swedzinski

Torkelson

Urdahl

West

Wiener

Wiens

Witte

Zeleznikar


 

 

      The bill was repassed, as amended by Conference, and its title agreed to.

 

 

MOTIONS AND RESOLUTIONS, Continued

 

 

MOTIONS FOR RECONSIDERATION

 

      Stephenson moved that the vote whereby H. F. No. 1370, as amended by Conference, was repassed on Friday, May 12, 2023, be now reconsidered.  The motion prevailed.

 

 

      Stephenson moved that the vote whereby the report of the Conference Committee on H. F. No. 1370 was adopted on Friday, May 12, 2023, be now reconsidered.  The motion prevailed.

 

 

      Stephenson moved that H. F. No. 1370 be returned to the Conference Committee.  The motion prevailed. 

 

 

      There being no objection, the order of business reverted to Messages from the Senate.

 

 

MESSAGES FROM THE SENATE

 

 

      The following messages were received from the Senate:

 

 

Madam Speaker:

 

I hereby announce the passage by the Senate of the following House File, herewith returned, as amended by the Senate, in which amendments the concurrence of the House is respectfully requested:

 

H. F. No. 2950, A bill for an act relating to retirement; making administrative changes to the statutes governing the retirement plans administered by the Minnesota State Retirement System, the Public Employees Retirement Association, and the Teachers Retirement Association; amending eligibility to permit appointed local government


Journal of the House - 70th Day - Monday, May 15, 2023 - Top of Page 7636

officials to participate in the public employees defined contribution plan; permitting the transfer of service credit from the general public employees retirement plan to the public employees police and fire retirement plan for two employees of the Metropolitan Airports Commission; permitting eligible retired teachers in the St. Paul Teachers Retirement Fund Association to change the teacher's retirement annuity to an annuity that will pay a survivor annuity to a same-sex spouse; authorizing certain members of the higher education individual retirement account plan to elect Teachers Retirement Association coverage and receive retroactive service credit; extending the payment period for the purchase of service credit for periods of military service; increasing the cap on the employer contribution to certain trades' multiemployer pension plans; Public Employees Retirement Association statewide volunteer firefighter plan; modifying service counted in determining vesting in a retirement benefit, amending requirements applicable to a relief association after the affiliated fire department joins the statewide plan, and authorizing the Hamel and Loretto volunteer firefighter relief associations to join the statewide plan mid-year and merge; increasing the dollar threshold for requiring audited financial reports for volunteer firefighter relief associations; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 352B.08, subdivision 1; 353.01, subdivisions 2a, 2b, 15; 353.0162; 353.031, subdivision 10; 353.32, subdivision 1c; 353D.01, subdivision 2, by adding a subdivision; 353D.02, subdivision 1; 353D.03, subdivision 1; 353E.001, by adding subdivisions; 353E.07, subdivisions 3, 4, 5; 353G.01, subdivisions 8, 15, by adding subdivisions; 353G.06, subdivisions 2, 3; 353G.09, subdivisions 1, 2, by adding a subdivision; 353G.14; 354.06, subdivision 2; 354.53, subdivision 3; 354A.093, subdivision 4; 356.24, subdivision 1; 356.551, subdivision 2; 424A.014, subdivision 1; 490.1211; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 354A; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 353.01, subdivision 15a; 353G.01, subdivision 7; 353G.13; 490.124, subdivision 10.

 

Thomas S. Bottern, Secretary of the Senate

 

 

CONCURRENCE AND REPASSAGE

 

      Her moved that the House concur in the Senate amendments to H. F. No. 2950 and that the bill be repassed as amended by the Senate.  The motion prevailed.

 

 

H. F. No. 2950, A bill for an act relating to retirement; making administrative changes to the statutes governing the retirement plans administered by the Minnesota State Retirement System, the Public Employees Retirement Association, and the Teachers Retirement Association; amending eligibility to permit appointed local government officials to participate in the public employees defined contribution plan; permitting the transfer of service credit from the general public employees retirement plan to the public employees police and fire retirement plan for two employees of the Metropolitan Airports Commission; permitting eligible retired teachers in the St. Paul Teachers Retirement Fund Association to change the teacher's retirement annuity to an annuity that will pay a survivor annuity to a same-sex spouse; authorizing certain members of the higher education individual retirement account plan to elect Teachers Retirement Association coverage and receive retroactive service credit; extending the payment period for the purchase of service credit for periods of military service; increasing the cap on the employer contribution to certain trades' multiemployer pension plans; Public Employees Retirement Association statewide volunteer firefighter plan; modifying service counted in determining vesting in a retirement benefit, amending requirements applicable to a relief association after the affiliated fire department joins the statewide plan, and authorizing the Hamel and Loretto volunteer firefighter relief associations to join the statewide plan mid-year and merge; increasing the dollar threshold for requiring audited financial reports for volunteer firefighter relief associations; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 352B.08, subdivision 1; 353.01, subdivisions 2a, 2b, 15; 353.0162; 353.031, subdivision 10; 353.32, subdivision 1c; 353D.01, subdivision 2, by adding a subdivision; 353D.02, subdivision 1; 353D.03, subdivision 1; 353E.001, by adding subdivisions; 353E.07, subdivisions 3, 4, 5; 353G.01, subdivisions 8, 15, by adding subdivisions; 353G.06, subdivisions 2, 3; 353G.09, subdivisions 1, 2, by adding a subdivision; 353G.14; 354.06, subdivision 2; 354.53, subdivision 3; 354A.093, subdivision 4; 356.24,


Journal of the House - 70th Day - Monday, May 15, 2023 - Top of Page 7637

subdivision 1; 356.551, subdivision 2; 424A.014, subdivision 1; 490.1211; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 354A; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 353.01, subdivision 15a; 353G.01, subdivision 7; 353G.13; 490.124, subdivision 10.

 

 

      The bill was read for the third time, as amended by the Senate, and placed upon its repassage.

 

      The question was taken on the repassage of the bill and the roll was called.  There were 132 yeas and 0 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Acomb

Agbaje

Altendorf

Anderson, P. E.

Backer

Bahner

Bakeberg

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Berg

Bierman

Bliss

Brand

Burkel

Carroll

Cha

Clardy

Coulter

Curran

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Davis

Demuth

Dotseth

Edelson

Elkins

Engen

Feist

Finke

Fischer

Fogelman

Franson

Frazier

Frederick

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gillman

Gomez

Greenman

Grossell

Hansen, R.

Hanson, J.

Harder

Hassan

Heintzeman

Hemmingsen-Jaeger

Her

Hicks

Hill

Hollins

Hornstein

Howard

Hudella

Hudson

Huot

Hussein

Igo

Jacob

Johnson

Jordan

Joy

Keeler

Klevorn

Knudsen

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Kozlowski

Koznick

Kraft

Kresha

Lee, F.

Lee, K.

Liebling

Lillie

Lislegard

Long

McDonald

Mekeland

Moller

Mueller

Murphy

Myers

Nadeau

Nash

Nelson, M.

Nelson, N.

Neu Brindley

Newton

Niska

Noor

Norris

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson, B.

Olson, L.

O'Neill

Pelowski

Pérez-Vega

Perryman

Petersburg

Pfarr

Pinto

Pryor

Pursell

Quam

Rehm

Reyer

Richardson

Robbins

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Sencer-Mura

Skraba

Smith

Stephenson

Swedzinski

Tabke

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

West

Wiener

Wiens

Witte

Wolgamott

Xiong

Youakim

Zeleznikar

Spk. Hortman


 

 

      The bill was repassed, as amended by the Senate, and its title agreed to.

 

 

Madam Speaker:

 

I hereby announce the passage by the Senate of the following House File, herewith returned, as amended by the Senate, in which amendments the concurrence of the House is respectfully requested:

 

H. F. No. 1234, A bill for an act relating to labor; modifying peace officer and firefighter duty disability provisions; requiring a report; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 299A.42; 299A.465, subdivision 4, by adding a subdivision; 352B.011, by adding a subdivision; 352B.10, subdivisions 1, 2a, 4, by adding a subdivision; 352B.101; 352B.105, subdivision 1; 353.01, subdivision 47; 353.031, subdivisions 1, 3, 4, 8, 9, by adding a subdivision; 353.335; 353.656, subdivisions 1, 1a, 1b, 3, 3a, 4, 6a, 10; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 352B; 353; 626; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 353.656, subdivisions 2, 2a.

 

Thomas S. Bottern, Secretary of the Senate


Journal of the House - 70th Day - Monday, May 15, 2023 - Top of Page 7638

CONCURRENCE AND REPASSAGE

 

      Her moved that the House concur in the Senate amendments to H. F. No. 1234 and that the bill be repassed as amended by the Senate.  The motion prevailed.

 

 

H. F. No. 1234, A bill for an act relating to labor; modifying peace officer and firefighter duty disability provisions; requiring a report; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 299A.42; 299A.465, subdivision 4; 352B.011, subdivision 10, by adding a subdivision; 352B.10, subdivisions 1, 2a, 4, by adding a subdivision; 352B.101; 352B.105, subdivision 1; 353.01, subdivision 47; 353.031, subdivisions 1, 3, 4, 8, 9; 353.335; 353.656, subdivisions 1, 1a, 1b, 3, 3a, 4, 6a, 10; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 352B; 353; 626; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 353.656, subdivisions 2, 2a.

 

 

      The bill was read for the third time, as amended by the Senate, and placed upon its repassage.

 

      The question was taken on the repassage of the bill and the roll was called.  There were 78 yeas and 54 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Acomb

Agbaje

Anderson, P. E.

Bahner

Becker-Finn

Berg

Bierman

Brand

Carroll

Cha

Clardy

Coulter

Curran

Edelson

Elkins

Feist

Finke

Fischer

Frazier

Frederick

Freiberg

Gomez

Greenman

Hansen, R.

Hanson, J.

Hassan

Hemmingsen-Jaeger

Her

Hicks

Hill

Hollins

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Hussein

Jordan

Keeler

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Kozlowski

Koznick

Kraft

Lee, F.

Lee, K.

Liebling

Lillie

Lislegard

Long

Moller

Mueller

Myers

Nadeau

Nelson, M.

Newton

Noor

Norris

Olson, L.

Pelowski

Pérez-Vega

Pinto

Pryor

Pursell

Rehm

Reyer

Richardson

Sencer-Mura

Smith

Stephenson

Tabke

Vang

Wiens

Witte

Wolgamott

Xiong

Youakim

Zeleznikar

Spk. Hortman


 

      Those who voted in the negative were:

 


Altendorf

Backer

Bakeberg

Baker

Bennett

Bliss

Burkel

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Davis

Demuth

Dotseth

Engen

Fogelman

Franson

Garofalo

Gillman

Grossell

Harder

Heintzeman

Hudella

Hudson

Igo

Jacob

Johnson

Joy

Knudsen

Kresha

McDonald

Mekeland

Murphy

Nash

Nelson, N.

Neu Brindley

Niska

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson, B.

O'Neill

Perryman

Petersburg

Pfarr

Quam

Robbins

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Skraba

Swedzinski

Torkelson

Urdahl

West

Wiener


 

 

      The bill was repassed, as amended by the Senate, and its title agreed to.


Journal of the House - 70th Day - Monday, May 15, 2023 - Top of Page 7639

Madam Speaker:

 

I hereby announce the passage by the Senate of the following House File, herewith returned, as amended by the Senate, in which amendments the concurrence of the House is respectfully requested:

 

H. F. No. 1486, A bill for an act relating to human services; allowing supervised practice of alcohol and drug counseling by former students for limited time; modifying HIV training requirements in substance use disorder treatment programs; modifying withdrawal management license requirements; modifying substance use disorder treatment client record documentation requirements; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 148F.11, by adding a subdivision; 245A.19; 245F.04, subdivision 1; 245G.06, subdivision 2b.

 

Thomas S. Bottern, Secretary of the Senate

 

 

CONCURRENCE AND REPASSAGE

 

      Frederick moved that the House concur in the Senate amendments to H. F. No. 1486 and that the bill be repassed as amended by the Senate.  The motion prevailed.

 

 

H. F. No. 1486, A bill for an act relating to human services; allowing supervised practice of alcohol and drug counseling by former students for limited time; modifying HIV training requirements in substance use disorder treatment programs; modifying withdrawal management license requirements; modifying substance use disorder treatment client record documentation requirements; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 148F.01, by adding a subdivision; 148F.11, by adding a subdivision; 245A.19; 245F.04, subdivision 1; 245G.06, subdivision 2b.

 

 

      The bill was read for the third time, as amended by the Senate, and placed upon its repassage.

 

      The question was taken on the repassage of the bill and the roll was called.  There were 132 yeas and 0 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Acomb

Agbaje

Altendorf

Anderson, P. E.

Backer

Bahner

Bakeberg

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Berg

Bierman

Bliss

Brand

Burkel

Carroll

Cha

Clardy

Coulter

Curran

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Davis

Demuth

Dotseth

Edelson

Elkins

Engen

Feist

Finke

Fischer

Fogelman

Franson

Frazier

Frederick

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gillman

Gomez

Greenman

Grossell

Hansen, R.

Hanson, J.

Harder

Hassan

Heintzeman

Hemmingsen-Jaeger

Her

Hicks

Hill

Hollins

Hornstein

Howard

Hudella

Hudson

Huot

Hussein

Igo

Jacob

Johnson

Jordan

Joy

Keeler

Klevorn

Knudsen

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Kozlowski

Koznick

Kraft

Kresha

Lee, F.

Lee, K.

Liebling

Lillie

Lislegard

Long

McDonald

Mekeland

Moller

Mueller

Murphy

Myers

Nadeau

Nash

Nelson, M.

Nelson, N.

Neu Brindley

Newton

Niska

Noor

Norris

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson, B.

Olson, L.

O'Neill

Pelowski

Pérez-Vega

Perryman

Petersburg

Pfarr

Pinto

Pryor

Pursell

Quam

Rehm


Journal of the House - 70th Day - Monday, May 15, 2023 - Top of Page 7640

Reyer

Richardson

Robbins

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Sencer-Mura

Skraba

Smith

Stephenson

Swedzinski

Tabke

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

West

Wiener

Wiens

Witte

Wolgamott

Xiong

Youakim

Zeleznikar

Spk. Hortman


 

 

      The bill was repassed, as amended by the Senate, and its title agreed to.

 

 

Madam Speaker:

 

I hereby announce the passage by the Senate of the following House File, herewith returned, as amended by the Senate, in which amendments the concurrence of the House is respectfully requested:

 

H. F. No. 1403, A bill for an act relating to human services; modifying and establishing laws regarding aging, disability, behavioral health, substance use disorder, and statewide opioid litigation; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 3.757, subdivision 1; 62N.25, subdivision 5; 62Q.1055; 62Q.47; 169A.70, subdivisions 3, 4; 245.462, subdivisions 3, 12; 245.4711, subdivisions 3, 4; 245.477; 245.4835, subdivision 2; 245.4871, subdivisions 3, 19; 245.4873, subdivision 4; 245.4881, subdivisions 3, 4; 245.4885, subdivision 1; 245.4887; 245.50, subdivision 5; 245A.03, subdivision 7; 245A.043, subdivision 3; 245A.16, subdivision 1; 245D.03, subdivision 1; 245F.06, subdivision 2; 245G.01, by adding subdivisions; 245G.02, subdivision 2; 245G.05, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 245G.06, subdivisions 1, 3, 4, by adding subdivisions; 245G.07, subdivision 2; 245G.09, subdivision 3; 245G.11, subdivision 8; 245G.22, subdivisions 2, 15, 17; 245I.04, by adding subdivisions; 245I.10, subdivision 6; 246.0135; 254A.03, subdivision 3; 254A.035, subdivision 2; 254A.19, subdivisions 1, 3, 4, by adding subdivisions; 254B.01, subdivisions 5, 8, by adding subdivisions; 254B.03, subdivisions 1, 2, 5; 254B.04, subdivisions 1, 2a, by adding subdivisions; 254B.05, subdivisions 1, 1a, 5; 256.01, by adding a subdivision; 256.045, subdivision 3; 256B.0615, subdivisions 1, 5; 256B.0911, subdivision 23; 256B.092, subdivision 10; 256B.093, subdivision 1; 256B.439, subdivisions 3c, 3d, by adding a subdivision; 256B.492; 256B.493, subdivisions 2a, 4; 256D.09, subdivision 2a; 256L.03, subdivision 2; 256L.12, subdivision 8; 256S.202, subdivision 1; 260B.157, subdivisions 1, 3; 260C.157, subdivision 3; 260E.20, subdivision 1; 299A.299, subdivision 1; 524.5-104; 524.5-313; Laws 2021, First Special Session chapter 7, article 2, section 17; article 6, section 12; article 11, section 18; article 13, section 43; article 17, section 20; Laws 2022, chapter 98, article 4, section 37; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 254B; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 169A.70, subdivision 6; 245G.05, subdivision 2; 245G.06, subdivision 2; 245G.22, subdivision 19; 254A.02, subdivision 8a; 254A.16, subdivision 6; 254A.19, subdivisions 1a, 2, 5; 254B.04, subdivisions 2b, 2c; 254B.041, subdivision 2; 254B.13, subdivisions 1, 2, 2a, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8; 254B.16; 256.041, subdivision 10; 256B.49, subdivision 23; 260.835, subdivision 2; Minnesota Rules, parts 9530.7000, subparts 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17a, 19, 20, 21; 9530.7005; 9530.7010; 9530.7012; 9530.7015, subparts 1, 2a, 4, 5, 6; 9530.7020, subparts 1, 1a, 2; 9530.7021; 9530.7022, subpart 1; 9530.7025; 9530.7030, subpart 1.

 

Thomas S. Bottern, Secretary of the Senate

 

 

CONCURRENCE AND REPASSAGE

 

      Fischer moved that the House concur in the Senate amendments to H. F. No. 1403 and that the bill be repassed as amended by the Senate.  The motion prevailed.

 

 

H. F. No. 1403, A bill for an act relating to human services; modifying and establishing laws regarding aging, disability, behavioral health, substance use disorder, and statewide opioid litigation; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 3.757, subdivision 1; 62N.25, subdivision 5; 62Q.1055; 62Q.47; 169A.70, subdivisions 3, 4; 245.462, subdivisions 3, 12; 245.4711, subdivisions 3, 4; 245.477; 245.4835, subdivision 2; 245.4871, subdivisions 3, 19;


Journal of the House - 70th Day - Monday, May 15, 2023 - Top of Page 7641

245.4873, subdivision 4; 245.4881, subdivisions 3, 4; 245.4885, subdivision 1; 245.4887; 245.50, subdivision 5; 245A.03, subdivision 7; 245A.043, subdivision 3; 245A.16, subdivision 1; 245D.03, subdivision 1; 245F.06, subdivision 2; 245G.01, by adding subdivisions; 245G.02, subdivision 2; 245G.05, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 245G.06, subdivisions 1, 3, 4, by adding subdivisions; 245G.07, subdivision 2; 245G.09, subdivision 3; 245G.11, subdivision 8; 245G.22, subdivisions 2, 15, 17; 245I.04, by adding subdivisions; 245I.10, subdivision 6; 246.0135; 254A.03, subdivision 3; 254A.035, subdivision 2; 254A.19, subdivisions 1, 3, 4, by adding subdivisions; 254B.01, subdivisions 5, 8, by adding subdivisions; 254B.03, subdivisions 1, 2, 5; 254B.04, subdivisions 1, 2a, by adding subdivisions; 254B.05, subdivisions 1, 1a, 5; 256.01, by adding a subdivision; 256.045, subdivision 3; 256B.0615, subdivisions 1, 5; 256B.0911, subdivision 23; 256B.092, subdivision 10; 256B.093, subdivision 1; 256B.439, subdivisions 3c, 3d, by adding a subdivision; 256B.492; 256B.493, subdivisions 2a, 4; 256D.09, subdivision 2a; 256L.03, subdivision 2; 256L.12, subdivision 8; 256S.202, subdivision 1; 260B.157, subdivisions 1, 3; 260C.157, subdivision 3; 260E.20, subdivision 1; 299A.299, subdivision 1; 524.5-104; 524.5-313; Laws 2021, First Special Session chapter 7, article 2, section 17; article 6, section 12; article 11, section 18; article 13, section 43; article 17, section 20; Laws 2022, chapter 98, article 4, section 37; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 254B; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 169A.70, subdivision 6; 245G.05, subdivision 2; 245G.06, subdivision 2; 245G.22, subdivision 19; 254A.02, subdivision 8a; 254A.16, subdivision 6; 254A.19, subdivisions 1a, 2, 5; 254B.04, subdivisions 2b, 2c; 254B.041, subdivision 2; 254B.13, subdivisions 1, 2, 2a, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8; 254B.16; 256.041, subdivision 10; 256B.49, subdivision 23; 260.835, subdivision 2; Minnesota Rules, parts 9530.7000, subparts 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17a, 19, 20, 21; 9530.7005; 9530.7010; 9530.7012; 9530.7015, subparts 1, 2a, 4, 5, 6; 9530.7020, subparts 1, 1a, 2; 9530.7021; 9530.7022, subpart 1; 9530.7025; 9530.7030, subpart 1.

 

 

      The bill was read for the third time, as amended by the Senate, and placed upon its repassage.

 

      The question was taken on the repassage of the bill and the roll was called.  There were 132 yeas and 0 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Acomb

Agbaje

Altendorf

Anderson, P. E.

Backer

Bahner

Bakeberg

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Berg

Bierman

Bliss

Brand

Burkel

Carroll

Cha

Clardy

Coulter

Curran

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Davis

Demuth

Dotseth

Edelson

Elkins

Engen

Feist

Finke

Fischer

Fogelman

Franson

Frazier

Frederick

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gillman

Gomez

Greenman

Grossell

Hansen, R.

Hanson, J.

Harder

Hassan

Heintzeman

Hemmingsen-Jaeger

Her

Hicks

Hill

Hollins

Hornstein

Howard

Hudella

Hudson

Huot

Hussein

Igo

Jacob

Johnson

Jordan

Joy

Keeler

Klevorn

Knudsen

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Kozlowski

Koznick

Kraft

Kresha

Lee, F.

Lee, K.

Liebling

Lillie

Lislegard

Long

McDonald

Mekeland

Moller

Mueller

Murphy

Myers

Nadeau

Nash

Nelson, M.

Nelson, N.

Neu Brindley

Newton

Niska

Noor

Norris

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson, B.

Olson, L.

O'Neill

Pelowski

Pérez-Vega

Perryman

Petersburg

Pfarr

Pinto

Pryor

Pursell

Quam

Rehm

Reyer

Richardson

Robbins

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Sencer-Mura

Skraba

Smith

Stephenson

Swedzinski

Tabke

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

West

Wiener

Wiens

Witte

Wolgamott

Xiong

Youakim

Zeleznikar

Spk. Hortman


 

 

      The bill was repassed, as amended by the Senate, and its title agreed to.


Journal of the House - 70th Day - Monday, May 15, 2023 - Top of Page 7642

           Long moved that the House recess subject to the call of the Chair.  The motion prevailed.

 

 

RECESS

 

 

RECONVENED

 

      The House reconvened and was called to order by the Speaker.

 

 

      Cha and Her were excused between the hours of 3:45 p.m. and 4:10 p.m.

 

 

MESSAGES FROM THE SENATE, Continued

 

 

      The following message was received from the Senate:

 

 

Madam Speaker:

 

I hereby announce that the Senate has concurred in and adopted the report of the Conference Committee on: 

 

S. F. No. 2909.

 

The Senate has repassed said bill in accordance with the recommendation and report of the Conference Committee.  Said Senate File is herewith transmitted to the House.

 

Thomas S. Bottern, Secretary of the Senate

 

 

CONFERENCE COMMITTEE REPORT ON S. F. No. 2909

 

A bill for an act relating to state government; providing for certain judiciary, public safety, corrections, human rights, firearm, clemency, rehabilitation and reinvestment, supervised release board, expungement, community supervision, and 911 Emergency Communication System policy; providing for reports; authorizing rulemaking; appropriating money for judiciary, courts, civil legal services, Guardian ad Litem Board, Uniform Laws Commission, Board on Judicial Standards, Board of Public Defense, human rights, sentencing guidelines, public safety, emergency management, criminal apprehension, fire marshal, firefighters, Office of Justice programs, Peace Officer Standards and Training Board, Private Detective Board, corrections, incarceration and release, probation, juveniles, and Ombudsperson for Corrections; amending Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 13.072, subdivision 1; 13.825, subdivision 3; 13.871, subdivisions 8, 14; 13A.02, subdivisions 1, 2; 144.6586, subdivision 2; 145.4712; 152.01, by adding a subdivision; 152.021, subdivisions 1, 2; 152.022, subdivisions 1, 2; 152.023, subdivision 2; 152.18, subdivision 1; 181.981, subdivision 1; 214.10, subdivision 10; 241.01, subdivision 3a; 241.021, subdivision 1d; 243.05, subdivision 1; 244.03; 244.05, subdivisions 1b, 2, 3, 4, 5, by adding a subdivision; 244.052, subdivision 4a; 244.101, subdivision 1; 244.19, subdivisions 1, 5; 244.195, subdivisions 1, 2, by adding subdivisions; 244.20; 244.21; 297I.06, subdivision 1; 299A.38; 299A.41, subdivisions 3, 4, by adding a subdivision; 299A.52; 299A.642, subdivision 15; 299A.73, by adding a subdivision; 299C.10, subdivision 1; 299C.106, subdivision 3; 299C.11, subdivision 3; 299C.111; 299C.17; 299C.53, subdivision 3; 299N.02, subdivision 3; 326.32, subdivision 10; 326.3381, subdivision 3; 357.021, subdivision 2; 363A.06, subdivision 1; 401.01; 401.02; 401.025, subdivision 1;


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401.06; 401.09; 401.10; 401.11; 401.14, subdivision 3; 401.16; 403.02, subdivisions 7, 9a, 11b, 16a, 17, 17c, 18, 19, 19a, 20, 20a, 21, by adding subdivisions; 403.025; 403.03, subdivision 2; 403.05; 403.06; 403.07; 403.08; 403.09, subdivision 2; 403.10, subdivisions 2, 3; 403.11; 403.113; 403.15, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, by adding a subdivision; 609.05, by adding a subdivision; 609.106, subdivision 2, by adding a subdivision; 609.11, subdivision 8, by adding a subdivision; 609.14, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 609.2231, subdivision 4; 609.2233; 609.3455, subdivisions 2, 5; 609.35; 609.52, subdivision 3; 609.527, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 609.582, subdivisions 3, 4; 609.595, subdivisions 1a, 2; 609.749, subdivision 3; 609A.01; 609A.02, subdivision 3; 609A.03, subdivisions 5, 7a, 9; 611.23; 611A.03, subdivision 1; 611A.211, subdivision 1; 611A.31, subdivisions 2, 3, by adding a subdivision; 611A.32; 626.15; 626.5531, subdivision 1; 626.843, by adding a subdivision; 626.8451, subdivision 1; 626.8469, subdivision 1; 626.8473, subdivision 3; 638.01; 641.15, subdivision 2; 641.155; Laws 2021, First Special Session chapter 11, article 1, section 15, subdivision 3; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 243; 244; 299A; 299C; 401; 609; 609A; 626; 638; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2022, sections 244.18; 244.19, subdivisions 6, 7, 8; 244.22; 244.24; 244.30; 299C.80, subdivision 7; 403.02, subdivision 13; 403.09, subdivision 3; 638.02; 638.03; 638.04; 638.05; 638.06; 638.07; 638.075; 638.08.

 

May 11, 2023

The Honorable Bobby Joe Champion

President of the Senate

 

The Honorable Melissa Hortman

Speaker of the House of Representatives

 

We, the undersigned conferees for S. F. No. 2909 report that we have agreed upon the items in dispute and recommend as follows:

 

That the House recede from its amendments and that S. F. No. 2909 be further amended as follows:

 

Delete everything after the enacting clause and insert:

 

"ARTICLE 1

JUDICIARY APPROPRIATIONS

 

      Section 1.  APPROPRIATIONS. 

 

The sums shown in the columns marked "Appropriations" are appropriated to the agencies and for the purposes specified in this article.  The appropriations are from the general fund, or another named fund, and are available for the fiscal years indicated for each purpose.  The figures "2024" and "2025" used in this article mean that the appropriations listed under them are available for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2024, or June 30, 2025, respectively.  "The first year" is fiscal year 2024.  "The second year" is fiscal year 2025.  "The biennium" is fiscal years 2024 and 2025.

 

 

 

 

APPROPRIATIONS

 

 

 

Available for the Year

 

 

 

Ending June 30

 

 

 

2024

2025

 

      Sec. 2.  SUPREME COURT

 

 

 

 

 

      Subdivision 1.  Total Appropriation

 

$80,141,000

 

$82,624,000

 

The amounts that may be spent for each purpose are specified in the following subdivisions.


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           Subd. 2.  Supreme Court Operations

 

46,581,000

 

49,064,000

 

(a) Contingent Account

 

$5,000 each year is for a contingent account for expenses necessary for the normal operation of the court for which no other reimbursement is provided.

 

(b) Justices' Compensation

 

Justices' compensation is increased by eight percent in the first year and four percent in the second year.

 

      Subd. 3.  Civil Legal Services

 

33,560,000

 

33,560,000

 

The general fund base is $34,167,000 beginning in fiscal year 2026.

 

Legal Services to Low-Income Clients in Family Law Matters

 

$1,017,000 each year is to improve the access of low-income clients to legal representation in family law matters.  This appropriation must be distributed under Minnesota Statutes, section 480.242, to the qualified legal services program described in Minnesota Statutes, section 480.242, subdivision 2, paragraph (a).  Any unencumbered balance remaining in the first year does not cancel and is available in the second year.

 

      Sec. 3.  COURT OF APPEALS

 

$14,559,000

 

$15,259,000

 

Judges' Compensation

 

Judges' compensation is increased by eight percent in the first year and four percent in the second year.

 

      Sec. 4.  DISTRICT COURTS

 

$370,910,000

 

$381,590,000

 

(a) Judges' Compensation

 

Judges' compensation is increased by eight percent in the first year and four percent in the second year.

 

(b) Court Case Backlog

 

$4,200,000 the first year is to address the court case backlog.

 

(c) Mandated Psychological Services

 

$1,500,000 each year is for mandated psychological services.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(d) New Treatment Courts

 

$422,000 each year is to fund four new treatment courts.


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(e) Courtroom Technology Enhancements

 

$7,400,000 the first year is for courtroom technology enhancements.

 

(f) Law Clerk Salary

 

$2,033,000 each year is to increase district court law clerks' salaries.  Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 16A.285, the court must not transfer this appropriation.

 

(g) Interpreter Pay

 

$200,000 each year is to fund the increase in the hourly fee paid to contract interpreters.

 

(h) Extreme Risk Protection Orders

 

$91,000 the first year and $182,000 the second year are to implement the provisions of article 14.

 

      Sec. 5.  GUARDIAN AD LITEM BOARD

 

$24,358,000

 

$25,620,000

 

      Sec. 6.  TAX COURT

 

$2,133,000

 

$2,268,000

 

      Sec. 7.  UNIFORM LAWS COMMISSION

 

$115,000

 

$115,000

 

      Sec. 8.  BOARD ON JUDICIAL STANDARDS

 

$655,000

 

$645,000

 

(a) Availability of Appropriation

 

If the appropriation for either year is insufficient, the appropriation for the other fiscal year is available.

 

(b) Major Disciplinary Actions

 

$125,000 each year is for special investigative and hearing costs for major disciplinary actions undertaken by the board.  This appropriation does not cancel.  Any unencumbered and unspent balances remain available for these expenditures through June 30, 2027.

 

      Sec. 9.  BOARD OF PUBLIC DEFENSE

 

$154,884,000

 

$164,360,000

 

      Sec. 10.  HUMAN RIGHTS

 

$8,048,000

 

$8,429,000

 

The general fund base is $8,909,000 beginning in fiscal year 2026.


Journal of the House - 70th Day - Monday, May 15, 2023 - Top of Page 7646

(a) Civil Rights Enforcement

 

$1,500,000 each year is for increased civil rights enforcement.  The base for this appropriation is $2,000,000 in fiscal year 2026 and thereafter.

 

(b) Mediator Payments

 

$20,000 each year is to fund payments to mediators.  This appropriation is onetime and is available through June 30, 2027.

 

(c) Report on Civil Rights Trends

 

$395,000 the first year and $250,000 the second year are to analyze and report on civil rights trends in Minnesota.

 

      Sec. 11.  OFFICE OF APPELLATE COUNSEL AND TRAINING

 

$659,000

 

 

$1,560,000

 

Establishment and Operations

 

$659,000 the first year and $1,560,000 the second year are for establishment and operation of the Statewide Office of Appellate Counsel and Training as described in Minnesota Statutes, section 260C.419, and to provide support for the State Board of Appellate Counsel and Training.

 

      Sec. 12.  DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

 

$1,500,000

 

$-0-

 

Child Advocacy Center

 

$1,500,000 the first year is for a grant to First Witness Child Advocacy Center for the acquisition and improvement of properties located at 1402, 1406, and 1412 East 2nd Street in the city of Duluth.  This appropriation includes money for demolition of the building located at 1412 East 2nd Street and construction of a parking lot, and for renovation, furnishing, and equipping of the buildings located at 1402 and 1406 East 2nd Street as a training center and a child advocacy center.  These funds are available until June 30, 2027.

 

Sec. 13.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 611.58, as amended by Laws 2023, chapter 14, section 34, is amended to read:

 

611.58 COMPETENCY ATTAINMENT CURRICULUM AND CERTIFICATION.

 

Subdivision 1.  Curriculum.  (a) By January October 1, 2023, the board must recommend a competency attainment curriculum to educate and assist defendants found incompetent in attaining the ability to:

 

(1) rationally consult with counsel;


Journal of the House - 70th Day - Monday, May 15, 2023 - Top of Page 7647

(2) understand the proceedings; and

 

(3) participate in the defense.

 

(b) The curriculum must be flexible enough to be delivered in community and correctional settings by individuals with various levels of education and qualifications, including but not limited to professionals in criminal justice, health care, mental health care, and social services.  The board must review and update the curriculum as needed.

 

Subd. 2.  Certification and distribution.  By January October 1, 2023, the board must develop a process for certifying individuals to deliver the competency attainment curriculum and make the curriculum available to every competency attainment program and forensic navigator in the state.  Each competency attainment program in the state must use the competency attainment curriculum under this section as the foundation for delivering competency attainment education and must not substantially alter the content.

 

Sec. 14.  Laws 2022, chapter 99, article 1, section 50, is amended to read:

 

Sec. 50.  EFFECTIVE DATE.

 

Sections 26 to 37 are effective July April 1, 2023 2024, and apply to competency determinations initiated on or after that date.

 

Sec. 15.  Laws 2022, chapter 99, article 3, section 1, as amended by Laws 2023, chapter 14, section 36, is amended to read:

 

Section 1.  APPROPRIATION BASE ESTABLISHED; COMPETENCY ATTAINMENT.

 

Subdivision 1.  Department of Corrections.  The general fund appropriation base for the commissioner of corrections is $202,000 in fiscal year 2024 and $202,000 in fiscal year 2025 for correctional facilities inspectors.

 

Subd. 2.  District courts.  The general fund appropriation base for the district courts is $5,042,000 $1,500,000 in fiscal year 2024 and $5,042,000 in fiscal year 2025 for costs associated with additional competency examination costs.

 

Subd. 3.  State Competency Attainment Board.  The general fund appropriation base for the State Competency Attainment Board is $11,350,000 $3,515,000 in fiscal year 2024 and $10,900,000 in fiscal year 2025 for staffing and other costs needed to establish and perform the duties of the State Competency Attainment Board, including providing educational services necessary to assist defendants in attaining competency, or contracting or partnering with other organizations to provide those services.

 

ARTICLE 2

PUBLIC SAFETY APPROPRIATIONS

 

      Section 1.  APPROPRIATIONS. 

 

The sums shown in the columns marked "Appropriations" are appropriated to the agencies and for the purposes specified in this article.  The appropriations are from the general fund, or another named fund, and are available for the fiscal years indicated for each purpose.  The figures "2024" and "2025" used in this article mean that the appropriations listed under them are available for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2024, or June 30, 2025, respectively.  "The first year" is fiscal year 2024.  "The second year" is fiscal year 2025.  "The biennium" is fiscal years 2024 and 2025.  Appropriations for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2023, are effective the day following final enactment.


Journal of the House - 70th Day - Monday, May 15, 2023 - Top of Page 7648

 

 

APPROPRIATIONS

 

 

 

Available for the Year

 

 

 

Ending June 30

 

 

2023

2024

2025

 

      Sec. 2.  SENTENCING GUIDELINES

 

$1,549,000

 

$1,488,000

 

(a) Analysis of Sentencing-Related Data

 

$125,000 the first year and $124,000 the second year are to expand analysis of sentencing-related data.

 

(b) Small Agency Resource Team (SmART)

 

$50,000 each year is for the commission's accounting, budgeting, and human resources to be provided by the Department of Administration's small agency resource team.

 

(c) Court Information System Integration

 

$340,000 the first year and $348,000 the second year are to fully integrate the Sentencing Guidelines information systems with the Minnesota Criminal Information System (MNCIS).  The base for this appropriation is $78,000 beginning in fiscal year 2026.

 

(d) Comprehensive Review of the Guidelines

 

$243,000 the first year and $147,000 the second year are to begin a comprehensive review of the Sentencing Guidelines.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

      Sec. 3.  PUBLIC SAFETY

 

 

 

 

 

      Subdivision 1.  Total Appropriation

$1,000,000

 

$333,079,000

 

$292,622,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2023

2024

2025

 

General

1,000,000

235,025,000

201,039,000

Special Revenue

 

20,074,000

20,327,000

State Government

 Special Revenue

 

 

103,000

 

103,000

Environmental

 

119,000

127,000

Trunk Highway

 

2,429,000

2,429,000

911 Fund

 

75,329,000

68,597,000

 

The amounts that may be spent for each purpose are specified in the following subdivisions.


Journal of the House - 70th Day - Monday, May 15, 2023 - Top of Page 7649

      Subd. 2.  Public Safety Administration

 

1,000,000

 

 

2,250,000

 

 

2,000,000

 

(a) Public Safety Officer Survivor Benefits

 

$1,000,000 in fiscal year 2023, $1,000,000 in fiscal year 2024, and $1,000,000 in fiscal year 2025 are for payment of public safety officer survivor benefits under Minnesota Statutes, section 299A.44.  If the appropriation for either year is insufficient, the appropriation for the other year is available.

 

(b) Soft Body Armor Reimbursements

 

$1,000,000 each year is for increases in the base appropriation for soft body armor reimbursements under Minnesota Statutes, section 299A.38.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(c) Firearm Storage Grants

 

$250,000 the first year is for grants to local or state law enforcement agencies to support the safe and secure storage of firearms owned by persons subject to extreme risk protection orders.  The commissioner must apply for a grant from the Byrne State Crisis Intervention Program to supplement the funds appropriated by the legislature for implementation of Minnesota Statutes, sections 624.7171 to 624.7178 and 626.8481.  Of the federal funds received, the commissioner must dedicate at least an amount that is equal to this appropriation to fund safe and secure firearms storage grants provided for under this paragraph.

 

      Subd. 3.  Emergency Management

 

7,330,000

 

4,417,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

General

7,211,000

4,290,000

Environmental

119,000

127,000

 

(a) Supplemental Nonprofit Security Grants

 

$250,000 each year is for supplemental nonprofit security grants under this paragraph.  This appropriation is onetime.

 

Nonprofit organizations whose applications for funding through the Federal Emergency Management Agency's nonprofit security grant program have been approved by the Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management are eligible for grants under this paragraph.  No additional application shall be required for grants under this paragraph, and an application for a grant from the federal program is also an application for funding from the state supplemental program.


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Eligible organizations may receive grants of up to $75,000, except that the total received by any individual from both the federal nonprofit security grant program and the state supplemental nonprofit security grant program shall not exceed $75,000.  Grants shall be awarded in an order consistent with the ranking given to applicants for the federal nonprofit security grant program.  No grants under the state supplemental nonprofit security grant program shall be awarded until the announcement of the recipients and the amount of the grants awarded under the federal nonprofit security grant program.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(b) Emergency Preparedness Staff

 

$550,000 each year is for additional emergency preparedness staff members.

 

(c) Lake Superior Chippewa Tribal Emergency Management Coordinator

 

$145,000 each year is for a grant to the Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippewa to establish and maintain a Tribal emergency management coordinator under Minnesota Statutes, section 12.25.

 

(d) Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Tribe Coast Guard Services

 

$3,000,000 the first year is for a grant to the Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippewa to purchase equipment and fund a position for coast guard services off the north shore of Lake Superior.

 

      Subd. 4.  Criminal Apprehension

123,122,000

 

106,870,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

General

120,686,000

104,434,000

State Government

 Special Revenue

 

7,000

 

7,000

Trunk Highway

2,429,000

2,429,000

 

The annual base from the general fund is $104,303,000 beginning in fiscal year 2026.

 

(a) DWI Lab Analysis; Trunk Highway Fund

 

Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 161.20, subdivision 3, $2,429,000 the first year and $2,429,000 the second year are from the trunk highway fund for staff and operating costs for laboratory analysis related to driving-while-impaired cases.


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(b) Use of Force Investigations

 

$4,419,000 each year is for operation of the independent Use of Force Investigations Unit pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 299C.80.

 

(c) FBI Compliance, Critical IT Infrastructure, and Cybersecurity Upgrades

 

$10,550,000 the first year and $2,737,000 the second year are for cybersecurity investments, critical infrastructure upgrades, and Federal Bureau of Investigation audit compliance.  This appropriation is available through June 30, 2027.

 

(d) Expungement-Related Costs

 

$3,737,000 the first year and $190,000 the second year are for costs associated with the changes to expungement law made in this act.

 

(e) Violent Crime Reduction Strategy

 

$9,325,000 each year is for violent crime reduction, including forensics, and analytical and operational support.

 

(f) Investigative Partnerships

 

$6,000,000 the first year is to fund partnerships among local, state, and federal agencies.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2027.

 

(g) Firearm Eligibility Background Checks

 

$70,000 the first year is to purchase and integrate information technology hardware and software necessary to process additional firearms eligibility background checks.

 

(h) Human Trafficking Task Force

 

$1,800,000 each year is for staff and operating costs to support the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension-led Minnesota Human Trafficking Investigator's Task Force.

 

(i) Report on Fusion Center Activities

 

$115,000 each year is for the report required under Minnesota Statutes, section 299C.055.  This is a onetime appropriation.


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(j) Decrease Forensic Evidence Turnaround

 

$4,500,000 the first year and $3,500,000 the second year are to decrease turnaround times for forensic processing of evidence in criminal investigations for state and local law enforcement partners.

 

Additional staff and supplies funded under this provision are intended, among other purposes, to reduce the backlog in sexual assault examination kit testing, to prevent the development of any future backlogs in testing sexual assault examination kits, and to provide survivors access to the status of the testing of their exam kits via the relevant exam testing tracking systems.  By January 1, 2025, and each year thereafter, the commissioner must submit a report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the house of representatives and senate committees with jurisdiction over public safety finance and policy on the use of these funds in the previous fiscal year.  The report must:  (1) include the data necessary to understand sexual assault examination kit testing times; and (2) identify the barriers to testing all sexual assault examination kits within 90 days of receipt by the laboratory in the preceding year and in the upcoming year.

 

      Subd. 5.  Fire Marshal

 

17,013,000

 

17,272,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

General

4,184,000

4,190,000

Special Revenue

12,829,000

13,082,000

 

The special revenue fund appropriation is from the fire safety account in the special revenue fund and is for activities under Minnesota Statutes, section 299F.012.  The base appropriation for this account is $13,182,000 in fiscal year 2026 and $13,082,000 in fiscal year 2027.

 

(a) Hazardous Materials and Emergency Response Teams

 

$1,695,000 the first year and $1,595,000 the second year are from the fire safety account for hazardous materials and emergency response teams.  The base for these purposes is $1,695,000 in the first year of future biennia and $1,595,000 in the second year of future biennia.

 

(b) Bomb Squad Reimbursements

 

$250,000 from the fire safety account and $50,000 from the general fund each year are for reimbursements to local governments for bomb squad services.


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(c) Nonresponsible Party Reimbursements

 

$750,000 each year from the fire safety account is for nonresponsible party hazardous material and bomb squad incident reimbursements.  Money appropriated for this purpose is available for one year.

 

(d) Hometown Heroes Assistance Program

 

$4,000,000 each year from the general fund is for grants to the Minnesota Firefighter Initiative to fund the hometown heroes assistance program established in Minnesota Statutes, section 299A.477.

 

      Subd. 6.  Firefighter Training and Education Board

 

7,175,000

 

7,175,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

Special Revenue

7,175,000

7,175,000

 

The special revenue fund appropriation is from the fire safety account in the special revenue fund and is for activities under Minnesota Statutes, section 299F.012.

 

(a) Firefighter Training and Education

 

 

 

 

 

$5,500,000 each year from the fire safety account is for firefighter training and education.

 

(b) Task Force 1

 

$1,125,000 each year is for the Minnesota Task Force 1.

 

(c) Task Force 2

 

$200,000 each year is for Minnesota Task Force 2.

 

(d) Air Rescue

 

$350,000 each year is for the Minnesota Air Rescue Team.

 

(e) Unappropriated Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

Any additional unappropriated money collected in fiscal year 2023 is appropriated to the commissioner of public safety for the purposes of Minnesota Statutes, section 299F.012.  The commissioner may transfer appropriations and base amounts between activities in this subdivision.


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           Subd. 7.  Alcohol and Gambling Enforcement

4,102,000

 

3,857,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

General

4,032,000

3,787,000

Special Revenue

70,000

70,000

 

(a) $70,000 each year is from the lawful gambling regulation account in the special revenue fund.

 

(b) $600,000 the first year and $100,000 the second year are for enforcement information technology improvements.

 

      Subd. 8.  Office of Justice Programs

 

94,758,000

 

80,434,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

General

94,662,000

80,338,000

State Government  

 Special Revenue

 

96,000

 

96,000

 

(a) Domestic and Sexual Violence Housing

 

$1,500,000 each year is to establish a Domestic Violence Housing First grant program to provide resources for survivors of violence to access safe and stable housing and for staff to provide mobile advocacy and expertise in housing resources in their community and a Minnesota Domestic and Sexual Violence Transitional Housing program to develop and support medium to long term transitional housing for survivors of domestic and sexual violence with supportive services.  The base for this appropriation is $1,000,000 beginning in fiscal year 2026.

 

(b) Federal Victims of Crime Funding Gap

 

$11,000,000 each year is to fund services for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, child abuse, and other crimes.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(c) Office for Missing and Murdered Black Women and Girls

 

$1,248,000 each year is to establish and maintain the Minnesota Office for Missing and Murdered Black Women and Girls.

 

(d) Increased Staffing

 

$667,000 the first year and $1,334,000 the second year are to increase staffing in the Office of Justice Programs for grant monitoring and compliance; provide training and technical assistance to grantees and potential grantees; conduct community


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outreach and engagement to improve the experiences and outcomes of applicants, grant recipients, and crime victims throughout Minnesota; expand the Minnesota Statistical Analysis Center; and increase staffing for the crime victim reimbursement program and the Crime Victim Justice Unit.

 

(e) Office of Restorative Practices

 

$500,000 each year is to establish and maintain the Office of Restorative Practices.

 

(f) Crossover and Dual-Status Youth Model Grants

 

$1,000,000 each year is to provide grants to local units of government to initiate or expand crossover youth practices model and dual-status youth programs that provide services for youth who are involved with or at risk of becoming involved with both the child welfare and juvenile justice systems, in accordance with the Robert F. Kennedy National Resource Center for Juvenile Justice model.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(g) Restorative Practices Initiatives Grants

 

$4,000,000 each year is for grants to establish and support restorative practices initiatives pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 299A.95, subdivision 6.  The base for this appropriation is $2,500,000 beginning in fiscal year 2026.

 

(h) Ramsey County Youth Treatment Homes Acquisition and Betterment

 

$5,000,000 the first year is for a grant to Ramsey County to establish, with input from community stakeholders, including impacted youth and families, up to seven intensive trauma‑informed therapeutic treatment homes in Ramsey County that are licensed by the Department of Human Services, that are culturally specific, that are community-based, and that can be secured.  These residential spaces must provide intensive treatment and intentional healing for youth as ordered by the court as part of the disposition of a case in juvenile court.

 

(i) Ramsey County Violence Prevention

 

$5,000,000 the first year is for a grant to Ramsey County to award grants to develop new and further enhance existing community-based organizational support through violence prevention and community wellness grants.  Grantees must use the money to create family support groups and resources to support families during the time a young person is placed out of home following a juvenile delinquency adjudication and support the family through the period of postplacement reentry; create community-based


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respite options for conflict or crisis de-escalation to prevent incarceration or further systems involvement for families; or establish additional meaningful employment opportunities for systems-involved youth.  This appropriation is available through June 30, 2027.

 

(j) Office for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Relatives

 

$274,000 each year is for increased staff and operating costs of the Office for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Relatives, the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Relatives Advisory Board, and the Gaagige-Mikwendaagoziwag reward advisory group.

 

(k) Youth Intervention Programs

 

$3,525,000 the first year and $3,526,000 the second year are for youth intervention programs under Minnesota Statutes, section 299A.73.  The base for this appropriation is $3,526,000 in fiscal year 2026 and $3,525,000 in fiscal year 2027.

 

(l) Community Crime Intervention and Prevention Grants

 

$750,000 each year is for community crime intervention and prevention program grants, authorized under Minnesota Statutes, section 299A.296.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(m) Resources for Victims of Crime

 

$1,000,000 each year is for general crime victim grants to meet the needs of victims of crime not covered by domestic violence, sexual assault, or child abuse services.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(n) Prosecutor Training

 

$100,000 each year is for a grant to the Minnesota County Attorneys Association to be used for prosecutorial and law enforcement training, including trial school training and train‑the‑trainer courses.  All training funded with grant proceeds must contain blocks of instruction on racial disparities in the criminal justice system, collateral consequences to criminal convictions, and trauma-informed responses to victims.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

The Minnesota County Attorneys Association must report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees with jurisdiction over public safety policy and finance on the training provided with grant proceeds, including a description of each training and the number of prosecutors and law enforcement officers who received training.  The report is due by February 15, 2025.  The report may include trainings scheduled to be completed after the date of submission with an estimate of expected participants.


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(o) Minnesota Heals

 

$500,000 each year is for the Minnesota Heals grant program.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(p) Sexual Assault Exam Costs

 

$3,967,000 the first year and $3,767,000 the second year are to reimburse qualified health care providers for the expenses associated with medical examinations administered to victims of criminal sexual conduct as required under Minnesota Statutes, section 609.35.  The base for this appropriation is $3,771,000 in fiscal year 2026 and $3,776,000 in fiscal year 2027.

 

(q) First Responder Mental Health Curriculum

 

$75,000 each year is for a grant to the Adler graduate school.  The grantee must use the grant to develop a curriculum for a 24‑week certificate to train licensed therapists to understand the nuances, culture, and stressors of the work environments of first responders to allow those therapists to provide effective treatment to first responders in distress.  The grantee must collaborate with first responders who are familiar with the psychological, cultural, and professional issues of their field to develop the curriculum and promote it upon completion.

 

The grantee may provide the program online.

 

The grantee must seek to recruit additional participants from outside the 11-county metropolitan area.

 

The grantee must create a resource directory to provide law enforcement agencies with names of counselors who complete the program and other resources to support law enforcement professionals with overall wellness.  The grantee shall collaborate with the Department of Public Safety and law enforcement organizations to promote the directory.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(r) Pathways to Policing

 

$400,000 each year is for reimbursement grants to state and local law enforcement agencies that operate pathway to policing programs.  Applicants for reimbursement grants may receive up to 50 percent of the cost of compensating and training program participants.  Reimbursement grants shall be proportionally allocated based on the number of grant applications approved by the commissioner.  This is a onetime appropriation.


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(s) Direct Assistance to Crime Victim Survivors

 

$5,000,000 each year is to provide grants for direct services and advocacy for victims of sexual assault, general crime, domestic violence, and child abuse.  Funding must support the direct needs of organizations serving victims of crime by providing:  direct client assistance to crime victims; competitive wages for direct service staff; hotel stays and other housing-related supports and services; culturally responsive programming; prevention programming, including domestic abuse transformation and restorative justice programming; and for other needs of organizations and crime victim survivors.  Services funded must include services for victims of crime in underserved communities most impacted by violence and reflect the ethnic, racial, economic, cultural, and geographic diversity of the state.  The office shall prioritize culturally specific programs, or organizations led and staffed by persons of color that primarily serve communities of color, when allocating funds.

 

(t) Racially Diverse Youth

 

$250,000 each year is for grants to organizations to address racial disparity of youth using shelter services in the Rochester and St. Cloud regional areas.  Of this amount, $125,000 each year is to address this issue in the Rochester area and $125,000 each year is to address this issue in the St. Cloud area.  A grant recipient shall establish and operate a pilot program connected to shelter services to engage in community intervention outreach, mobile case management, family reunification, aftercare, and follow up when family members are released from shelter services.  A pilot program must specifically address the high number of racially diverse youth that enter shelters in the regions.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(u) Violence Prevention Project Research Center

 

$500,000 each year is for a grant to the Violence Prevention Project Research Center, operating as a 501(c)(3) organization, for research focused on reducing violence in society that uses data and analysis to improve criminal justice-related policy and practice in Minnesota.  Research must place an emphasis on issues related to deaths and injuries involving firearms.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

Beginning January 15, 2025, the Violence Prevention Project Research Center must submit an annual report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees with jurisdiction over public safety policy and finance on its work and findings.  The report must include a description of the data reviewed, an analysis of that data, and recommendations to improve criminal justice-related policy and practice in Minnesota with specific recommendations to address deaths and injuries involving firearms.


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(v) Report on Approaches to Address Illicit Drug Use in Minnesota

 

$118,000 each year is to enter into an agreement with Rise Research LLC for a study and set of reports on illicit drug use in Minnesota describing current responses to that use, reviewing alternative approaches utilized in other jurisdictions, and making policy and funding recommendations for a holistic and effective response to illicit drug use and the illicit drug trade.  The agreement must establish a budget and schedule with clear deliverables.  This appropriation is onetime.

 

The study must include a review of current policies, practices, and funding; identification of alternative approaches utilized effectively in other jurisdictions; and policy and funding recommendations for a response to illicit drug use and the illicit drug trade that reduces and, where possible, prevents harm and expands individual and community health, safety, and autonomy.  Recommendations must consider impacts on public safety, racial equity, accessibility of health and ancillary supportive social services, and the intersections between drug policy and mental health, housing and homelessness, overdose and infectious disease, child welfare, and employment.

 

Rise Research may subcontract and coordinate with other organizations or individuals to conduct research, provide analysis, and prepare the reports required by this section.

 

Rise Research shall submit reports to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees with jurisdiction over public safety finance and policy, human services finance and policy, health finance and policy, and judiciary finance and policy.  Rise Research shall submit an initial report by February 15, 2024, and a final report by March 1, 2025.

 

(w) Legal Representation for Children

 

$150,000 each year is for a grant to an organization that provides legal representation for children in need of protection or services and children in out-of-home placement.  The grant is contingent upon a match in an equal amount from nonstate funds.  The match may be in kind, including the value of volunteer attorney time, in cash, or a combination of the two.  These appropriations are in addition to any other appropriations for the legal representation of children.  This appropriation is onetime.

 

(x) Pretrial Release Study and Report

 

$250,000 each year are for a grant to the Minnesota Justice Research Center to study and report on pretrial release practices in Minnesota and other jurisdictions, including but not limited to the use of bail as a condition of pretrial release.  This appropriation is onetime.


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(y) Intensive Comprehensive Peace Officer Education and Training Program

 

$5,000,000 the first year is to implement the intensive comprehensive peace officer education and training program described in Minnesota Statutes, section 626.8516.  This appropriation is available through June 30, 2027.

 

(z) Youth Services Office

 

$250,000 each year is to operate the Youth Services Office.

 

      Subd. 9.  Emergency Communication Networks

 

77,329,000

 

70,597,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

General

2,000,000

2,000,000

911 Fund

75,329,000

68,597,000

 

This appropriation is from the state government special revenue fund for 911 emergency telecommunications services unless otherwise indicated.

 

(a) Public Safety Answering Points

 

 

 

 

 

$28,011,000 the first year and $28,011,000 the second year shall be distributed as provided under Minnesota Statutes, section 403.113, subdivision 2.

 

(b) Transition to Next Generation 911

 

$7,000,000 the first year is to support Public Safety Answering Points' transition to Next Generation 911.  Funds may be used for planning, cybersecurity, GIS data collection and maintenance, 911 call processing equipment, and new Public Safety Answering Point technology to improve service delivery.  Funds shall be distributed by October 1, 2023, as provided in Minnesota Statutes, section 403.113, subdivision 2.  Funds are available until June 30, 2025, and any unspent funds must be returned to the 911 emergency telecommunications service account.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

Each eligible entity receiving these funds must provide a detailed report on how the funds were used to the commissioner of public safety by August 1, 2025.

 

(c) ARMER State Backbone Operating Costs

 

$10,116,000 the first year and $10,384,000 the second year are transferred to the commissioner of transportation for costs of maintaining and operating the statewide radio system backbone.


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(d) Statewide Emergency Communications Board

 

$1,000,000 each year is to the Statewide Emergency Communications Board.  Funds may be used for operating costs, to provide competitive grants to local units of government to fund enhancements to a communication system, technology, or support activity that directly provides the ability to deliver the 911 call between the entry point to the 911 system and the first responder, and to further the strategic goals set forth by the SECB Statewide Communication Interoperability Plan.

 

(e) Statewide Public Safety Radio Communication System Equipment Grants

 

$2,000,000 each year from the general fund is for grants to local units of government, federally recognized Tribal entities, and state agencies participating in the statewide Allied Radio Matrix for Emergency Response (ARMER) public safety radio communication system established under Minnesota Statutes, section 403.36, subdivision 1e.  The grants must be used to purchase or upgrade portable radios, mobile radios, and related equipment that is interoperable with the ARMER system.  Each local government unit may receive only one grant.  The grant is contingent upon a match of at least five percent from nonstate funds.  The director of the Department of Public Safety Emergency Communication Networks division, in consultation with the Statewide Emergency Communications Board, must administer the grant program.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2026.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

      Sec. 4.  PEACE OFFICER STANDARDS AND TRAINING (POST) BOARD

 

$12,863,000

 

 

$12,717,000

 

(a) Peace Officer Training Reimbursements

 

$2,949,000 each year is for reimbursements to local governments for peace officer training costs.

 

(b) Additional Staff

 

$1,027,000 the first year and $1,028,000 the second year are for additional staff and equipment.  The base for this appropriation is $1,011,000 beginning in fiscal year 2026.

 

(c) Additional Office Space

 

$228,000 the first year and $30,000 the second year are for additional office space.


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           Sec. 5.  PRIVATE DETECTIVE BOARD

 

$758,000

 

$688,000

 

      Sec. 6.  CORRECTIONS

 

 

 

 

 

      Subdivision 1.  Total Appropriation

$12,643,000

 

$797,937,000

 

$826,661,000

 

The amounts that may be spent for each purpose are specified in the following subdivisions.

 

      Subd. 2.  Incarceration and Prerelease Services

 

$12,643,000

 

 

$534,412,000

 

 

$561,421,000

 

(a) Operating Deficiency

 

$12,643,000 in fiscal year 2023 is to meet financial obligations in fiscal year 2023.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(b) Body-worn Camera Program

 

$1,000,000 each year is to create a body-worn camera program for corrections officers and intensive supervised release agents.  This appropriation is onetime.

 

(c) ARMER Radio System

 

$1,500,000 each year is to upgrade and maintain the ARMER radio system within correctional facilities.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(d) Prison Rape Elimination Act

 

$500,000 each year is for Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) compliance.

 

(e) State Corrections Safety and Security

 

$1,932,000 each year is for state corrections safety and security investments.  The base for this appropriation is $2,625,000 beginning in fiscal year 2026.

 

(f) Health Services

 

$2,750,000 each year is for increased health care services.  The base for this appropriation is $3,400,000 beginning in fiscal year 2026.

 

(g) Educational Programming and Support Services

 

$5,600,000 the first year and $4,000,000 the second year are for educational programming and support services.  The base for this purpose is $2,000,000 beginning in fiscal year 2026.


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(h) Family Support Unit

 

$480,000 each year is for a family support unit.

 

(i) Inmate Phone Calls

 

$3,100,000 each year is to provide voice communication services for incarcerated persons under Minnesota Statutes, section 241.252.  Any unencumbered balance remaining at the end of the first year may be carried forward into the second year.  If this appropriation is greater than the cost of providing voice communication services, remaining funds must be used to offset the cost of other communication services.

 

(j) Virtual Court Coordination

 

$500,000 each year is for virtual court coordination and modernization.

 

(k) Supportive Arts for Incarcerated Persons

 

$425,000 the first year is for supportive arts for incarcerated persons grants as provided for in section 17.  Of this amount, up to ten percent is for administration, including facility space, access, liaison, and monitoring.  Any unencumbered balance remaining at the end of the first year does not cancel but is available for this purpose in the second year.

 

(l) Successful Re-entry

 

$375,000 the first year and $875,000 the second year are for reentry initiatives, including a culturally specific release program for Native American incarcerated individuals.

 

(m) Evidence-based Correctional Practices Unit

 

$750,000 each year is to establish and maintain a unit to direct and oversee the use of evidence-based correctional practices across the department and supervision delivery systems.

 

(n) Interstate Compact for Adult Supervision; Transfer Expense Reimbursement

 

$250,000 each year is for reimbursements under Minnesota Statutes, section 243.1609.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(o) Task Force on Aiding and Abetting Felony Murder

 

$25,000 the first year is for costs associated with the revival of the task force on aiding and abetting felony murder.


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(p) Incarceration and Prerelease Services Base Budget

 

The base for incarceration and prerelease services is $552,775,000 in fiscal year 2026 and $553,043,000 in fiscal year 2027.

 

      Subd. 3.  Community Supervision and Postrelease Services

189,939,000

 

190,953,000

 

(a) Community Supervision Funding

 

$143,378,000 each year is for community supervision services.  This appropriation shall be distributed according to the community supervision formula in Minnesota Statutes, section 401.10.

 

(b) Tribal Nation Supervision

 

$2,750,000 each year is for Tribal Nations to provide supervision or supportive services pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 401.10.

 

(c) Postrelease Sex Offender Program

 

$1,915,000 each year is for postrelease sex offender treatment services and initiatives.

 

(d) Community Supervision Advisory Committee

 

$75,000 the first year is to fund the community supervision advisory committee under Minnesota Statutes, section 401.17.

 

(e) Regional and County Jails Study and Report

 

$150,000 the first year is to fund the commissioner's study and report on the consolidation or merger of county jails and alternatives to incarceration for persons experiencing mental health disorders.

 

(f) Work Release Programs

 

$500,000 each year is for work release programs. 

 

(g) County Discharge Plans

 

$80,000 each year is to develop model discharge plans pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 641.155.  This appropriation is onetime.

 

(h) Housing Initiatives

 

$2,130,000 each year is for housing initiatives to support stable housing of incarcerated individuals upon release.  The base for this purpose beginning in fiscal year 2026 is $1,685,000.  Of this amount:

 

(1) $1,000,000 each year is for housing stabilization prerelease services and program evaluation.  The base for this purpose beginning in fiscal year 2026 is $760,000;


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(2) $500,000 each year is for rental assistance for incarcerated individuals approaching release, on supervised release, or on probation who are at risk of homelessness;

 

(3) $405,000 each year is for culturally responsive trauma‑informed transitional housing.  The base for this purpose beginning in fiscal year 2026 is $200,000; and

 

(4) $225,000 each year is for housing coordination activities.

 

(i) Community Supervision and Postrelease Services Base Budget

 

The base for community supervision and postrelease services is $189,272,000 in fiscal year 2026 and $189,172,000 in fiscal year 2027.

 

(j) Naloxone

 

$2,000 each year is to purchase naloxone for supervised release agents to use to respond to overdoses.

 

      Subd. 4.  Organizational, Regulatory, and Administrative Services

 

73,586,000

 

 

74,287,000

 

(a) Public Safety Data Infrastructure

 

$22,914,000 the first year and $22,915,000 the second year are for technology modernization and the development of an information-sharing and data-technology infrastructure.  The base for this purpose is $4,097,000 beginning in fiscal year 2026.  Any unspent funds from the current biennium do not cancel and are available in the next biennium. 

 

(b) Supervised Release Board

 

$40,000 each year is to establish and operate the supervised release board pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 244.049.

 

(c) Recruitment and Retention

 

$3,200,000 the first year and $400,000 the second year are for recruitment and retention initiatives.  Of this amount, $2,800,000 the first year is for staff recruitment, professional development, conflict resolution, and staff wellness, and to contract with community collaborative partners who specialize in trauma recovery.


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(d) Clemency Review Commission

 

$986,000 each year is for the clemency review commission described in Minnesota Statutes, section 638.09.  Of this amount, $200,000 each year is for grants to support outreach and clemency application assistance.

 

(e) Accountability and Transparency

 

$1,000,000 each year is for accountability and transparency initiatives.  The base for this appropriation is $1,480,000 beginning in fiscal year 2026.

 

(f) Organizational, Regulatory, and Administrative Services Base Budget

 

The base for organizational, regulatory, and administrative services is $55,849,000 in fiscal year 2026 and $55,649,000 in fiscal year 2027.

 

      Sec. 7.  OMBUDSPERSON FOR CORRECTIONS

 

$1,105,000

 

$1,099,000

 

      Sec. 8.  BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE MINNESOTA STATE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

 

$500,000

 

 

$500,000

 

$500,000 each year is for transfer to Metropolitan State University.  Of this amount, $280,000 each year is to provide juvenile justice services and resources, including the Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative, to Minnesota counties and federally recognized Tribes and $220,000 each year is for funding to local units of government, federally recognized Tribes, and agencies to support local Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiatives, including but not limited to Alternatives to Detention.  The unencumbered balance in the first year of the biennium does not cancel but is available throughout the biennium.

 

      Sec. 9.  DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES

$73,000

 

$9,000

 

$73,000 the first year and $9,000 the second year are to provide naloxone and training in the use of naloxone to conservation officers.

 

Sec. 10.  Laws 2021, First Special Session chapter 11, article 1, section 15, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

      Subd. 3.  Peace Officer Training Assistance

 

 

 

 

 

Philando Castile Memorial Training Fund $6,000,000 each year is to support and strengthen law enforcement training and implement best practices.  This funding shall be named the "Philando Castile Memorial Training Fund."  These funds may


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only be used to reimburse costs related to training courses that qualify for reimbursement under Minnesota Statutes, sections 626.8452 (use of force), 626.8469 (training in crisis response, conflict management, and cultural diversity), and 626.8474 (autism training).

 

Each sponsor of a training course is required to include the following in the sponsor's application for approval submitted to the board:  course goals and objectives; a course outline including at a minimum a timeline and teaching hours for all courses; instructor qualifications, including skills and concepts such as crisis intervention, de-escalation, and cultural competency that are relevant to the course provided; and a plan for learning assessments of the course and documenting the assessments to the board during review.  Upon completion of each course, instructors must submit student evaluations of the instructor's teaching to the sponsor.

 

The board shall keep records of the applications of all approved and denied courses.  All continuing education courses shall be reviewed after the first year.  The board must set a timetable for recurring review after the first year.  For each review, the sponsor must submit its learning assessments to the board to show that the course is teaching the learning outcomes that were approved by the board.

 

A list of licensees who successfully complete the course shall be maintained by the sponsor and transmitted to the board following the presentation of the course and the completed student evaluations of the instructors.  Evaluations are available to chief law enforcement officers.  The board shall establish a data retention schedule for the information collected in this section.

 

Each year, if funds are available after reimbursing all eligible requests for courses approved by the board under this subdivision, the board may use the funds to reimburse law enforcement agencies for other board-approved law enforcement training courses.  The base for this activity is $0 in fiscal year 2026 and thereafter.

 

Sec. 11.  GAAGIGE-MIKWENDAAGOZIWAG REWARD ACCOUNT; TRANSFER.

 

$250,000 in fiscal year 2024 is transferred from the general fund to the Gaagige-Mikwendaagoziwag reward account in the special revenue fund.

 

Sec. 12.  COMMUNITY CRIME AND VIOLENCE PREVENTION ACCOUNT; TRANSFER.

 

$70,000,000 in fiscal year 2024 is transferred from the general fund to the community crime and violence prevention account in the special revenue fund.


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Sec. 13.  COMMUNITY CRIME AND VIOLENCE PREVENTION GRANTS; SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNT; APPROPRIATION.

 

The community crime and violence prevention account is created in the special revenue fund consisting of money deposited, donated, allotted, transferred, or otherwise provided to the account.  Of the amount in the account, up to $14,000,000 each year is appropriated to the commissioner of public safety for purposes specified in Minnesota Statutes, section 299A.296.

 

Sec. 14.  CRISIS RESPONSE ACCOUNT; TRANSFER.

 

$10,000,000 in fiscal year 2024 is transferred from the general fund to the crisis response account in the special revenue fund.  Any balance in the account on June 30, 2028, cancels to the general fund.

 

Sec. 15.  CRISIS RESPONSE GRANTS; SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNT; APPROPRIATION.

 

The crisis response account is created in the special revenue fund consisting of money deposited, donated, allotted, transferred, or otherwise provided to the account.  Of the amount in the account, up to $2,000,000 in each of fiscal years 2024, 2025, 2026, 2027, and 2028 are appropriated to the commissioner of public safety for grants administered by the Office of Justice Programs to be awarded to local law enforcement agencies and local governments to maintain or expand crisis response teams in which social workers or mental health providers are sent as first responders when calls for service indicate that an individual is having a mental health crisis.

 

Sec. 16.  PRETRIAL RELEASE STUDY AND REPORT.

 

(a) Pursuant to the terms of a grant, the Minnesota Justice Research Center shall study and report on pretrial release practices in Minnesota and other jurisdictions.

 

(b) The Minnesota Justice Research Center shall examine pretrial release practices in Minnesota and community perspectives about those practices; conduct a robust study of pretrial release practices in other jurisdictions to identify effective approaches to pretrial release that use identified best practices; provide analysis and recommendations describing if, and how, practices in other jurisdictions could be adopted and implemented in Minnesota, including but not limited to analysis addressing how changes would impact public safety, appearance rates, treatment of defendants with different financial means, disparities in pretrial detention, and community perspectives about pretrial release; and make recommendations for policy changes for consideration by the legislature.

 

(c) By February 15, 2024, the Minnesota Justice Research Center must provide a preliminary report to the legislative committees and divisions with jurisdiction over public safety finance and policy including a summary of the preliminary findings, any legislative proposals to improve the ability of the Minnesota Justice Research Center to complete its work, and any proposals for legislation related to pretrial release.  The Minnesota Justice Research Center shall submit a final report to the legislative committees and divisions with jurisdiction over public safety finance and policy by February 15, 2025.  The final report shall include a description of the Minnesota Justice Research Center's work, findings, and any legislative proposals.

 

Sec. 17.  SUPPORTIVE ARTS GRANT PROGRAM.

 

(a) The commissioner of corrections shall establish a supportive arts grant program to award grants to nonprofit organizations to provide supportive arts programs to incarcerated persons and persons on supervised release.  The supportive arts programs must use the arts, including but not limited to visual art, poetry, literature, theater, dance, and music, to address the supportive, therapeutic, and rehabilitative needs of incarcerated persons and persons on supervised release and promote a safer correctional facility environment and community environment.  The commissioner may not require incarcerated persons and persons on supervised release to participate in a supportive arts program provided in a correctional facility or community under a grant.


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(b) Applicants for grants under this section must submit an application in the form and manner established by the commissioner.  The applicants must describe the arts program to be offered; how the program is supportive, therapeutic, and rehabilitative for incarcerated persons and persons on supervised release; and the use of the grant funds.

 

(c) Organizations are not required to apply for or receive grant funds under this section in order to be eligible to provide supportive arts programming inside the correctional facilities.

 

(d) By March 1 of each year, the commissioner shall report to the chairs and ranking members of the legislative committees and divisions having jurisdiction over criminal justice finance and policy on the implementation, use, and administration of the grant program established under this section.  At a minimum, the report must provide:

 

(1) the names of the organizations receiving grants;

 

(2) the total number of individuals served by all grant recipients, disaggregated by race, ethnicity, and gender;

 

(3) the names of the correctional facilities and communities where incarcerated persons and persons on supervised release are participating in supportive arts programs offered under this section;

 

(4) the total amount of money awarded in grants and the total amount remaining to be awarded, if any;

 

(5) the amount of money granted to each recipient;

 

(6) a description of the program, mission, goals, and objectives by the organization using the money; and

 

(7) a description of and measures of success, either qualitative or quantitative.

 

Sec. 18.  APPROPRIATIONS GIVEN EFFECT ONCE.

 

If an appropriation or transfer in this act is enacted more than once during the 2023 regular session, the appropriation or transfer must be given effect only once.

 

ARTICLE 3

JUDICIARY POLICY

 

Section 1.  [260C.419] STATEWIDE OFFICE OF APPELLATE COUNSEL AND TRAINING.

 

Subdivision 1.  Definitions.  (a) As used in this section, the following terms have the meanings given.

 

(b) "Board" means the State Board of Appellate Counsel and Training.

 

(c) "Juvenile protection matter" means any of the following:

 

(1) child in need of protection or services matters as defined in section 260C.007, subdivision 6, including habitual truant and runaway matters;

 

(2) neglected and in foster care matters as defined in section 260C.007, subdivision 24;

 

(3) review of voluntary foster care matters as defined in section 260C.141, subdivision 2;

 

(4) review of out-of-home placement matters as defined in section 260C.212;


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(5) termination of parental rights matters as defined in sections 260C.301 to 260C.328; and

 

(6) permanent placement matters as defined in sections 260C.503 to 260C.521, including matters involving termination of parental rights, guardianship to the commissioner of human services, transfer of permanent legal and physical custody to a relative, permanent custody to the agency, temporary legal custody to the agency, and matters involving voluntary placement pursuant to section 260D.07.

 

(d) "Office" means the Statewide Office of Appellate Counsel and Training.

 

Subd. 2.  Statewide Office of Appellate Counsel and Training; establishment.  (a) The Statewide Office of Appellate Counsel and Training is established as an independent state office.  The office shall be responsible for:

 

(1) establishing and maintaining a system for providing appellate representation to parents in juvenile protection matters, as provided in section 260C.163, subdivision 3, paragraph (c), and in Tribal court jurisdictions;

 

(2) providing training to all parent attorneys practicing in the state on topics relevant to their practice and establishing practice standards and training requirements for parent attorneys practicing in the state; and

 

(3) collaborating with the Minnesota Department of Human Services to coordinate and secure federal Title IV-E support for counties and Tribes interested in accessing federal funding.

 

(b) The office shall be governed by a board as provided in subdivision 3.

 

Subd. 3.  State Board of Appellate Counsel and Training; structure; membership.  (a) The State Board of Appellate Counsel and Training is established to direct the Statewide Office of Appellate Counsel and Training.  The board shall consist of seven members, including:

 

(1) four public members appointed by the governor; and

 

(2) three members appointed by the supreme court, at least one of whom must have experience representing parents in juvenile court and who include two attorneys admitted to practice law in the state and one public member.

 

(b) The appointing authorities may not appoint any of the following to be a member of the board:

 

(1) a person who is a judge;

 

(2) a person who is a registered lobbyist;

 

(3) a person serving as a guardian ad litem or counsel for a guardian ad litem;

 

(4) a person who serves as counsel for children in juvenile court;

 

(5) a person under contract with or employed by the Department of Human Services or a county department of human or social services; or

 

(6) a current city or county attorney or assistant city or county attorney.

 

(c) All members shall demonstrate an interest in maintaining a high quality, independent appellate defense system for parents in juvenile protection proceedings who are unable to obtain adequate representation, a robust program for parent attorneys in Minnesota, and an efficient coordination effort, in collaboration with the Department of Human Services, to secure and utilize Title IV-E funding.  At least one member of the board appointed by the


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governor must be a representative from a federally recognized Indian Tribe.  No more than five members of the board may belong to the same political party.  At least three members of the board shall be from judicial districts other than the First, Second, Fourth, and Tenth Judicial Districts.  To the extent practicable, the membership of the board must include persons with disabilities, reflect the ethnic diversity of the state, take into consideration race and gender, and include persons from throughout the state.  The members shall be well acquainted with representing parents in district court and appellate proceedings related to child protection matters as well as the law that affect a parent attorney's work, including chapter 260C, the Rules of Juvenile Protection Procedure, the Rules of Civil Appellate Procedure, the Indian Child Welfare Act, and the Minnesota Indian Family Preservation Act.  The terms, compensation, and removal of members shall be as provided in section 15.0575.  The members shall elect a chair from among the membership and the chair shall serve a term of two years.

 

Subd. 4.  Head appellate counsel for parents; assistant and contracted attorneys; other employees.  (a) Beginning January 1, 2024, and for every four years after that date, the board shall appoint a head appellate counsel in charge of executing the responsibilities of the office who shall provide for sufficient appellate counsel for parents and other personnel necessary to discharge the functions of the office.  The head appellate counsel shall serve a four‑year term and may be removed only for cause upon the order of the board.  The head appellate counsel shall be a full-time qualified attorney, licensed to practice law in this state, and serve in the unclassified service of the state.  Vacancies of the office shall be filled by the appointing authority for the unexpired term.  The head appellate counsel shall devote full time to the performance of duties and shall not engage in the general practice of law.  The compensation of the head appellate counsel shall be set by the board and shall be commensurate with county attorneys in the state.

 

(b) Consistent with the decisions of the board, the head appellate counsel shall employ assistants or hire independent contractors to serve as appellate counsel for parents.  Each assistant appellate counsel and independent contractor serves at the pleasure of the head appellate counsel.  The compensation of assistant appellate counsel and independent contractors shall be set by the board and shall be commensurate with county attorneys in the state.

 

(c) A person serving as appellate counsel shall be a qualified attorney licensed to practice law in this state.  A person serving as appellate counsel practicing in Tribal court shall be a licensed attorney qualified to practice law in Tribal courts in the state.  Assistant appellate counsel and contracted appellate counsel may engage in the general practice of law where not employed or contracted to provide services on a full-time basis.

 

(d) The head appellate counsel shall, consistent with the responsibilities under subdivision 2, employ or hire the following:

 

(1) one managing appellate attorney;

 

(2) two staff attorneys;

 

(3) one director of training;

 

(4) one program administrator to support Title IV-E reimbursement in collaboration with the Department of Human Services; and

 

(5) one office administrator.

 

(e) Each employee identified in paragraph (d) serves at the pleasure of the head appellate counsel.  The compensation of each employee shall be set by the board and shall be commensurate with county attorneys in the state.


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(f) Any person serving as managing appellate attorney, staff attorney, and director of training shall be a qualified attorney licensed to practice law in the state.

 

(g) A person serving as the program administrator and office administrator must be chosen solely on the basis of training, experience, and qualifications.

 

Subd. 5.  Duties and responsibilities.  (a) The board shall work cooperatively with the head appellate counsel to govern the office and provide fiscal oversight.

 

(b) The board shall approve and recommend to the legislature a budget for the board, the office, and any programs operated by that office.

 

(c) The board shall establish procedures for distribution of funding under this section to the office and any programs operated by that office.

 

(d) The head appellate counsel with the approval of the board shall establish appellate program standards, administrative policies, procedures, and rules consistent with statute, rules of court, and laws that affect appellate counsel's work.  The standards must include but are not limited to:

 

(1) standards needed to maintain and operate an appellate counsel for parents program, including requirements regarding the qualifications, training, and size of the legal and supporting staff for an appellate counsel program;

 

(2) standards for appellate counsel caseloads;

 

(3) standards and procedures for the eligibility of appointment, assessment, and collection of the costs for legal representation provided by appellate counsel;

 

(4) standards for contracts between contracted appellate counsel and the state appellate counsel program for the legal representation of indigent persons;

 

(5) standards prescribing minimum qualifications of counsel appointed under the board's authority or by the courts; and

 

(6) standards ensuring the independent, competent, and efficient representation of clients whose cases present conflicts of interest.

 

(e) The head appellate counsel, with approval of the board, shall establish training program standards and processes and procedures necessary to carry out the office's responsibilities for statewide training of parent attorneys, including but not limited to establishing uniform practice standards and training requirements for all parent attorneys practicing in the state.

 

(f) The head appellate counsel and the program administrator with approval of the board shall establish processes and procedures for collaborating with the Department of Human Services to secure and utilize Title IV-E funds and communicating with counties and Tribes and any other processes and procedures necessary to carry out the office's responsibilities.

 

(g) The board may:

 

(1) propose statutory changes to the legislature and rule changes to the supreme court that are in the best interests of the operation of the appellate counsel for parents program; and

 

(2) require the reporting of statistical data, budget information, and other cost factors by the appellate counsel for parents program.


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Subd. 6.  Limitation.  In no event shall the board or its members interfere with the discretion, judgment, or zealous advocacy of counsel in their handling of individual cases as a part of the judicial branch of government.

 

Subd. 7.  Budget; county and Tribe use.  The establishment of the office and its employees and support staff and the board shall be funded by the state of Minnesota.  Minnesota counties and Tribes may utilize this office to provide appellate representation to indigent parents in their jurisdiction who are seeking an appeal and for assistance in securing Title IV-E funding through collaboration with the Department of Human Services.

 

Subd. 8.  Collection of costs; appropriation.  If any of the costs provided by appellate counsel are assessed and collected or otherwise reimbursed from any source, the State Board of Appellate Counsel and Training shall deposit payments in a separate account established in the special revenue fund.  The amount credited to this account is appropriated to the State Board of Appellate Counsel and Training.  The balance of this account does not cancel but is available until expended.

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 357.021, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Fee amounts.  The fees to be charged and collected by the court administrator shall be as follows:

 

(1) In every civil action or proceeding in said court, including any case arising under the tax laws of the state that could be transferred or appealed to the Tax Court, the plaintiff, petitioner, or other moving party shall pay, when the first paper is filed for that party in said action, a fee of $285, except in marriage dissolution actions the fee is $315.

 

The defendant or other adverse or intervening party, or any one or more of several defendants or other adverse or intervening parties appearing separately from the others, shall pay, when the first paper is filed for that party in said action, a fee of $285, except in marriage dissolution actions the fee is $315.  This subdivision does not apply to the filing of an Application for Discharge of Judgment.  Section 548.181 applies to an Application for Discharge of Judgment.

 

The party requesting a trial by jury shall pay $100.

 

The fees above stated shall be the full trial fee chargeable to said parties irrespective of whether trial be to the court alone, to the court and jury, or disposed of without trial, and shall include the entry of judgment in the action, but does not include copies or certified copies of any papers so filed or proceedings under chapter 103E, except the provisions therein as to appeals.

 

(2) Certified copy of any instrument from a civil or criminal proceeding, $14, and $8 for an uncertified copy.

 

(3) Issuing a subpoena, $16 for each name.

 

(4) Filing a motion or response to a motion in civil, family, excluding child support, and guardianship cases, $75.

 

(5) Issuing an execution and filing the return thereof; issuing a writ of attachment, injunction, habeas corpus, mandamus, quo warranto, certiorari, or other writs not specifically mentioned, $55.

 

(6) Issuing a transcript of judgment, or for filing and docketing a transcript of judgment from another court, $40.

 

(7) Filing and entering a satisfaction of judgment, partial satisfaction, or assignment of judgment, $5.

 

(8) Certificate as to existence or nonexistence of judgments docketed, $5 for each name certified to.


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(9) Filing and indexing trade name; or recording basic science certificate; or recording certificate of physicians, osteopathic physicians, chiropractors, veterinarians, or optometrists, $5.

 

(10) For the filing of each partial, final, or annual account in all trusteeships, $55.

 

(11) For the deposit of a will, $27.

 

(12) For recording notary commission, $20.

 

(13) Filing a motion or response to a motion for modification of child support, a fee of $50.

 

(14) All other services required by law for which no fee is provided, such fee as compares favorably with those herein provided, or such as may be fixed by rule or order of the court.

 

(15) In addition to any other filing fees under this chapter, a surcharge in the amount of $75 must be assessed in accordance with section 259.52, subdivision 14, for each adoption petition filed in district court to fund the fathers' adoption registry under section 259.52.

 

The fees in clauses (3) and (5) need not be paid by a public authority or the party the public authority represents.  No fee may be charged to view or download a publicly available instrument from a civil or criminal proceeding or for an uncertified copy of that instrument.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 363A.06, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Formulation of policies.  (a) The commissioner shall formulate policies to effectuate the purposes of this chapter and shall do the following:

 

(1) exercise leadership under the direction of the governor in the development of human rights policies and programs, and make recommendations to the governor and the legislature for their consideration and implementation;

 

(2) establish and maintain a principal office in St. Paul, and any other necessary branch offices at any location within the state;

 

(3) meet and function at any place within the state;

 

(4) employ attorneys, clerks, and other employees and agents as the commissioner may deem necessary and prescribe their duties;

 

(5) to the extent permitted by federal law and regulation, utilize the records of the Department of Employment and Economic Development of the state when necessary to effectuate the purposes of this chapter;

 

(6) obtain upon request and utilize the services of all state governmental departments and agencies;

 

(7) adopt suitable rules for effectuating the purposes of this chapter;

 

(8) issue complaints, receive and investigate charges alleging unfair discriminatory practices, and determine whether or not probable cause exists for hearing;


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(9) subpoena witnesses, administer oaths, take testimony, and require the production for examination of any books or papers relative to any matter under investigation or in question as the commissioner deems appropriate to carry out the purposes of this chapter;

 

(10) attempt, by means of education, conference, conciliation, and persuasion to eliminate unfair discriminatory practices as being contrary to the public policy of the state;

 

(11) develop and conduct programs of formal and informal education designed to eliminate discrimination and intergroup conflict by use of educational techniques and programs the commissioner deems necessary;

 

(12) make a written report of the activities of the commissioner to the governor each year;

 

(13) accept gifts, bequests, grants, or other payments public and private to help finance the activities of the department;

 

(14) create such local and statewide advisory committees as will in the commissioner's judgment aid in effectuating the purposes of the Department of Human Rights;

 

(15) develop such programs as will aid in determining the compliance throughout the state with the provisions of this chapter, and in the furtherance of such duties, conduct research and study discriminatory practices based upon race, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex, age, disability, marital status, status with regard to public assistance, familial status, sexual orientation, or other factors and develop accurate data on the nature and extent of discrimination and other matters as they may affect housing, employment, public accommodations, schools, and other areas of public life;

 

(16) develop and disseminate technical assistance to persons subject to the provisions of this chapter, and to agencies and officers of governmental and private agencies;

 

(17) provide staff services to such advisory committees as may be created in aid of the functions of the Department of Human Rights;

 

(18) make grants in aid to the extent that appropriations are made available for that purpose in aid of carrying out duties and responsibilities; and

 

(19) cooperate and consult with the commissioner of labor and industry regarding the investigation of violations of, and resolution of complaints regarding section 363A.08, subdivision 7.; and

 

(20) analyze civil rights trends pursuant to this chapter, including information compiled from community organizations that work directly with historically marginalized communities, and prepare a report each biennium that recommends policy and system changes to reduce and prevent further civil rights incidents across Minnesota.  The report shall be provided to the chairs and ranking minority members of the house of representatives and senate committees with jurisdiction over the Department of Human Rights.  This report must also be posted on the Department of Human Rights' public website and shared with community organizations that work with historically marginalized communities.

 

In performing these duties, the commissioner shall give priority to those duties in clauses (8), (9), and (10) and to the duties in section 363A.36.

 

(b) All gifts, bequests, grants, or other payments, public and private, accepted under paragraph (a), clause (13), must be deposited in the state treasury and credited to a special account.  Money in the account is appropriated to the commissioner of human rights to help finance activities of the department.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective July 1, 2023, and the commissioner must provide the first report by February 1, 2025.


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Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 484.85, is amended to read:

 

484.85 DISPOSITION OF FINES, FEES, AND OTHER MONEY; ACCOUNTS; RAMSEY COUNTY DISTRICT COURT.

 

(a) In all cases prosecuted in Ramsey County District Court by an attorney for a municipality or subdivision of government within Ramsey County for violation of a statute; an ordinance; or a charter provision, rule, or regulation of a city; all fines, penalties, and forfeitures collected by the court administrator shall be deposited in the state treasury and distributed according to this paragraph.  Except where a different disposition is provided by section 299D.03, subdivision 5, or other law, on or before the last day of each month, the court shall pay over all fines, penalties, and forfeitures collected by the court administrator during the previous month as follows:

 

(1) for offenses committed within the city of St. Paul, two-thirds paid to the treasurer of the city of St. Paul municipality or subdivision of government within Ramsey County and one-third credited to the state general fund; and.

 

(2) for offenses committed within any other municipality or subdivision of government within Ramsey County, one-half paid to the treasurer of the municipality or subdivision of government and one-half credited to the state general fund.

 

All other fines, penalties, and forfeitures collected by the district court shall be distributed by the courts as provided by law.

 

(b) Fines, penalties, and forfeitures shall be distributed as provided in paragraph (a) when:

 

(1) a city contracts with the county attorney for prosecutorial services under section 484.87, subdivision 3; or

 

(2) the attorney general provides assistance to the city attorney under section 484.87, subdivision 5.

 

Sec. 5.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 611.23, is amended to read:

 

611.23 OFFICE OF STATE PUBLIC DEFENDER; APPOINTMENT; SALARY.

 

The state public defender is responsible to the State Board of Public Defense.  The state public defender shall supervise the operation, activities, policies, and procedures of the statewide public defender system.  When requested by a district public defender or appointed counsel, the state public defender may assist the district public defender, appointed counsel, or an organization designated in section 611.216 in the performance of duties, including trial representation in matters involving legal conflicts of interest or other special circumstances, and assistance with legal research and brief preparation.  The state public defender shall be appointed by the State Board of Public Defense for a term of four years, except as otherwise provided in this section, and until a successor is appointed and qualified.  The state public defender shall be a full-time qualified attorney, licensed to practice law in this state, serve in the unclassified service of the state, and be removed only for cause by the appointing authority.  Vacancies in the office shall be filled by the appointing authority for the unexpired term.  The salary of the state public defender shall be fixed by the State Board of Public Defense but must not exceed the salary of a district court judge.  Terms of the state public defender shall commence on July 1.  The state public defender shall devote full time to the performance of duties and shall not engage in the general practice of law.


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ARTICLE 4

GENERAL CRIMES

 

Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 243.166, subdivision 1b, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 1b.  Registration required.  (a) A person shall register under this section if:

 

(1) the person was charged with or petitioned for a felony violation of or attempt to violate, or aiding, abetting, or conspiracy to commit, any of the following, and convicted of or adjudicated delinquent for that offense or another offense arising out of the same set of circumstances:

 

(i) murder under section 609.185, paragraph (a), clause (2);

 

(ii) kidnapping under section 609.25;

 

(iii) criminal sexual conduct under section 609.342; 609.343; 609.344; 609.345; 609.3451, subdivision 3, paragraph (b); or 609.3453;

 

(iv) indecent exposure under section 617.23, subdivision 3; or

 

(v) surreptitious intrusion under the circumstances described in section 609.746, subdivision 1, paragraph (f) (h);

 

(2) the person was charged with or petitioned for a violation of, or attempt to violate, or aiding, abetting, or conspiring to commit any of the following and convicted of or adjudicated delinquent for that offense or another offense arising out of the same set of circumstances:

 

(i) criminal abuse in violation of section 609.2325, subdivision 1, paragraph (b);

 

(ii) false imprisonment in violation of section 609.255, subdivision 2;

 

(iii) solicitation, inducement, or promotion of the prostitution of a minor or engaging in the sex trafficking of a minor in violation of section 609.322;

 

(iv) a prostitution offense in violation of section 609.324, subdivision 1, paragraph (a);

 

(v) soliciting a minor to engage in sexual conduct in violation of section 609.352, subdivision 2 or 2a, clause (1);

 

(vi) using a minor in a sexual performance in violation of section 617.246; or

 

(vii) possessing pornographic work involving a minor in violation of section 617.247;

 

(3) the person was sentenced as a patterned sex offender under section 609.3455, subdivision 3a; or

 

(4) the person was charged with or petitioned for, including pursuant to a court martial, violating a law of the United States, including the Uniform Code of Military Justice, similar to an offense or involving similar circumstances to an offense described in clause (1), (2), or (3), and convicted of or adjudicated delinquent for that offense or another offense arising out of the same set of circumstances.


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(b) A person also shall register under this section if:

 

(1) the person was charged with or petitioned for an offense in another state similar to an offense or involving similar circumstances to an offense described in paragraph (a), clause (1), (2), or (3), and convicted of or adjudicated delinquent for that offense or another offense arising out of the same set of circumstances;

 

(2) the person enters this state to reside, work, or attend school, or enters this state and remains for 14 days or longer or for an aggregate period of time exceeding 30 days during any calendar year; and

 

(3) ten years have not elapsed since the person was released from confinement or, if the person was not confined, since the person was convicted of or adjudicated delinquent for the offense that triggers registration, unless the person is subject to a longer registration period under the laws of another state in which the person has been convicted or adjudicated, or is subject to lifetime registration.

 

If a person described in this paragraph is subject to a longer registration period in another state or is subject to lifetime registration, the person shall register for that time period regardless of when the person was released from confinement, convicted, or adjudicated delinquent.

 

(c) A person also shall register under this section if the person was committed pursuant to a court commitment order under Minnesota Statutes 2012, section 253B.185, chapter 253D, Minnesota Statutes 1992, section 526.10, or a similar law of another state or the United States, regardless of whether the person was convicted of any offense.

 

(d) A person also shall register under this section if:

 

(1) the person was charged with or petitioned for a felony violation or attempt to violate any of the offenses listed in paragraph (a), clause (1), or a similar law of another state or the United States, or the person was charged with or petitioned for a violation of any of the offenses listed in paragraph (a), clause (2), or a similar law of another state or the United States;

 

(2) the person was found not guilty by reason of mental illness or mental deficiency after a trial for that offense, or found guilty but mentally ill after a trial for that offense, in states with a guilty but mentally ill verdict; and

 

(3) the person was committed pursuant to a court commitment order under section 253B.18 or a similar law of another state or the United States.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2023.

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 609.02, subdivision 16, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 16.  Qualified domestic violence-related offense.  "Qualified domestic violence-related offense" includes a violation of or an attempt to violate sections 518B.01, subdivision 14 (violation of domestic abuse order for protection); 609.185 (first-degree murder); 609.19 (second-degree murder); 609.195, paragraph (a) (third-degree murder); 609.20, clauses (1), (2), and (5) (first-degree manslaughter); 609.205, clauses (1) and (5) (second-degree manslaughter); 609.221 (first-degree assault); 609.222 (second-degree assault); 609.223 (third-degree assault); 609.2231 (fourth-degree assault); 609.224 (fifth-degree assault); 609.2242 (domestic assault); 609.2245 (female genital mutilation); 609.2247 (domestic assault by strangulation); 609.25 (kidnapping); 609.255 (false imprisonment); 609.342 (first-degree criminal sexual conduct); 609.343 (second-degree criminal sexual conduct); 609.344 (third-degree criminal sexual conduct); 609.345 (fourth-degree criminal sexual conduct); 609.3458 (sexual extortion); 609.377 (malicious punishment of a child); 609.582, subdivision 1, clause (c) (burglary in the first degree); 609.713 (terroristic threats); 609.748, subdivision 6 (violation of harassment restraining order); 609.749 (harassment or stalking); 609.78, subdivision 2 (interference with an emergency call); 617.261 (nonconsensual dissemination of private sexual images); and 629.75 (violation of domestic abuse no contact order); and similar laws of other states, the United States, the District of Columbia, tribal lands, and United States territories.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2023.


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Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 609.05, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 2a.  Exception.  (a) A person may not be held criminally liable for a violation of section 609.185, paragraph (a), clause (3), for a death caused by another unless the person intentionally aided, advised, hired, counseled, or conspired with or otherwise procured the other with the intent to cause the death of a human being.

 

(b) A person may not be held criminally liable for a violation of section 609.19, subdivision 2, clause (1), for a death caused by another unless the person was a major participant in the underlying felony and acted with extreme indifference to human life.

 

(c) As used in this subdivision, "major participant" means a person who:

 

(1) used a deadly weapon during the commission of the underlying felony or provided a deadly weapon to another participant where it was reasonably foreseeable that the weapon would be used in the underlying felony;

 

(2) caused substantial bodily harm to another during the commission of the underlying felony;

 

(3) coerced or hired a participant to undertake actions in furtherance of the underlying felony that proximately caused the death, and where it was reasonably foreseeable that such actions would cause death or great bodily harm; or

 

(4) impeded another person from preventing the death either by physical action or by threat of physical action where it was reasonably foreseeable that death or great bodily harm would result.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2023, and applies to crimes committed on or after that date.  The section does not apply to crimes committed before August 1, 2023.

 

Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 609.2231, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Assaults motivated by bias.  (a) Whoever assaults another in whole or in substantial part because of the victim's or another's actual or perceived race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, age, national origin, or disability as defined in section 363A.03, age, or national origin or because of the victim's actual or perceived association with another person or group of a certain actual or perceived race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, age, national origin, or disability as defined in section 363A.03, may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than one year or to payment of a fine of not more than $3,000, or both.

 

(b) Whoever violates the provisions of paragraph (a) within five years of a previous conviction under paragraph (a) is guilty of a felony and may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than one year and a day or to payment of a fine of not more than $3,000, or both.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2023, and applies to crimes committed on or after that date.

 

Sec. 5.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 609.2233, is amended to read:

 

609.2233 FELONY ASSAULT MOTIVATED BY BIAS; INCREASED STATUTORY MAXIMUM SENTENCE.

 

A person who violates section 609.221, 609.222, or 609.223 in whole or in substantial part because of the victim's or another person's actual or perceived race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, age, national origin, or disability as defined in section 363A.03, age, or national origin or because of the victim's actual or perceived association with another person or group of a certain actual or


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perceived race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, age, national origin, or disability as defined in section 363A.03, is subject to a statutory maximum penalty of 25 percent longer than the maximum penalty otherwise applicable.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2023, and applies to crimes committed on or after that date.

 

Sec. 6.  [609.247] CARJACKING.

 

Subdivision 1.  Definitions.  (a) As used in this section, the following terms have the meanings given.

 

(b) "Carjacking" means taking a motor vehicle from the person or in the presence of another while having knowledge of not being entitled to the motor vehicle and using or threatening the imminent use of force against any person to overcome the person's resistance or powers of resistance to, or to compel acquiescence in, the taking of the motor vehicle.

 

(c) "Motor vehicle" has the meaning given in section 609.52, subdivision 1, clause (10).

 

Subd. 2.  First degree.  Whoever, while committing a carjacking, is armed with a dangerous weapon or any article used or fashioned in a manner to lead the victim to reasonably believe it to be a dangerous weapon, or inflicts bodily harm upon another, is guilty of carjacking in the first degree and may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than 20 years or to payment of a fine of not more than $35,000, or both.

 

Subd. 3.  Second degree.  Whoever, while committing a carjacking, implies, by word or act, possession of a dangerous weapon, is guilty of carjacking in the second degree and may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than 15 years or to payment of a fine of not more than $30,000, or both.

 

Subd. 4.  Third degree.  Whoever commits carjacking under any other circumstances is guilty of carjacking in the third degree and may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than ten years or to payment of a fine of not more than $20,000, or both.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2023, and applies to crimes committed on or after that date.

 

Sec. 7.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 609.25, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Sentence.  Whoever violates subdivision 1 may be sentenced as follows:

 

(1) if the victim is released in a safe place without great bodily harm, to imprisonment for not more than 20 years or to payment of a fine of not more than $35,000, or both; or

 

(2) if the victim is not released in a safe place, or if the victim suffers great bodily harm during the course of the kidnapping, or if the person kidnapped is under the age of 16, to imprisonment for not more than 40 years or to payment of a fine of not more than $50,000, or both if:

 

(i) the victim is not released in a safe place;

 

(ii) the victim suffers great bodily harm during the course of the kidnapping; or

 

(iii) the person kidnapped is under the age of 16.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2023.


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Sec. 8.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 609.269, is amended to read:

 

609.269 EXCEPTION.

 

Sections 609.2661 to 609.268 do not apply to any act described in section 145.412. a person providing reproductive health care offered, arranged, or furnished:

 

(1) for the purpose of terminating a pregnancy; and

 

(2) with the consent of the pregnant individual or the pregnant individual's representative, except in a medical emergency in which consent cannot be obtained.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 9.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 609.52, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Sentence.  Whoever commits theft may be sentenced as follows:

 

(1) to imprisonment for not more than 20 years or to payment of a fine of not more than $100,000, or both, if the property is a firearm, or the value of the property or services stolen is more than $35,000 and the conviction is for a violation of subdivision 2, clause (3), (4), (15), (16), or (19), or section 609.2335, subdivision 1, clause (1) or (2), item (i); or

 

(2) to imprisonment for not more than ten years or to payment of a fine of not more than $20,000, or both, if the value of the property or services stolen exceeds $5,000, or if the property stolen was an article representing a trade secret, an explosive or incendiary device, or a controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II pursuant to section 152.02 with the exception of marijuana; or

 

(3) to imprisonment for not more than five years or to payment of a fine of not more than $10,000, or both, if any of the following circumstances exist:

 

(a) the value of the property or services stolen is more than $1,000 but not more than $5,000; or

 

(b) the property stolen was a controlled substance listed in Schedule III, IV, or V pursuant to section 152.02; or

 

(c) the value of the property or services stolen is more than $500 but not more than $1,000 and the person has been convicted within the preceding five years for an offense under this section, section 256.98; 268.182; 609.24; 609.245; 609.522; 609.53; 609.582, subdivision 1, 2, or 3; 609.625; 609.63; 609.631; or 609.821, or a statute from another state, the United States, or a foreign jurisdiction, in conformity with any of those sections, and the person received a felony or gross misdemeanor sentence for the offense, or a sentence that was stayed under section 609.135 if the offense to which a plea was entered would allow imposition of a felony or gross misdemeanor sentence; or

 

(d) the value of the property or services stolen is not more than $1,000, and any of the following circumstances exist:

 

(i) the property is taken from the person of another or from a corpse, or grave or coffin containing a corpse; or

 

(ii) the property is a record of a court or officer, or a writing, instrument or record kept, filed or deposited according to law with or in the keeping of any public officer or office; or


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(iii) the property is taken from a burning, abandoned, or vacant building or upon its removal therefrom, or from an area of destruction caused by civil disaster, riot, bombing, or the proximity of battle; or

 

(iv) the property consists of public funds belonging to the state or to any political subdivision or agency thereof; or

 

(v) the property stolen is a motor vehicle; or

 

(4) to imprisonment for not more than one year or to payment of a fine of not more than $3,000, or both, if the value of the property or services stolen is more than $500 but not more than $1,000; or

 

(5) in all other cases where the value of the property or services stolen is $500 or less, to imprisonment for not more than 90 days or to payment of a fine of not more than $1,000, or both, provided, however, in any prosecution under subdivision 2, clauses (1), (2), (3), (4), (13), and (19), the value of the money or property or services received by the defendant in violation of any one or more of the above provisions within any six-month period may be aggregated and the defendant charged accordingly in applying the provisions of this subdivision; provided that when two or more offenses are committed by the same person in two or more counties, the accused may be prosecuted in any county in which one of the offenses was committed for all of the offenses aggregated under this paragraph.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2023, and applies to crimes committed on or after that date.

 

Sec. 10.  [609.522] ORGANIZED RETAIL THEFT.

 

Subdivision 1.  Definitions.  (a) As used in this section, the following terms have the meanings given.

 

(b) "Pattern of retail theft" means acts committed or directed by the defendant on at least two separate occasions in the preceding six months that would constitute a violation of:

 

(1) section 609.52, subdivision 2, paragraph (a), clauses (1), (3), and (4), involving retail merchandise;

 

(2) section 609.521;

 

(3) section 609.53, subdivision 1, involving retail merchandise;

 

(4) section 609.582 when the building was a retail establishment; or

 

(5) section 609.59.

 

(c) "Retail establishment" means the building where a retailer sells retail merchandise.

 

(d) "Retail merchandise" means all forms of tangible property, without limitation, held out for sale by a retailer.

 

(e) "Retail theft enterprise" means a group of two or more individuals with a shared goal involving the unauthorized removal of retail merchandise from a retailer.  Retail theft enterprise does not require the membership of the enterprise to remain the same or that the same individuals participate in each offense committed by the enterprise.

 

(f) "Retailer" means a person or entity that sells retail merchandise.

 

(g) "Value" means the retail market value at the time of the theft or, if the retail market value cannot be ascertained, the cost of replacement of the property within a reasonable time after the theft.


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Subd. 2.  Organized retail theft.  A person is guilty of organized retail theft if:

 

(1) the person is employed by or associated with a retail theft enterprise;

 

(2) the person has previously engaged in a pattern of retail theft and intentionally commits an act or directs another member of the retail theft enterprise to commit an act involving retail merchandise that would constitute a violation of:

 

(i) section 609.52, subdivision 2, paragraph (a), clauses (1), (3), and (4); or

 

(ii) section 609.53, subdivision 1; and

 

(3) the person or another member of the retail theft enterprise:

 

(i) resells or intends to resell the stolen retail merchandise;

 

(ii) advertises or displays any item of the stolen retail merchandise for sale; or

 

(iii) returns any item of the stolen retail merchandise to a retailer for anything of value.

 

Subd. 3.  Sentence.  Whoever commits organized retail theft may be sentenced as follows:

 

(1) to imprisonment for not more than 15 years or to payment of a fine of not more than $35,000, or both, if the value of the property stolen exceeds $5,000;

 

(2) to imprisonment for not more than seven years or to payment of a fine of not more than $14,000, or both, if either of the following circumstances exist:

 

(i) the value of the property stolen is more than $1,000 but not more than $5,000; or

 

(ii) the value of the property is more than $500 but not more than $1,000 and the person commits the offense within ten years of the first of two or more convictions under this section, section 256.98; 268.182; 609.24; 609.245; 609.52; 609.53; 609.582, subdivision 1, 2, or 3; 609.625; 609.63; 609.631; or 609.821, or a statute from another state, the United States, or a foreign jurisdiction, in conformity with any of those sections, and the person received a felony or gross misdemeanor sentence for the offense, or a sentence that was stayed under section 609.135 if the offense to which a plea was entered would allow imposition of a felony or gross misdemeanor sentence;

 

(3) to imprisonment for not more than two years or to payment of a fine of not more than $5,000, or both, if either of the following circumstances exist:

 

(i) the value of the property stolen is more than $500 but not more than $1,000; or

 

(ii) the value of the property is $500 or less and the person commits the offense within ten years of a previous conviction under this section, section 256.98; 268.182; 609.24; 609.245; 609.52; 609.53; 609.582, subdivision 1, 2, or 3; 609.625; 609.63; 609.631; or 609.821, or a statute from another state, the United States, or a foreign jurisdiction, in conformity with any of those sections, and the person received a felony or gross misdemeanor sentence for the offense, or a sentence that was stayed under section 609.135 if the offense to which a plea was entered would allow imposition of a felony or gross misdemeanor sentence; or

 

(4) to imprisonment of not more than one year or to payment of a fine of not more than $3,000, or both, if the value of the property stolen is $500 or less.


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Subd. 4.  Aggregation.  The value of the retail merchandise received by the defendant in violation of this section within any six-month period may be aggregated and the defendant charged accordingly in applying the provisions of this subdivision; provided that when two or more offenses are committed by the same person in two or more counties, the accused may be prosecuted in any county in which one of the offenses was committed for all of the offenses aggregated under this subdivision.

 

Subd. 5.  Enhanced penalty.  If a violation of this section creates a reasonably foreseeable risk of bodily harm to another, the penalties described in subdivision 3 are enhanced as follows:

 

(1) if the penalty is a gross misdemeanor, the person is guilty of a felony and may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than three years or to payment of a fine of not more than $5,000, or both; and

 

(2) if the penalty is a felony, the statutory maximum sentence for the offense is 50 percent longer than for the underlying crime.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2023, and applies to crimes committed on or after that date.

 

Sec. 11.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 609.582, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Burglary in the third degree.  (a) Except as otherwise provided in this section, whoever enters a building without consent and with intent to steal or commit any felony or gross misdemeanor while in the building, or enters a building without consent and steals or commits a felony or gross misdemeanor while in the building, either directly or as an accomplice, commits burglary in the third degree and may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than five years or to payment of a fine of not more than $10,000, or both.

 

(b) Whoever enters a building that is open to the public, other than a building identified in subdivision 2, paragraph (b), with intent to steal while in the building, or enters a building that is open to the public, other than a building identified in subdivision 2, paragraph (b), and steals while in the building, either directly or as an accomplice, commits burglary in the third degree and may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than five years or to payment of a fine of not more than $10,000, or both, if:

 

(1) the person enters the building within one year after being told to leave the building and not return; and

 

(2) the person has been convicted within the preceding five years for an offense under this section, section 256.98, 268.182, 609.24, 609.245, 609.52, 609.522, 609.53, 609.625, 609.63, 609.631, or 609.821, or a statute from another state, the United States, or a foreign jurisdiction, in conformity with any of those sections, and the person received a felony sentence for the offense or a sentence that was stayed under section 609.135 if the offense to which a plea was entered would allow imposition of a felony sentence.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2023, and applies to crimes committed on or after that date.

 

Sec. 12.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 609.582, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Burglary in the fourth degree.  (a) Whoever enters a building without consent and with intent to commit a misdemeanor other than to steal, or enters a building without consent and commits a misdemeanor other than to steal while in the building, either directly or as an accomplice, commits burglary in the fourth degree and may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than one year or to payment of a fine of not more than $3,000, or both.

 

(b) Whoever enters a building that is open to the public, other than a building identified in subdivision 2, paragraph (b), with intent to steal while in the building, or enters a building that is open to the public, other than a building identified in subdivision 2, paragraph (b), and steals while in the building, either directly or as an


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accomplice, commits burglary in the fourth degree and may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than one year or to payment of a fine of not more than $3,000, or both, if the person enters the building within one year after being told to leave the building and not return.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2023, and applies to crimes committed on or after that date.

 

Sec. 13.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 609.595, subdivision 1a, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 1a.  Criminal damage to property in the second degree.  (a) Whoever intentionally causes damage described in subdivision 2, paragraph (a), because of the property owner's or another's actual or perceived race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, disability as defined in section 363A.03, age, or national origin is guilty of a felony and may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than one year and a day or to payment of a fine of not more than $3,000, or both., if the damage:

 

(1) was committed in whole or in substantial part because of the property owner's or another's actual or perceived race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, age, national origin, or disability as defined in section 363A.03;

 

(2) was committed in whole or in substantial part because of the victim's actual or perceived association with another person or group of a certain actual or perceived race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, age, national origin, or disability as defined in section 363A.03; or

 

(3) was motivated in whole or in substantial part by an intent to intimidate or harm an individual or group of individuals because of actual or perceived race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, age, national origin, or disability as defined in section 363A.03.

 

(b) In any prosecution under paragraph (a), the value of property damaged by the defendant in violation of that paragraph within any six-month period may be aggregated and the defendant charged accordingly in applying this section.  When two or more offenses are committed by the same person in two or more counties, the accused may be prosecuted in any county in which one of the offenses was committed for all of the offenses aggregated under this paragraph.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2023, and applies to crimes committed on or after that date.

 

Sec. 14.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 609.595, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Criminal damage to property in the third degree.  (a) Except as otherwise provided in subdivision 1a, whoever intentionally causes damage to another person's physical property without the other person's consent may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than one year or to payment of a fine of not more than $3,000, or both, if:  (1) the damage reduces the value of the property by more than $500 but not more than $1,000 as measured by the cost of repair and replacement; or (2) the damage was to a public safety motor vehicle and the defendant knew the vehicle was a public safety motor vehicle.

 

(b) Whoever intentionally causes damage to another person's physical property without the other person's consent because of the property owner's or another's actual or perceived race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, disability as defined in section 363A.03, age, or national origin may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than one year or to payment of a fine of not more than $3,000, or both, if the damage reduces the value of the property by not more than $500. and:


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(1) was committed in whole or in substantial part because of the property owner's or another's actual or perceived race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, age, national origin, or disability as defined in section 363A.03;

 

(2) was committed in whole or in substantial part because of the victim's actual or perceived association with another person or group of a certain actual or perceived race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, age, national origin, or disability as defined in section 363A.03; or

 

(3) was motivated in whole or in substantial part by an intent to intimidate or harm an individual or group of individuals because of actual or perceived race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, age, national origin, or disability as defined in section 363A.03.

 

(c) In any prosecution under paragraph (a), clause (1), the value of property damaged by the defendant in violation of that paragraph within any six-month period may be aggregated and the defendant charged accordingly in applying this section.  When two or more offenses are committed by the same person in two or more counties, the accused may be prosecuted in any county in which one of the offenses was committed for all of the offenses aggregated under this paragraph.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2023, and applies to crimes committed on or after that date.

 

Sec. 15.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 609.67, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Definitions.  (a) "Machine gun" means any firearm designed to discharge, or capable of discharging automatically more than once by a single function of the trigger.

 

(b) "Shotgun" means a weapon designed, redesigned, made or remade which is intended to be fired from the shoulder and uses the energy of the explosive in a fixed shotgun shell to fire through a smooth bore either a number of ball shot or a single projectile for each single pull of the trigger.

 

(c) "Short-barreled shotgun" means a shotgun having one or more barrels less than 18 inches in length and any weapon made from a shotgun if such weapon as modified has an overall length less than 26 inches.

 

(d) "Trigger activator" means:

 

(1) a removable manual or power driven trigger activating device constructed and designed so that, when attached to a firearm, the rate at which the trigger may be pulled increases and the rate of fire of the firearm increases to that of a machine gun; or

 

(2) a device that allows a semiautomatic firearm to shoot more than one shot with a single pull of the trigger or by harnessing the recoil of energy of the semiautomatic firearm to which it is affixed so that the trigger resets and continues firing without additional physical manipulation of the trigger.

 

(e) "Machine gun conversion kit" means any part or combination of parts designed and intended for use in converting a weapon into a machine gun, and any combination of parts from which a machine gun can be assembled, but does not include a spare or replacement part for a machine gun that is possessed lawfully under section 609.67, subdivision 3.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2023, and applies to offenses that occur on or after that date.


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Sec. 16.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 609.67, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Acts prohibited.  (a) Except as otherwise provided herein, whoever owns, possesses, or operates a machine gun, or any trigger activator or machine gun conversion kit, or a short-barreled shotgun may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than five 20 years or to payment of a fine of not more than $10,000 $35,000, or both.

 

(b) Except as otherwise provided herein, whoever owns, possesses, or operates a short-barreled shotgun may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than five years or to payment of a fine of not more than $10,000, or both.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2023, and applies to offenses that occur on or after that date.

 

Sec. 17.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 609.746, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Surreptitious intrusion; observation device.  (a) A person is guilty of a gross misdemeanor who:

 

(1) enters upon another's property;

 

(2) surreptitiously gazes, stares, or peeps in the window or any other aperture of a house or place of dwelling of another; and

 

(3) does so with intent to intrude upon or interfere with the privacy of a member of the household.

 

(b) A person is guilty of a gross misdemeanor who:

 

(1) enters upon another's property;

 

(2) surreptitiously installs or uses any device for observing, photographing, recording, amplifying, or broadcasting sounds or events through the window or any other aperture of a house or place of dwelling of another; and

 

(3) does so with intent to intrude upon or interfere with the privacy of a member of the household.

 

(c) A person is guilty of a gross misdemeanor who:

 

(1) surreptitiously gazes, stares, or peeps in the window or other aperture of a sleeping room in a hotel, as defined in section 327.70, subdivision 3, a tanning booth, or other place where a reasonable person would have an expectation of privacy and has exposed or is likely to expose their intimate parts, as defined in section 609.341, subdivision 5, or the clothing covering the immediate area of the intimate parts; and

 

(2) does so with intent to intrude upon or interfere with the privacy of the occupant.

 

(d) A person is guilty of a gross misdemeanor who:

 

(1) surreptitiously installs or uses any device for observing, photographing, recording, amplifying, or broadcasting sounds or events through the window or other aperture of a sleeping room in a hotel, as defined in section 327.70, subdivision 3, a tanning booth, or other place where a reasonable person would have an expectation of privacy and has exposed or is likely to expose their intimate parts, as defined in section 609.341, subdivision 5, or the clothing covering the immediate area of the intimate parts; and

 

(2) does so with intent to intrude upon or interfere with the privacy of the occupant.


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(e) A person is guilty of a gross misdemeanor who:

 

(1) uses any device for photographing, recording, or broadcasting an image of an individual in a house or place of dwelling; a sleeping room of a hotel as defined in section 327.70, subdivision 3; a tanning booth; a bathroom; a locker room; a changing room; an indoor shower facility; or any place where a reasonable person would have an expectation of privacy; and

 

(2) does so with the intent to photograph, record, or broadcast an image of the individual's intimate parts, as defined in section 609.341, subdivision 5, without the consent of the individual.

 

(f) A person is guilty of a misdemeanor who:

 

(1) surreptitiously installs or uses any device for observing, photographing, recording, or broadcasting an image of an individual's intimate parts, as defined in section 609.341, subdivision 5, or the clothing covering the immediate area of the intimate parts;

 

(2) observes, photographs, or records the image under or around the individual's clothing; and

 

(3) does so with intent to intrude upon or interfere with the privacy of the individual.

 

(e) (g) A person is guilty of a felony and may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than two years or to payment of a fine of not more than $5,000, or both, if the person:

 

(1) violates this subdivision paragraph (a), (b), (c), (d), or (e) after a previous conviction under this subdivision or section 609.749; or

 

(2) violates this subdivision paragraph (a), (b), (c), (d), or (e) against a minor under the age of 18, knowing or having reason to know that the minor is present.

 

(f) (h) A person is guilty of a felony and may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than four years or to payment of a fine of not more than $5,000, or both, if:  (1) the person violates paragraph (b) or, (d), or (e) against a minor victim under the age of 18; (2) the person is more than 36 months older than the minor victim; (3) the person knows or has reason to know that the minor victim is present; and (4) the violation is committed with sexual intent.

 

(i) A person is guilty of a gross misdemeanor if the person:

 

(1) violates paragraph (f) after a previous conviction under this subdivision or section 609.749; or

 

(2) violates paragraph (f) against a minor under the age of 18, knowing or having reason to know that the victim is a minor.

 

(j) A person is guilty of a felony if the person violates paragraph (f) after two or more convictions under this subdivision or section 609.749.

 

(g) Paragraphs (k) Paragraph (b) and, (d) do, or (e) does not apply to law enforcement officers or corrections investigators, or to those acting under their direction, while engaged in the performance of their lawful duties.  Paragraphs (c) and, (d), and (e) do not apply to conduct in:  (1) a medical facility; or (2) a commercial establishment if the owner of the establishment has posted conspicuous signs warning that the premises are under surveillance by the owner or the owner's employees.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2023, and applies to crimes committed on or after that date.


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Sec. 18.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 609.749, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Aggravated violations.  (a) A person who commits any of the following acts is guilty of a felony and may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than five years or to payment of a fine of not more than $10,000, or both:

 

(1) commits any offense described in subdivision 2 in whole or in substantial part because of the victim's or another's actual or perceived race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, age, national origin, or disability as defined in section 363A.03, age, or national origin or because of the victim's actual or perceived association with another person or group of a certain actual or perceived race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, age, national origin, or disability as defined in section 363A.03;

 

(2) commits any offense described in subdivision 2 by falsely impersonating another;

 

(3) commits any offense described in subdivision 2 and a dangerous weapon was used in any way in the commission of the offense;

 

(4) commits any offense described in subdivision 2 with intent to influence or otherwise tamper with a juror or a judicial proceeding or with intent to retaliate against a judicial officer, as defined in section 609.415, or a prosecutor, defense attorney, or officer of the court, because of that person's performance of official duties in connection with a judicial proceeding; or

 

(5) commits any offense described in subdivision 2 against a victim under the age of 18, if the actor is more than 36 months older than the victim.

 

(b) A person who commits any offense described in subdivision 2 against a victim under the age of 18, if the actor is more than 36 months older than the victim, and the act is committed with sexual or aggressive intent, is guilty of a felony and may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than ten years or to payment of a fine of not more than $20,000, or both.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2023, and applies to crimes committed on or after that date.

 

Sec. 19.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 609.78, subdivision 2a, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2a.  Felony offense; reporting fictitious emergency resulting in serious injury.  Whoever violates subdivision 2, clause (2), is guilty of a felony and may be sentenced as follows:

 

(1) to imprisonment for not more than ten years or to payment of a fine of not more than $20,000, or both, if the call triggers an emergency response and, as a result of the response, someone suffers great bodily harm or death.; or

 

(2) to imprisonment of not more than three years or to payment of a fine of not more than $10,000, or both, if the call triggers an emergency response and as a result of the response, someone suffers substantial bodily harm.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2023, and applies to crimes committed on or after that date.

 

Sec. 20.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 617.22, is amended to read:

 

617.22 CONCEALING BIRTH.

 

Every Any person who shall endeavor attempts to conceal the birth of a child by any disposition of its dead body, whether when the child died before or after its birth, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.  Every person who, having been convicted of endeavoring to conceal the stillbirth of any issue, or the death of any issue under the age of


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two years, shall, subsequent to that conviction, endeavor to conceal any subsequent birth or death, shall be punished by imprisonment for not more than five years.  This section does not apply to the disposition of remains resulting from an abortion or miscarriage.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 21.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 617.26, is amended to read:

 

617.26 MAILING AND CARRYING OBSCENE MATTER.

 

Every person who shall deposit or cause to be deposited in any post office in the state, or place in charge of any express company or other common carrier or person for transportation, any of the articles or things specified in section 617.201 or 617.241, or any circular, book, pamphlet, advertisement or notice relating thereto, with the intent of having the same conveyed by mail, express, or in any other manner; or who shall knowingly or willfully receive the same with intent to carry or convey it, or shall knowingly carry or convey the same by express, or in any other manner except by United States mail, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.  The provisions of this section and section 617.201 shall not be construed to apply to an article or instrument used by physicians lawfully practicing, or by their direction or prescription, for the cure or prevention of disease.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 22.  Minnesota Statutes 2022, section 628.26, is amended to read:

 

628.26 LIMITATIONS.

 

(a) Indictments or complaints for any crime resulting in the death of the victim may be found or made at any time after the death of the person killed.

 

(b) Indictments or complaints for a violation of section 609.25 may be found or made at any time after the commission of the offense.

 

(c) Indictments or complaints for violation of section 609.282 may be found or made at any time after the commission of the offense if the victim was under the age of 18 at the time of the offense.

 

(d) Indictments or complaints for violation of section 609.282 where the victim was 18 years of age or older at the time of the offense, or 609.42, subdivision 1, clause (1) or (2), shall be found or made and filed in the proper court within six years after the commission of the offense.

 

(e) Indictments or complaints for violation of sections 609.322, 609.342 to 609.345, and 609.3458 may be found or made at any time after the commission of the offense.

 

(f) Indictments or complaints for violation of sections 609.466 and 609.52, subdivision 2, paragraph (a), clause (3), item (iii), shall be found or made and filed in the proper court within six years after the commission of the offense.

 

(g) Indictments or complaints for violation of section 609.2335, 609.52, subdivision 2, paragraph (a), clause (3), items (i) and (ii), (4), (15), or (16), 609.631, or 609.821, where the value of the property or services stolen is more than $35,000, or for violation of section 609.527 where the offense involves eight or more direct victims or the total combined loss to the direct and indirect victims is more than $35,000, shall be found or made and filed in the proper court within five years after the commission of the offense.


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(h) Except for violations relating to false material statements, representations or omissions, indictments or complaints for violations of section 609.671 shall be found or made and filed in the proper court within five years after the commission of the offense.

 

(i) Indictments or complaints for violation of sections 609.561 to 609.563, shall be found or made and filed in the proper court within five years after the commission of the offense.

 

(j) Indictments or complaints for violation of section 609.746 shall be found or made and filed in the proper court within the later of three years after the commission of the offense or three years after the offense was reported to law enforcement authorities.

 

(j) (k) In all other cases, indictments or complaints shall be found or made and filed in the proper court within three years after the commission of the offense.